Major Mitchells or Pink Cockatoos in your travels?

Submitted: Tuesday, May 19, 2009 at 18:50
ThreadID: 68985 Views:3648 Replies:16 FollowUps:7
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I was wondering if other folks like me have seen Major Mitchells or Pink Cockatoos. Because of these great cockies being a bit on the scarce side I would appreciate hearing only general areas..(nothing that someone reading here can pinpoint accurately) as less than ethical types can be hard on nests and young of this species.

This species was on my top 1-5 birds that were a must see when I was in OZ.

If you would like to know more about my great parrot filming adventure you can come by and look here:

http://polytelismedia.wordpress.com/


Cheers!

Don


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Reply By: Motherhen - Tuesday, May 19, 2009 at 19:00

Tuesday, May 19, 2009 at 19:00
Hi Don

We have seen Major Mitchells several times. I can't recall where though. If i find i have noted it in my diaries i will let you know. They are usually in breeding pairs rather than larger groups like corellas and galahs. They will not nest within so many kilometres of another breeding pair. They are found in the inland areas all states except Tasmania, as they inhabit arid and semi arid regions. There are with very slight differences to the sub species in the states.

Motherhen
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Follow Up By: Member - extfilm (NSW) - Tuesday, May 19, 2009 at 19:45

Tuesday, May 19, 2009 at 19:45
You can call the bird what you wish but spare a thought to our indigeneous population whom the person "Major Mitchell" Slautered many of our native population without sparing a thought. The mob in western NSW only know the parrot as the Pink Cockatoo.
That is where I have seen thousands of them and are not rare at all there. Seen them in flocks.
Peter
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Follow Up By: Honky - Wednesday, May 20, 2009 at 09:30

Wednesday, May 20, 2009 at 09:30
Didn't see where he asked ofr a history lesson but get the facts here.

http://www.davidreilly.com/australian_explorers/mitchell/mitchell.htm

Honky
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Reply By: Member - Dennis P (Scotland) - Tuesday, May 19, 2009 at 19:06

Tuesday, May 19, 2009 at 19:06
Hi Don,

Have a look here,

All you need to know

CHeers,
Dennis

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Reply By: Sir Kev & Darkie - Tuesday, May 19, 2009 at 19:14

Tuesday, May 19, 2009 at 19:14
Don,

They are regularly sited around the St George Region in SW Queensland.

For some very good info on them and other Australian Natives Contact Rosehill Aviaries.

Cheers Kev
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Reply By: The Explorer - Tuesday, May 19, 2009 at 19:21

Tuesday, May 19, 2009 at 19:21
Hello
Spotted one down here in the south west the other day - couldnt believe my eyes - must have been an avairy escapee.

Not sure about other states but people report unusual bird sightings within WA here if thats any help. You can go back through the archives to find older sightings.

Western Australian Bird Sightings

If you join Birds Australia and sign up for the Atlas you can access birdata and get distribution maps like this which may be helpful. (Yes you can zoom in)

Image Could Not Be Found

Cheers
Greg
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Reply By: WayneD - Tuesday, May 19, 2009 at 19:49

Tuesday, May 19, 2009 at 19:49
Saw a couple nesting at Mutawintji NP a couple of years ago and thousands of Correllas at Menindee Lakes
AnswerID: 365720

Reply By: The Rambler( W.A.) - Tuesday, May 19, 2009 at 20:04

Tuesday, May 19, 2009 at 20:04
Seen them around Wilcannia NSW
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Reply By: Rod, Sydney - Tuesday, May 19, 2009 at 21:01

Tuesday, May 19, 2009 at 21:01
The Eyre Bird Observatory in WA on the Nullarbor has a *lot* of them.

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Follow Up By: Horacehighroller - Tuesday, May 19, 2009 at 21:08

Tuesday, May 19, 2009 at 21:08
I'm confused!

The birds in the picture above appear to be what I have always thought were "Galahs"

Are they also "Major Mitchells"

If not - What are they?

Peter
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Follow Up By: joker.com - Tuesday, May 19, 2009 at 22:07

Tuesday, May 19, 2009 at 22:07
Peter, the birds in this pic are Major Mitchell's. Galahs have grey wingsand have no "comb". Major Mitchell's have white wings and a large "comb".
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Follow Up By: Horacehighroller - Tuesday, May 19, 2009 at 22:42

Tuesday, May 19, 2009 at 22:42
Thanks Joker.

Peter
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Follow Up By: Rod, Sydney - Wednesday, May 20, 2009 at 06:21

Wednesday, May 20, 2009 at 06:21
Another photo with comb raised

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Reply By: Member - Richard H (NSW) - Tuesday, May 19, 2009 at 21:01

Tuesday, May 19, 2009 at 21:01
The 'Scotia Country' between Broken Hill & The Murray River.
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Reply By: Mandrake - Tuesday, May 19, 2009 at 21:54

Tuesday, May 19, 2009 at 21:54
I seem to recall the rangers at Lake Mungo saying they had a small population of Pinkl Cockatoos in their area .

Rgds

Mandrake
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Reply By: Member - John and Val W (ACT) - Tuesday, May 19, 2009 at 21:58

Tuesday, May 19, 2009 at 21:58
Saw a couple of small flocks last year between Menindee and Broken Hill. Beautiful birds

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Reply By: Geoff (Newcastle, NSW) - Tuesday, May 19, 2009 at 22:16

Tuesday, May 19, 2009 at 22:16
Hi Don,

I've seen very small concentrations of major Mitchells in the Wee Waa, Narrabri, Moree district of NSW.

Geoff

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Reply By: Blaze (Berri) - Wednesday, May 20, 2009 at 02:02

Wednesday, May 20, 2009 at 02:02
Just drove down from Menindee Lakes via Ivanhoe Road then across to Pooncarie and we seen quite a few, they are also usually up around Lake Mungo.

Hope you get to see some.


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Reply By:- Wednesday, May 20, 2009 at 06:53

Wednesday, May 20, 2009 at 06:53
Hi Don, Major Mitchell cockatoos are easily found in SW Qld. One good spot for them is Kilcowera Station , it's on the Dowling Track which goes from Bourke in NSW to Quilpie in Qld.

They are beautiful birds and remarkably quiet while they are foraging. Cheers Gecko

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Reply By: jdphoto - Wednesday, May 20, 2009 at 08:18

Wednesday, May 20, 2009 at 08:18
We saw a pair of Pink Cockatoos week before last (9 May) at the main camp at Mungo NP.

And last week(12-13 May) we saw 4 along Homestead Creek at Mutawintji NP northeast of Broken Hill.
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Reply By: Rod W - Wednesday, May 20, 2009 at 09:33

Wednesday, May 20, 2009 at 09:33
Don,

Here's another feathered friend that may tempt you back to Aus, its the Night Parrot Pezoporus occidentalis
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Reply By: Honky - Wednesday, May 20, 2009 at 11:15

Wednesday, May 20, 2009 at 11:15
I find the black cockatoo to be a more striking bird.
If you wanted a sulphur crested cockatoo and I had a gun I could send you some in the post ( Joke everybody)
They are a pest in my area

Honky
AnswerID: 365805

Follow Up By: Louie the fly (SA) - Wednesday, May 20, 2009 at 14:37

Wednesday, May 20, 2009 at 14:37
We have quite a few Black Cockatoos (both yellow and red ones) here at home in the Adelaide Hills. They are a fabulous looking bird and their screech is something else (until they drop a pine cone on your car). And we get 1000's of Sulphur Crested's in the trees up the river - noisy b's. every morning and evening just after nesting season and the young take to the wing.

My grandpa had a Major Mitchell as a pet. He got it at least 5 years before my mum was born, mum died at age 56, 14 years ago. Dancy Cocky (what we kids called him) died 5 years ago. That made him around 70 years old.

Louie
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