WAECO Fridge Modifications

Hi all

I use 2 Waeco CF50, one as a fridge and one a freezer.

Has any one got any mods that you have done to your CF fridge to get it running a bit better. I have seen a mod where someone has simply siliconed a peice of conduit to a 30 or 40mm CPU type fan and cable tied it to the side of the basket. Cold air is simply drawn up the conduit to the top of fridge. I am thinking of doing this but putting a bend at the top and directing the cold air over into the dairy compartment and maybe powering the fan from the interior light so it turns off when you open the lid. Its all about a 50lt really being a 41lt + 9lt dairy. It would be perfect for coldies instead of rumaging around for half an hour.

Has anyone done this ?

Also removing and replacing the mounted 80mm condensor fan with a 120mm unit , connecting it to the fan circuit, keeping in mind the fan over current function. Reason being that recently up Cape York, ambient was 37 deg, with fridge on -10 setting, fridge would not go below -4deg. It started at -10 but further north we went up she came. Contents below were still frozen but up top it was a bit watery. It was like this for 2 weeks, in the ute, under a tree, wet towels etc. Bought a couple of ice creams at the ferry only to pull up later ..... sorry, I still have trouble talking about it.

Has anyone done this ?

Has anybody got any more mods for their Waeco fridge that you're willing to share ?

Look forward to your replies, Dave



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Reply By: Member - Graham H (QLD) - Saturday, Jan 02, 2010 at 16:44

Saturday, Jan 02, 2010 at 16:44
We have our 60lt on -10 and apart from a couple of weeks ago when it was 51deg and it went up to -2 and a few days ago it was over 42 it went up to -4 we havent had any probs either in the car or outside.

The 42 deg day it was back to -8 overnight and the weather changed the 51 deg day and it was only 17 the next morning so it pulled down ok.

We only open it about once a day, so may make a difference if you pull a can out every half hour

Cheers
AnswerID: 397318

Follow Up By: trackker - Saturday, Jan 02, 2010 at 17:03

Saturday, Jan 02, 2010 at 17:03
Hi Graham, I reckon I could of kept my cans in there. When your fridge was fluctuating were you on battery supply ? Did you have everything up top slightly thawing at -2 ? Have you done any mods or are you happy with the way that works Cheers , Dave
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Follow Up By: Member - Graham H (QLD) - Saturday, Jan 02, 2010 at 17:30

Saturday, Jan 02, 2010 at 17:30
Was on 240 till I put it in car on hottest day.

The 51 day it was outside originally and we put it in the car and went sightseeing as it was cooler in the car for all of us and there was a hot dry wind blowing and had no where else to put it out of the heat.

This week it has been kept in the ensuite we have at the van park as it has been slightly cooler in there so has been on 240v.

Even van fridge turned onto high didnt keep things as cold as usual on the 51 day. Dont think anything would.
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Follow Up By: Member - Morry H (WA) - Saturday, Jan 02, 2010 at 22:58

Saturday, Jan 02, 2010 at 22:58
If you are using a portable fridge as a freezer all you need to do is place a damp towel on top of your frozen articles.
Now put cool drinks etc on top of that.
You will never have any more problems as long as you have power to the fridge.
We went around australia and that worked for us over a 13 month trip.
Terrific idea that someone passed on to me.
Titan our wonderful traveling companion

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Reply By: Member - Allan B (QLD) - Saturday, Jan 02, 2010 at 17:17

Saturday, Jan 02, 2010 at 17:17
Hi Dave,

I installed an 80mm PC fan inside the compressor/condenser compartment of my Waeco to supplement the existing fan. Can't tell if it's doing a lot of good but figured that it must help.

Interesting idea putting a CPU fan in the fridge. Turns it into a fan-forced model.
I'm not unhappy at having a "dairy section" in my fridge.

Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: trackker - Saturday, Jan 02, 2010 at 17:24

Saturday, Jan 02, 2010 at 17:24
Thanks Allan, the dairy section is almost useless to me and to most people I ask. Thought it was a fantastic idea when I bought it though. What size waeco and did you double stack or mount the fan elsewhere. Cheers , Dave
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Follow Up By: trackker - Saturday, Jan 02, 2010 at 17:39

Saturday, Jan 02, 2010 at 17:39
Allan, how did you power it. Was it in the fan circuit or powered from the batt direct. Thanks
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Follow Up By: Member - Allan B (QLD) - Saturday, Jan 02, 2010 at 18:09

Saturday, Jan 02, 2010 at 18:09
Dave, Mine is a Waeco CF35 and I mounted the second fan on the opposite side to the original fan. It's powered in parallel with the existing fan feed.

I find that my Waeco CF35 has quite a temperature gradient fro top to bottom.
We run it at about -5C at he bottom and that keeps the bottom layer of meat frozen. It's also cryovaced. The upper layer and the dairy section then run at about +7 which is fine by me as I don't want the cheese or tomatoes frozen.

Certainly, running one fridge as a freezer and another as a fridge seems ideal to me but we have neither the space nor the battery capacity to do this.

Cheers
Allan

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Reply By: Wherehegon - Saturday, Jan 02, 2010 at 21:46

Saturday, Jan 02, 2010 at 21:46
Hi Dave we have the CF50, when we did the high country a few years back we had high 30's and we used ours as a feezer, I had it set for -12 and it held it there the hole time running from the hilux battery. We were opening it heaps also adding warm cans to it for a few hours before putting them into the 90L evacool that contained block ice which lasted just on 7 days. Maybe get it checked out to make sure its operating properly. I know the thermisters go in them as mine did. We also use it at the farm which can get easily above 40 and it still holds the temp, we are also getting another one and then have the same set up as your self, with a little one now we dont have the room for the big esky any more......Regards Steve
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Follow Up By: trackker - Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 10:01

Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 10:01
Thanks Steve, I had it checked out as soon as we got back as the internal AC transformer smoked up while we were away. When I queried the repairer re freezer fluctuation, it was deemed normal as the very high humidity at this time of year makes it harder to cool the condenser. And they agreed a bigger fan would help. I have also had a thermistor go, along with 2 control boards over the last couple years, now the transformer. Waeco covered it even though 1 month out of warranty. I had complained about the quality of their parts so they back tracked the serial number to check previous repairs. Sounds like they are having a lot of warranty issues I believe. Cheers , Dave
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Follow Up By: Member - Allan B (QLD) - Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 10:19

Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 10:19
"the very high humidity at this time of year makes it harder to cool the condenser".

Not true I'm afraid Dave.

Higher humidity=higher air density which accommodates MORE heat transfer from the condenser to the air.

What does deteriorate with higher humidity is the evaporation rate of perspiration on our skin and evaporative air coolers.

But higher ambient TEMPERATURES reduce the energy transfer from the condenser and at the same time increases the fridge load due to heat gain through the cabinet insulation. Double whammy!

Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: trackker - Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 10:58

Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 10:58
Allan, what you say seems to make sense, going to look into that. The insulation does seem to be very poor as the fridge sometimes has condensed water just pouring off it. The bag seems to have water coming out everywhere and the sides of the fridge are very cold so I can see a lot of temp loss through this water. I have heard of people making up an extra thick bags or having an inner bag made out of wetsuit material that the std bag fits over. Has anybody heard of this ?
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Follow Up By: Member - Allan B (QLD) - Monday, Jan 04, 2010 at 15:20

Monday, Jan 04, 2010 at 15:20
Dave, there is no doubt that extra cabinet insulation in the form of proprietary or home-made transit bags or drop-over covers made of foam do improve the performance. The original fridge insulation is a compromise between effectiveness, overall size and cost and will suit some but not all. The proprietary transit bags are really for protection and their insulation is minimal.

In doing a home construction, the design is somewhat determined by available materials and tools. Some ways that come to mind are wet-suit material which can be quite good as it is easy to cut, can be glued with contact cement, is stretchy so can be a snug fit and flexible to open the top. Similar and thicker foam can be got from Clark Rubber and others. Another is a styrofoam-lined plywood box which is a drop-on fit over the whole cabinet (good in a ute tray).
Others may suggest other and better ideas.

The cover will be more effective if it is a snug fit to prevent air circulation between the cover and the cabinet and of course adequate openings must be provide for ventilation of the compressor/condenser compartment.

I have also noted some photos on this site of vehicle rear drawers/cabinets which have the fridge mounted on a slide in an enclosed section which appears to have ventilation only to one side where it slides out. Not good! Adequate ventilation is essential or the fan is only recirculating the hot air.

Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Member - Allan B (QLD) - Monday, Jan 04, 2010 at 15:32

Monday, Jan 04, 2010 at 15:32
Dave, I just notice that you said "The bag seems to have water coming out everywhere"

This is most unusual. I have not seen it or heard of it before. Sounds rather as though the original cabinet insulation has somehow failed. Maybe saturated with water? Has anyone else seen this? Can anyone comment on the Waeco insulation? I would suspect it to be of foam-in-place material and therefore difficult or impossible to open the cabinet to inspect. Perhaps it has all been consumed by termites! LOL



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Allan

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Follow Up By: trackker - Monday, Jan 04, 2010 at 16:18

Monday, Jan 04, 2010 at 16:18
Allan, the fridge had condensed water all over it and leaks out the zips and vent area for the condenser fan. (running at -4deg) It fills up the "cup holders thingys" on the lid. It pools around the base. Its basically a dehumidifier on steriods I reckon. Then the dust turns to mud and the bags have to be washed after the trip. I wish I would have taken photos. The humidity was rather extreme I must say but no different to anywhere else on Cape York at this time of year. The fridge sides are quite cold when you slide your hand down the side of the bag. The other fridge (+4) is doing the same but to a lesser extent, rightly so, so no, it is not coming from inside the insulation. I remember a while ago on waeco website the bags can make up a difference of 2 deg but is that in real terms. I would believe so. The ply box is a good Idea when in extreme temps. And I think the wetsuit material would get rid of the air gap a lot better. More insulation must equal less current draw. Thanks for your ideas, I appreciate them. My aim is to get my fridges running a bit better or else I may have to go to a fridge with better insulation and less electronics. Horses for courses. Cheers , Dave
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Reply By: Alloy c/t - Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 11:23

Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 11:23
One aspect that most people forget is that Waeco in the fine print state the cooling capabillity of their fridges , you cant expect better than the 50 degree maximum variation that the makers claim ,
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Reply By: Member - Mike DID - Monday, Jan 04, 2010 at 10:35

Monday, Jan 04, 2010 at 10:35
I've reduced the current consumption of my early-model CF35 by installing a baffle around the fan in the compressor compartment.

The original installation just blows air around inside the compartment, without strongly sucking in cold air through the small vents.

The baffle prevents air bypassing the fan, so now air gets sucked in on one side, flows over the coils, through the fan, over the coils and out the vents on the other side. I know it works because the vents on one side are cool and those on the other side are hot.
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Follow Up By: Member - Cantiva Clay (NSW) - Monday, Jan 04, 2010 at 14:16

Monday, Jan 04, 2010 at 14:16
Hi Tracker, do you have the zip up bag that goes around the fridge: http://www.waeco.com.au/products4.asp?id=119&catId=57&subCatId=60&subCatId2=71 I use this on my 40 and its cool inside the cover so must help, also used thin draft stop around the lid & that helped a bit to. Mike I think your comment is interesting as I have wondered if there is any airflow through the vents a number of times. What did you make the baffle out of?
If you don't have dairy, the dairy section is useful for throwing water in the cask style bag in it (discard the box) 2L bag fits right in.
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Follow Up By: Member - Mike DID - Monday, Jan 04, 2010 at 14:21

Monday, Jan 04, 2010 at 14:21
The baffle is made out of 4mm closed-cell foam.

I cut a hole in it the size of the fan and then slots in it where it needs to go past the condensor tubes. It has to be thin enough so it can fit between the wires that link the condensor tubes.
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Follow Up By: trackker - Monday, Jan 04, 2010 at 16:28

Monday, Jan 04, 2010 at 16:28
Cantiva, got the bag and yes it helps. Could you expand on the draft stop a bit. Would it go around the lid gap or under it.

Mike , I know its a big ask but would you have a pic at all. Thanks heaps for the ideas. Cheers, Dave
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Follow Up By: Member - Cantiva Clay (NSW) - Monday, Jan 04, 2010 at 22:32

Monday, Jan 04, 2010 at 22:32
Hi Mike Vote 2 for a photo. Trackker, after a bit of experimentation I found the B shape soft rubber draft stop works best - rip it in half - double is to strong as itwill tend to hold the lid open vs close the gap, thats the same reason it only runs down the sides and not around the ends where the gap is small anyway.Image Could Not Be FoundImage Could Not Be Found
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Follow Up By: Member - Mike DID - Wednesday, Jan 06, 2010 at 10:51

Wednesday, Jan 06, 2010 at 10:51
Have a look at Photo 1 in Reply 7 below.

The foam sheet fits over the fan, so the fan is roughly in the middle of the foam.

I had to remove the fan temporarily to cut and fit the foam over it. The inside edge of the foam has slots cut in it so you can push it right against the wall of the fridge. To mark where the cuts should be just push it against the coils.

The idea is to seal all around the fan to provide positive circulation. Air only gets in through the vents closest to the fan; and only exits at the vents furthest from the fan.
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Follow Up By: jdwynn (Adelaide) - Thursday, Feb 18, 2010 at 21:36

Thursday, Feb 18, 2010 at 21:36
Gee Mike, I didn't want to bother you about this, but I would just about kill for a photo - I think I understand what you're saying but then again.....?? Just need to reduce power consumption by our Waeco - in our case it's a 110 litre upright - never draws less than 3.6amps and hardly stops. Cheers.
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Reply By: Member - Trackker (QLD) - Tuesday, Jan 05, 2010 at 12:32

Tuesday, Jan 05, 2010 at 12:32
Hi all, have had a look at 3 models of CF50 re installing bigger fans and have come to the conclusion that because of the different arrangement of the condenser coil in each model that the following is possible.

CF50-DC 120mm can be fitted to replace 90 mm original fan
CF50-AC Ver A can also be fitted with a 120mm fan
CF50-AC Ver B 90mm fan can only be replaced by a higher volume 90mm fan

So I have replaced the fan in the CF50 DC which is the older style fridge with the dots that show the temp setting. Took about 30 mins and a soldering iron, screw driver and a pair of pliers. The original fan was full of dust and is not IP rated as you can see the internal coils of the motor.
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Original fan was .280 amp draw and about 40 CFM. The new 120mm fan (cat no YX2522) is .380 amps and is 80 CFM based on info from Jaycar, . New fan also has a an IP rating of 55 and has a ball bearing instead of a sleeve and works fantastic. Downside is that the noise is increased but for my needs it would not bother me. You can actually feel the heat coming out the other side of the vents.
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Stay tuned for more pics of the finished product, hoping to get them up later today.

Cheers, Dave
AnswerID: 397732

Follow Up By: Member - Vince B (NSW) - Tuesday, Feb 16, 2010 at 17:48

Tuesday, Feb 16, 2010 at 17:48
Hi Dave.

Thanks for the info.I also have a CF50DC & changed the fan today.

Works great,
Cheers.
Vince
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Follow Up By: Member - Trackker (QLD) - Tuesday, Feb 23, 2010 at 16:12

Tuesday, Feb 23, 2010 at 16:12
Gidday Vince, It works well doesn't it. Every one that sees/hears my fridge wants one too. Did you replace with the 120mm

Cheers, Dave
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Follow Up By: Member - Vince B (NSW) - Tuesday, Feb 23, 2010 at 16:29

Tuesday, Feb 23, 2010 at 16:29
Hi Dave.
Sure did.The fan is noiser however can't hear it over the noisy diesel. LOL

Cheers.
Vince
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Reply By: Member - Trackker (QLD) - Tuesday, Jan 05, 2010 at 16:01

Tuesday, Jan 05, 2010 at 16:01
It was all very easy, I started by taking the cover off and removing the fan, swapped over the rubber grommets and threaded inserts for screws, put the new fan in place and soldered the new wires to old. It really works well

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Follow Up By: Member - Allan B (QLD) - Tuesday, Jan 05, 2010 at 16:30

Tuesday, Jan 05, 2010 at 16:30
Good one Dave, for the extra 100mA it should be a great improvement.

Those fans, both the original and your replacement, only act on about 25% of the condenser area but there is no alternative due to space limitations. Of course the air also cools the compressor and your increased flow will help that too.

Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Member - Cantiva Clay (NSW) - Wednesday, Jan 06, 2010 at 21:47

Wednesday, Jan 06, 2010 at 21:47
Good photos Dave - This looks like a good project - I will try this to.
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Follow Up By: Member - Cantiva Clay (NSW) - Wednesday, Jan 06, 2010 at 22:40

Wednesday, Jan 06, 2010 at 22:40
Just having another look at the photo the old fan has a little green thing which I suspect is a thermistor - so if its mounted downstream it will adjust the fan speed for heat from the coils, so meaning the fan doesn't waste power when its not needed however I have only seen thermistor fans in 80mm, i think but will investigate.
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Follow Up By: Member - Trackker (QLD) - Thursday, Jan 07, 2010 at 07:38

Thursday, Jan 07, 2010 at 07:38
Cantiva, I reckon your right about the thermistor. They are available in different sizes. I did not worry about it too much as I am only drawing an extra 0.1 amp and it could be one more thing to go wrong. The above 120mm fan is quite noisy so I would not recommend it for a caravan fridge. For this I would recommend maybe a higher flow 90mm fan. I am thinking how a variable speed fan may go so you can operate on the lower quieter speed and when needed flick a switch and let it rip. Or 2 smaller fans with a switch between them to bring on the second fan when needed. cheers, Dave
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Follow Up By: Member - Mike DID - Thursday, Jan 07, 2010 at 10:03

Thursday, Jan 07, 2010 at 10:03
The original installation is quite inefficient because air takes the path of least resistance - it just flows from the fan output to the fan input. A little fresh air gets sucked in and a little hot air gets blown outside the enclosure.

I improved efficiency by putting a baffle around the fan. Incoming cool air must flow over the coils and must leave via the grill on the other side, again flowing through the coils.
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Follow Up By: Member - Mike DID - Thursday, Jan 07, 2010 at 10:05

Thursday, Jan 07, 2010 at 10:05
Fan control doesn't really help much - the fridge controller already controls power to the fan so it runs only when needed.

Once you have a baffle in place, you realise that full cooling is useful whenever the compressor is running - the outgoing air is quite hotter than incoming air.
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Follow Up By: trainslux - Tuesday, Jan 19, 2010 at 10:23

Tuesday, Jan 19, 2010 at 10:23
Excellent modification.

I would like to add some ideas to it if I may.

Regarding fan setups like this, you will benefit greatly by adding a form of shroud so that the air has to be drawn thru the condensor, and can not be redrawn from the output side of the fan.

You would be surprised at how much air eddies around the edges of fans from the out to the input side.
Adding a shroud to this setup, so that the air has to go over the condensor, thru the fan, and then out the other side would make a good difference again.

Added benefit of the shroud could be that even tho the fan covers 70% of the condensor, the shroud would improve the airflow over the areas that are not directly behind the fan.

Just thoughts, again, good setup, worthy addition to the fridge.

As an idea, using some windscreen reflective bubble material between the fan and the condensor, with fan sized hole, and sealed to the fan so no air can leak past the fan and shroud would make quite a difference, can you mount the fan back 25mm from the condensor to aid this. The shroud could then be made to fit cleanly out to the edges of the compressor space. One sided self adhesive foam used for door sealing can also be helpful in these applications.

Again, great idea, just wanted to add something to make it better if you have the time.

Trains.
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Follow Up By: Member - Trackker (QLD) - Tuesday, Jan 19, 2010 at 11:03

Tuesday, Jan 19, 2010 at 11:03
Trains, last week we went away with my fan modified CF50 and standard CF 50 and gave them a good run in some hot weather. On the std fridge you can actually feel the hot air "leaking" out of the intake vent and recirculating back to the input side of the fan as you say, so it will definitely help by fitting a shroud around the fan. The modified fridge simply blasts all the air through and out the other side without a problem and does not recirculate any air at all, but it is a DC model with less components inside. When you look inside an AC model I can not see how the air can get past all those obstacles and it is no wonder that it wants to take the path of least resistance as Mike has mentioned above.

We hope to modify the other fridge in the near future and we may incorporate a shroud. We also may install a small circulation fan to supply the dairy section with colder air in the near future so stay tuned. Thanks for your input and if anyone decides to do a mod, if possible could you please supply some pics. Many thanks.
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Reply By: robb1964 - Tuesday, Jan 19, 2010 at 01:31

Tuesday, Jan 19, 2010 at 01:31
Hi all,

I have a Waeco 80 Ltr and thought it performed poorly mounted in an aluminium checker plate box on the draw bar of my trailer using 240V only as have not set up a 12V system as yet. I found there is a three way slide switch near the fridge plug in that has options for Economy/Normal/High. Mine was set to Economy and was struggling to stay cold, will see how it performs on Normal.

Does anyone have any ideas about this switch?

When do you need to use High?

I find my freezer section is freezing but fridge section does not get as cold as you would expect and I always set to -10.

Cheers Rob


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Follow Up By: Member - Trackker (QLD) - Tuesday, Jan 19, 2010 at 08:48

Tuesday, Jan 19, 2010 at 08:48
Rob, if your checkerplate box doesn't have any openings in it to allow cool air to enter and hot air to escape, you will have problems with your fridge and it will always struggle to get cold regardless of your slide switch. If this is the case you may need to modify the box to allow for some air flow. You could try taking it out of the box and run it for a while and if it operates better you will know the cause.

The slide switch is a low battery voltage cut out to protect your battery from being discharged too much. In your manual it will give you the voltages that relates to the 3 positions or you can find it on this forum or on the net. Cheers, Dave
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Reply By: Member - Allan B (QLD) - Tuesday, Jan 19, 2010 at 13:26

Tuesday, Jan 19, 2010 at 13:26
Having added the extra fan I gave the project some more consideration.

The original single fan drew air in from one side, through the condenser, over the compressor, through the other side of the condenser, and out through the vents in the housing. A difficult task for the little fan and the second half of the condenser was receiving the hot air from the first half.

When I initially added the second fan on the opposite side of the condenser I had the choice of fan air direction. It could have simply continued the existing air direction but I didn't think that would help much so I arranged it to also draw air in on that side, over the condenser etc. but did not give much thought to where the hot air would exit the housing. So I took another look at it.

What I have now done is to drill a pattern of 12mm holes in the centre section of the plastic housing for the exit air. Air is now drawn in from each side and out the centre. The air flow has been very much improved as evidenced by a very scientific piece of paper dangled in front of the exit holes.


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It was necessary to be aware of the circuit board attached to the inside of the moulding shown in Image 2.


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With the circuit board removed the mounting posts can be seen in Image 3 and the holes were positioned to avoid these.


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Image 4 shows what lies behind the housing moulding in this area.



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It was a brave move to get stuck into drilling the housing and I would only recommend doing it if you are confident. Certainly remove the housing moulding from the fridge body and dismount the attached internal circuit board before proceeding.

Only field use under desert conditions will really tell if this has been a significant improvement but I am confident.




Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Member - Trackker (QLD) - Tuesday, Jan 19, 2010 at 14:14

Tuesday, Jan 19, 2010 at 14:14
Thanks Allan, what an excellent improvement and good pics. I am sure you will see the benefits of improved cooling and as you say the other side of the condenser coils also directly recieve cold air, it just makes sense. And for people using fridges in quite hot regions, IMO some cooling modification is a must otherwise you will most likely flog your fridge and batteries a bit too hard. Cheers, Dave
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Follow Up By: Member - Allan B (QLD) - Tuesday, Jan 19, 2010 at 17:47

Tuesday, Jan 19, 2010 at 17:47
Just taken some measurements which may be interesting.

Waeco 35 litre.
Ambient in my workshop: 36c
Temp in fridge: -4c
Run time: 6m 40sec
Off time: 6m 20sec
Running current: 3.6A

So, near enough to a 50% duty cycle which means it averages 1.8A under these conditions. Probably better during cooler night hours. Probably worse if fridge is being opened to get stuff out.

So, my 110Ah battery discharged to 60% SOC will run this fridge for about 24 hours. Adequate for my style, but only just. I will either hafta keep the vehicle moving or get some solar gear!

Pity I didn't take some measurements before I did the mods for comparison.

Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: greybeard - Tuesday, Jan 19, 2010 at 18:55

Tuesday, Jan 19, 2010 at 18:55
i did some experementation with a 2 way supercheap fridge a while ago.
kept records of various fan positions and cycle times.
if you've got the time, as a quick test relocate the fans temporarily onto the outside cover. ie bolt them onto the outside of the box and direct the air into the box.

it should make a noticable improvement on the duty cycle for a couple of reasons.
1/ you'll be blowing cool air across the condensor ( not hot air from inside the compressor compartment.
2/ you'll have some baffle effect. when i did my experiments a gap of a couple of mm made a significant difference to the amount of cold air as opposed to recycled hot air blowing through the fan. i was amazed at the difference it made. the improvement in duty cycle was noticeable.

what did need more work was the noise it made as the case acted like a drum.

not sure how much room there is between the condensor coils and the case. ie if a fan could be fitted there or not.
fan test results
see results for tests 5 & 6


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Follow Up By: trainslux - Tuesday, Jan 19, 2010 at 22:42

Tuesday, Jan 19, 2010 at 22:42
Some interesting approaches to providing more air flow.

One thing I would be considering is this.
Air flow over the condensor where its behind the compressor, and near the cabinet.

Would it be better form to have the 2nd fan same side as the original one, but placed right up against the cabinet fixed to the outside cover, so that in effect, it blows air down the side of the cabinet and condensor, and provides a bit more air to the current fan.
The benefit of drawing clear air from outside by sealed/ baffled fan has already been mentioned, and proven above too with the supercheap unit.
Just a thought, I too enjoying getting the most out of things, and its always good to get the most out of your battery by an efficient fridge.

Trains
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Reply By: Member - Trackker (QLD) - Saturday, Jan 30, 2010 at 09:01

Saturday, Jan 30, 2010 at 09:01
I have finally installed another fan mod to my CF50. The pic below is my test setup and eventually I will draw power from the light supply. It has really worked well and I have the headache to prove it. It is simply a small fan glued onto some pipe and draws air from coldest part of the fridge compartment and directs it into the dairy compartment. It will then flow back over the top of basket and circulating through the rest of the fridge contents. It allows me to have access to drinks without having to rumage around. If you do want to utilise the dairy compartment for its intended use then I suppose you could spin it around so it redirects to the fridge only. Fan is 40mm and pipe is made from bits from a 40mm S+P trap and a 40mm adjustable cap and lining, both from bunnings. Cheers, Dave

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AnswerID: 401713

Reply By: greenant - Thursday, Mar 04, 2010 at 21:24

Thursday, Mar 04, 2010 at 21:24
Hi trackker
I have fitted the same as you i.e. 40mm fan from fridge side to dairy compartment. I decided that the light could go and removed the bulb and in the lens fitted a double pole double throw switch from jaycar. One side of the switch is fed from the two light spade connections and the other I installed two wires + and - dropped down thru the same hole that the light wires use and connected in parallel with the condensor fan. the output side of the switch (middle set of terminals) to a audio plug base mounted in the light lens. The fan has a male plug to suit. This way I now Have the options of fan on/off with the condensor fan (only on while running) or on all the time (via the light power) and can be unplugged to remove the unit from the fridge with the basket. Hope this makes sense

Grennant
AnswerID: 407282

Follow Up By: Member - Trackker (QLD) - Saturday, Mar 06, 2010 at 08:15

Saturday, Mar 06, 2010 at 08:15
Hi Greenant
Thanks for the great ideas. I have been away so I have not yet finished powering my 40mm fan permanently. All makes sense to me and now you have given me some more great ideas. I love the audio plug and to be able to remove the fan and pipe cleanly, so to speak when you dont want it in there.

How did it all go, are you happy with the end result of a colder dairy compartment. I reckon its great, as the dairy compartment has just been wasted space for me. It turns my CF50 into a real 50lt fridge. Cheers, Dave
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FollowupID: 677401

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