Vehicle recovery

Submitted: Saturday, May 16, 2009 at 21:03
ThreadID: 68906 Views:3254 Replies:8 FollowUps:11
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A group of us are planning a trip from Wyndham to Cocklebiddy via CSR, Eagle H'way etc and are lookong to cover all contingencies. Does anyone know of any vehicle recovery services operating from Pt Hedland, Newman, Wiluna, Laverton or Kalgoorlie? Any contacts would be most welcome.
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Reply By: Motherhen - Saturday, May 16, 2009 at 22:14

Saturday, May 16, 2009 at 22:14
Being a member of an Automobile Club, such as RAC would be a start. A fat wallet would be another need. Yellow pages for each of those towns may help you.

Motherhen
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Reply By: Member - Fred B (NT) - Sunday, May 17, 2009 at 00:22

Sunday, May 17, 2009 at 00:22
HF radio and membership in VKS-737 or similar would be a great advantage.... if you got into strife a call to a VKS base would probably see another VKS member in your area come to your assist if they were able to do so.

Vehicle recovery by a business would see you parting with a very thick wad of cash....!
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Reply By: Willem - Sunday, May 17, 2009 at 02:30

Sunday, May 17, 2009 at 02:30
FJB

My take on your question is that if you have to plan for contingencies such as you suggest then you are not prepared well enough and need to go back to the drawing board and rethink your strategy.

Any outback recovery will cost mega-bucks so the only option is to be very well prepared and make sure that you have necessary tools and expertise to handle most events. Driving to conditions and correct tyre pressures shouldl see you through without dramas. Always carry a spare set of shockabsorbers for your vehicle when out in that country.


Cheers
AnswerID: 365330

Follow Up By: Shaker - Sunday, May 17, 2009 at 19:09

Sunday, May 17, 2009 at 19:09
How do you prepare for a blown engine or transmission? Which can happen at any time for a myriad of reasons, no matter how well you may prepare.
Surely by asking the question he is planning for the final contingency, which is, what to do if all else fails!
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Follow Up By: Willem - Sunday, May 17, 2009 at 19:28

Sunday, May 17, 2009 at 19:28
Yeah or you can get out of your vehicle and break an ankle and then not be able to drive!!!

Blown engines or alike normally give some indication that they are on their way out beforehand. If you are well prepared then an engine shouldn't blow out bush. But that is not to say it couldn't.

If you are going to worry about "What if' then you may as well stay at home.


There was a bloke a few years back who had a heart attack and passed away in the middle of the Hay River run. Nothing else to do but to wrap him up in a tarp and transport him for the next number of days to Birdsville. Things happen. You deal with it as it comes along. Could the travellers have thought and prepared of a
contingency plan for that event?

If all else fails (which would have to be catastrophic) I have at least 10 people I can contact to organise and mount a rescue.


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Reply By: vk1dx - Sunday, May 17, 2009 at 08:15

Sunday, May 17, 2009 at 08:15
How many vehicles and have you done any training?
AnswerID: 365339

Reply By: Patrol22 - Sunday, May 17, 2009 at 09:21

Sunday, May 17, 2009 at 09:21
For what it's worth FJB I fully agree with your approach. I doesn't matter how much planning you do Murphy can always rain on your parade. I can't help with telephone numbers in the area but suggest you give the local coppers in those towns a quick call and my guess is that they will not only put you in the right direction but also give you a 'pat on the back' for thinking ahead and beyond the normal we'll help each other out approach.
Enjoy the trip and may see you out there sometime...we leave Canberra 27 Jun and will be visiting some of those places.
Cheers
Pete
AnswerID: 365349

Follow Up By: Willem - Sunday, May 17, 2009 at 09:50

Sunday, May 17, 2009 at 09:50
So what have you organised for your trip, Pete ? As a contingency plan. Are you travelling solo?


Cheers
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Follow Up By: pt_nomad - Sunday, May 17, 2009 at 10:26

Sunday, May 17, 2009 at 10:26
Willem,
We have three vehicles for the entire trip, more in other parts e.g. 5 for the Simpson.
All vehicles have recovery points front and rear. We have had experience with moving dead vehicles in rough terrain - but not sand dunes.
Apart from tooling, common spares, a couple of winches and full recovery sets, we will also have a sat phone. All vehicles will have 2 spares , tyre repair gear and adequate food and water to stay on station for at least 5 days should the need arise.
Whilst we have a deal of experience, we can always learn from others. The forum has been great for that esp. your input of recent times Willem. Thanx.
Paul.
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Follow Up By: Willem - Sunday, May 17, 2009 at 11:12

Sunday, May 17, 2009 at 11:12
G'day Paul

Yep, its a never-ending learning curve as each participant in a journey brings somethiog along which you hadn't thought of. I have been at this for over 40 years now and am still learning. A useful site to have a look at as far as vehicle preparation goes can be readHERE



Cheers
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Follow Up By: Patrol22 - Sunday, May 17, 2009 at 13:14

Sunday, May 17, 2009 at 13:14
Paul has said it all Willem..we've done a lot of kilometres together over the years and each time out we learn something new and while I hope that we never ever have to use a commercial recovery operator it is always hand to know where the nearest one is....the investment in these vehicles is almost half the cost of a new house :-)
Cheers
Pete
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Follow Up By: FJB - Sunday, May 17, 2009 at 19:00

Sunday, May 17, 2009 at 19:00
Thanks for the responses. All of our group (4) have travelled in parts of the area several times before and I think we are about as prepared as we can be. However as Pete suggests, Mr Murphy is the one to look out for. If we expected to have to use a recovery service we probably would not go in the first place but if the worst should occur it is handy to know what is around the place.


We are leaving Kununurra in the last week of July soe we may well se you along the track, Pete.
Cheers
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Reply By: Bruce M - Sunday, May 17, 2009 at 12:18

Sunday, May 17, 2009 at 12:18
Halls Creek, while not on your list, has a recovery business covering the northern section of the CSR. It is the garage that has the RACWA contract, and also happens to be the Toyota dealer in Halls Creek.Halls Creek Toyota is at 137 Duncan Road, phone 08 9168 6150, fax 08 9168 6202 and email hallscreektoyota@yahoo.com.au.

When I spoke with the mechanic there in 2005 he mentioned having recovered a vehicle from the CSR at a cost of around $20k.

Hope that helps.

Bruce M
AnswerID: 365366

Follow Up By: SteveL (WA) - Sunday, May 17, 2009 at 12:55

Sunday, May 17, 2009 at 12:55
These guys recovered a Land Rover from between Well 40 and 41 on the CSR in 2007 at a cost of $15,000.
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FollowupID: 633066

Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Sunday, May 17, 2009 at 19:04

Sunday, May 17, 2009 at 19:04
Steve,
My recollection is that that recovery took a couple of weeks - they had problems with the recovery truck etc etc and people were dropping them supplies as they went by. It was a big cost for an electrical problem.
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FollowupID: 633120

Follow Up By: SteveL (WA) - Sunday, May 17, 2009 at 19:12

Sunday, May 17, 2009 at 19:12
Yeah,the first rescue attempt got to within a few k's but they had a few problems with dunes and returned to Hall's Creek.
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FollowupID: 633122

Reply By: Member - Black Mac - Monday, May 18, 2009 at 13:02

Monday, May 18, 2009 at 13:02
FBJ
Capricorn Roadhouse just south of Mt Newman recovery cost is $100.00 per hour

regards Jock

AnswerID: 365496

Reply By: Member - SR509 (WA) - Monday, May 18, 2009 at 13:45

Monday, May 18, 2009 at 13:45
My 2 cents worth.

I forget the proper name of the hill but I think it was out past well 29, it is like a pimple in a flat land, very steep and high. We drove up to take photos in a Jeep Wrangler 2008 model 4 door turbo diesel manual with diff lockers. A 4.2 TD Patrol GU did as well and did his clutch. Dead in the water so to speak.

The only way out was to tow out back to Newman for repairs. Now, he should have done his clutch before he left as he had 130,000km on the clock and never changed it which we didn't know about. So, believe it or not, the Jeep towed out a fully laden Patrol wagon and the Jeep was loaded too.

All I can say is take your time, make sure there is no one on the other side of the dunes before you hit it flat out. We were thinking we would be winching the patrol over each dune but we didn't get to that. Used a HELL of a lot of fuel, I think it was about 75.0L/100km out to Georgia Bore then onto Newman. We ended up blowing the front diff in the Jeep (not built tough enough) right at the end.

If you have three vehicles, you will be fine. Make sure all your recovery gear is up to scratch and if you have to tow over dunes, do it first thing in the morning when the sand is cold. You will be surprised what a difference it makes.


AnswerID: 365502

Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Monday, May 18, 2009 at 19:19

Monday, May 18, 2009 at 19:19
Ouch SR509 !

You remind me I have 200k up on Patrols clutch , but then it is a petrol engine - fingers crossed
Robin Miller

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