Toyota diesel specs

Submitted: Sunday, Sep 21, 2003 at 22:46
ThreadID: 7340 Views:2757 Replies:11 FollowUps:13
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G'day All,

Well, the decision has been made to upgrade to a diesel.

For my application, i.e. long distance and some serious offroad travel, I will require a Troopcarrier with LR tanks. It has been mentioned in a previous thread that a diesel engine with a mechanical pump may be better than the later common rail fuel system. Up to which year of manufacture was the mechanical pump a feature with Toyota? I am writing a spec list so that when I am ready I can go to my industry contact and put the order in.

All answers appreciated.

Cheers

Willie
Never a dull moment
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Reply By: Member- Rox - Sunday, Sep 21, 2003 at 23:48

Sunday, Sep 21, 2003 at 23:48
Rest in one piece Rosey!!!!
Youv'e done a great job

Turbo diesel wuold be good not sure the come in the troopie.Have 4WD will Explore
AnswerID: 31639

Follow Up By: Willie - Monday, Sep 22, 2003 at 11:15

Monday, Sep 22, 2003 at 11:15
Rosie will not be pensioned off just yet. We still have a few trips to do between now and summer. Might even put her on seasonal registration and keep her as a project car and she will be of vintage value in 2008. She is in pretty much original condition and just needs a decent spray job and not the Williepaintjob she now has :-))
Cheers,
WillieNever a dull moment
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FollowupID: 22583

Reply By: chopper - Monday, Sep 22, 2003 at 06:15

Monday, Sep 22, 2003 at 06:15
the turbo diesel 78 series is sensational!!
AnswerID: 31641

Reply By: haze - Monday, Sep 22, 2003 at 06:34

Monday, Sep 22, 2003 at 06:34
Don think tojo has gone common rail, fly by wire yet (ie2003) in any 6cyl.
cheers haze
AnswerID: 31642

Reply By: John - Monday, Sep 22, 2003 at 12:35

Monday, Sep 22, 2003 at 12:35
I agree with chopper the turbo 78 series is bloody fantastic.
I cannot wait to get my new RV out in the red stuff.
Having had two petrol troopys prior to this one I was expecting it to be some what slow and lacking.
How wrong was I, I would say it stands it ground with the petrol in terms of pick and general acceleration. No decernable turbo lag.
I have towed my work trailer (Weight about 1.8 tonnes) and it does it better than the petrol.
As you can gather I am very impressed to date.
Also remember that the later year 75 and the new 78 series comes with duel 90 litre tanks as standard.

Regards
John
AnswerID: 31664

Follow Up By: Willie - Monday, Sep 22, 2003 at 14:01

Monday, Sep 22, 2003 at 14:01
Hi John,
Unfortunately I am not in the same league as far as buying a new Troopy goes and that is why I have asked the question on which manufacturers date did Toyota change their diesel fuel systems. My budget runs to an earlier model Troopy say mid 90's. My other question is when did Troopcarriers star coming out with dual 90lt tanks? When I get the answers I will be able to assess what I can aim for.
Cheers,
WillieNever a dull moment
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FollowupID: 22594

Reply By: haze - Monday, Sep 22, 2003 at 16:38

Monday, Sep 22, 2003 at 16:38
Dual tanks (2x90l.) from 1985 -- start of 75 series. Larger gearbox bearings 1990, also intro of 1hz ohc diesel.
AnswerID: 31682

Follow Up By: Willie - Monday, Sep 22, 2003 at 17:18

Monday, Sep 22, 2003 at 17:18
Thanks haze that helps heaps. I was under the impression that the Troopy's had gearbox problems after 1990 as I met a very unhappy bloke with a 1992 model up in the Alice who had a stuffed box and it was going to cost him 4 grand(1995...what would it be now!) to repair. Any knowledge?
Cheers,
WillieNever a dull moment
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FollowupID: 22605

Follow Up By: John - Monday, Sep 22, 2003 at 19:57

Monday, Sep 22, 2003 at 19:57
Hi Willie
The current gearbox is the same as that fitted to the 100 series.
I have had a Troopy since 1997 and it had twin 90 L tanks and I am sure that they where avaliable long before that.
Regards
John
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FollowupID: 22613

Reply By: greg - Monday, Sep 22, 2003 at 17:19

Monday, Sep 22, 2003 at 17:19
You do not have to bleed the hz fuel system
AnswerID: 31687

Reply By: ToyMotor - Monday, Sep 22, 2003 at 20:18

Monday, Sep 22, 2003 at 20:18
I have an RV Troopy manufactured in April 2001, as far as I know it was one of the last 1HZ engined 78 series sold in Aust. I'm in Adelaide, and got it trucked down from Queensland, the local dealer reckoned it was the only one he could find anywhere! I took delivery in August 2001, having placed the order in June.

So to answer your question, anything manufactured before April 2001 will have a mechanical pump.

Cheers
AnswerID: 31702

Follow Up By: Willie - Monday, Sep 22, 2003 at 20:32

Monday, Sep 22, 2003 at 20:32
Thanks mate, all data going into my info page so that I know what I am looking at.
Cheers
WillieNever a dull moment
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FollowupID: 22616

Reply By: Bille - Monday, Sep 22, 2003 at 22:37

Monday, Sep 22, 2003 at 22:37
Hi Willie
This is Billy
Don't be Silly
You can't fix a Turbo with 12 gauge fencing wire
Stick to the basic systems
75 Series 1998 rv troopcarrier hipop
Exrental britz/moui now with 240K on the clock

ps what does this mean "with a mechanical pump may be better than the later common rail fuel system. "

Fay-d-Away at home
AnswerID: 31719

Follow Up By: Willie - Tuesday, Sep 23, 2003 at 09:06

Tuesday, Sep 23, 2003 at 09:06
Hi Billy,
I am not so silly,
As to think that I can aspire,
To fix most things, with fencing wire
But I will.... buy a truck to thrill
Even a bushie by the name of Will

Might even enter a poetry competition :-)))

ps what does this mean....???? Don't know, I took it from another thread on the forum a while back. Probably means that for a bushie like me the mechanical pump version is less complicated.
Cheers,
WillieNever a dull moment
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FollowupID: 22643

Reply By: haze - Tuesday, Sep 23, 2003 at 08:00

Tuesday, Sep 23, 2003 at 08:00
Willie. The gear box problem was a built in tojo "feature" the seal between the box and the t/case leaked, all the box oil ending up in the t/case - result seized box, lots $$'s. Adouble lip seal fixed the prob., another remedy a pipe connecting both filler plugs, as the oil leaked into the t/case the pipe conveyed it back again! However it was always a "random" sort of thing, I had an 85 mod. which did 340k. (when sold) no problem and present 97 mod. no prob. If you can locate 4x4 2002 yearbook it features the latest 78 with 1HD-FTE donk. 122kw and 380nm. torque- some grunt. But it is still a mechanical injector pump. The n/a version is still the 1HZ, 96kw, 285nm. The new (for it) gearbox is the H150F, critisised for its shorter 5th, 2800rpm @ 100kph against mine 2450 @100. Also the new 5 stud wheels mean that the shed full of 6 stud ones are rs. Looking under the newer ones sees less mechanicals protection. I installed polyair bags on the rear and monroe pump up shocks on the front to balance. My 75 tray is 2850kg. net which includes all the gear bolted in (60l trailblazer, welder/generator, 5hp honda battery charger, 2x100ah batts, 2 spair wheels, 10000lb. winch etc.) The 78 is no better in the spring department.Will cruise at 100 for 11.5l/100, head wind add another 1.5l.
Balancing plastic content to steel, (ie later=more plastic!) I reckon 97/98 about the ideal if going s/h
cheers haze
AnswerID: 31728

Follow Up By: Willie - Tuesday, Sep 23, 2003 at 08:58

Tuesday, Sep 23, 2003 at 08:58
Thanks once again Haze, this is the info that I needed. Yes, I had a FJ55 and had fitted a bypass hose which got snagged from time to time as I had removed the bash plates. Carried some spare hoses. The gearbox outlasted the body which rusted away on me. The old truck did 550K before it passed away.
I just happen to have the 2002 Yearbook with me mate Ron Moon feratured on the front page. I have actually considered a ute but I am a bit worried about cabin space as I am 6'3". A Troopy should do me fine and I will be looking for the latest uncomplicated model I can afford.
Cheers,
WillieNever a dull moment
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FollowupID: 22642

Follow Up By: Old Jack - Tuesday, Sep 23, 2003 at 17:07

Tuesday, Sep 23, 2003 at 17:07
Wille,
at 6'3" even the new 78 series ute is pushed for space, I'm just on 6 foot tall, and find the older utes terrible to sit in, the 78 series is better but probably out of your budget. for a ute the nissan patrol with coil springs rides better and has a more comfortable cab & dosn.t have the gear box problems . As the LC ute has to short a wheel base for it's size it seem to still have the noddy ride like the old fj shorties just not quiet so pronounced.

And yes keep the old girl & get historical plates for it!

Happy vehical hunting
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FollowupID: 22672

Follow Up By: Willie - Tuesday, Sep 23, 2003 at 18:27

Tuesday, Sep 23, 2003 at 18:27
G'day Old Jack,

Wouldn't the Troopy have better seating space than a ute? That type of vehicle would suit me better.
Cheers
Willie
Never a dull moment
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FollowupID: 22678

Follow Up By: Old Jack - Saturday, Sep 27, 2003 at 13:17

Saturday, Sep 27, 2003 at 13:17
Hi Wille, if you probably have had a chance to take a troopy for a spin by now, seating & seating space is a little beter in that you have somewhere to move things too in the troopy, a set of after market bucket seats are well worth the money if spending s long time in the saddle so to speak as the originals where a bit sad. I like the space in the back of the troopy for fitting out with gear as with a little planing fuel, food & gear can be packed with a false floor & have room to sleep two inside. In the rought stuff the troopy has a lot of rear overhang, but if like most people your are travelling off road rather than out rock hopping they are a reasonadle compromise.

regard's
Jack

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FollowupID: 22962

Follow Up By: Willie - Saturday, Sep 27, 2003 at 18:11

Saturday, Sep 27, 2003 at 18:11
Thanks for the feedback, Jack.
No haven't had a chance to take Troopy out yet but a mate is coming through in a couple of weeks with one. He has one with an extra side door. Will have a look at the seating arrangement then. I have actually built the back of my G60 like you suggest and a Troopy will give just that extra space. I will not be ready to buy one till around April next year so there is plenty of time to evaluate the vehicles. And yes, offroad driving not rock hopping is the theme. Getting too old for the latter kind of caper:-))
Cheers,
Willie

Never a dull moment
0
FollowupID: 22976

Reply By: haze - Wednesday, Sep 24, 2003 at 20:56

Wednesday, Sep 24, 2003 at 20:56
Willie, Perhaps "old jack" missed your question, but my thought is that the troopy will allow more seat travel than the t/back. But of course, soon as you get aboard you are going to work that one out! I also think the troopy has more head room. I'me a bit of a shortarse, the seating suits me fine (ever see a 6'4 jap?!!) When it comes down to it the japs were always great copiers, but then they usually managed to include the worst as well as the best! (perhaps excluding oil leaks)
cheers haze
AnswerID: 31913

Follow Up By: Willie - Wednesday, Sep 24, 2003 at 21:20

Wednesday, Sep 24, 2003 at 21:20
Thanks Haze......Yeah my old G60 does not have too much space up front and I have to stop quite often to stretch my legs. I butchered the seat a bit to get the backrest at an easier angle.

Oil leaks? They were perfected by the Poms. I once bought a brand new Austin Mini and it had dripped a puddle of oil on the showroom floor!!

Cheers,
WillieNever a dull moment
0
FollowupID: 22778

Reply By: Warpig - Thursday, Oct 16, 2003 at 18:41

Thursday, Oct 16, 2003 at 18:41
Regarding HZJ75 gearbox problems: a couple of years ago the spline to the transfer case input gear on the gearbox output shaft on my 1992 troopcarrier wore out. This is apparently quite usual for gearboxes of that vintage, at 170-200,000 km, according to the place where I bought the new gear and shaft, and the occasional message on-line. Replacing this stuff, and the bearings and seals in the transfer and gearbox (with a new clutch for good measure) was far from an impossible job to perform at home, although getting the bellhousing/gearbox/transfer case unit out from underneath the vehicle was a bit of a nuisance.

I have heard people suggesting that this problem may be related to the transfer / gearbox oil transfer problem, however that makes no sense whatsoever, as the gear is a press fit on the splines and thus logically will not be lubricated by the gearbox oil. It appears to be a factor of inadequate spline design: a finer spline would have alleviated or at least delayed the problem.

If you are buying a vehicle of this vintage, make sure the shaft has at least been examined properly! You can have a look by removing the PTO cover, and should be able to check play in the gear with a big screwdriver or wrecking bar (never tried it: we found the problem when we stripped the gearbox). As other have said, while you're at it, make sure the oil transfer problem has been dealt with. I fixed it with a breather on the transfer case rather than the usual pipe between the oil filler plugs, and this works well for those interested, in combination with new intermediate shaft 'o' rings.

Of course, you could buy my 75 series, if I haven't sold it by the time you're in the market!

AnswerID: 34070

Follow Up By: Willie - Thursday, Oct 16, 2003 at 20:14

Thursday, Oct 16, 2003 at 20:14
A bloke I know who works on 4x4's quite a bit reckons that there is a nut at the rear of the gearbox which has not been tightened enough at the factory. According to him the nut is only tightened to 120 whatever when it should be tightened to 200 whatever. This should be done every 200,000 to 250,00km and then you should have no troubles with the gearbox. I have no idea if this is true.
Cheers
Willie
Never a dull moment
0
FollowupID: 24528

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