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I have found a trick for washing up is to use a large square plastic container with a snap on lid. Buy one big enough to fit your plates. We store the dishwash liquid and a wet sponge/scourer in it.
During the day we put all dirty plates in it from lunch time and smokos. Leave a little soapy water to slosh around and stop the foody bits sticking. Then a big wash up before or after the night time meal. Cargo barriers make for an excellent drying rack for tea towels. May not be super hygenic but a little dirt is good.

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Reply By: Member - joc45 (WA) - Friday, Jan 08, 2010 at 14:20

Friday, Jan 08, 2010 at 14:20
Yep, I do the same.
I fit a smaller rectangular basin inside it for the washup (actually bought an oil catch basin - fitted perfectly inside, tho not used for catching oil :-). With both, I can wash and rinse clothes as well. All my washing-up gear, plus fly spray, laundry powder, etc crammed into the larger lidded box when travelling.
Gerry
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Follow Up By: Member - Cantiva Clay (NSW) - Friday, Jan 08, 2010 at 14:35

Friday, Jan 08, 2010 at 14:35
Eat straight from the can or pot - saves on dishes.....and if your clothes get dirty just turn them inside out and they are clean again!
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Follow Up By: Member - joc45 (WA) - Friday, Jan 08, 2010 at 16:50

Friday, Jan 08, 2010 at 16:50
That's how I used to do it when I was a 20yo!!
A wipe with paper towel used to clean up all the pots, etc!
Yuk!!

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Follow Up By: davmac452 - Saturday, Jan 09, 2010 at 10:12

Saturday, Jan 09, 2010 at 10:12
The old bush washing machine.

Get a large bucket with a snap on lid. Put in dirty clothes, washing powder or liquid, water to just cover clothes. Put lid on securely and drive all day. End of day just rinse and dry.

This usually provides enough agitation to clean most clothes unless they are beyond cleaning. Which some of mine get to.

There was also the story told to me by a coach driver mate of mine, of a regular passenger of his who would do a 28 day trip with only one change of clothes and a stock of jocks/socks, apart from those he was wearing. Every few days in larger towns he would look for an opp shop and buy another set or 2 of clothes. Only ever bought new jocks and socks.

He reckoned it was a cheap way to travel and saved the hassle of lugging big bags and trying to figure out what to take.
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Reply By: Member - Allan B (QLD) - Friday, Jan 08, 2010 at 15:40

Friday, Jan 08, 2010 at 15:40
we also use a plastic container with a snap-on lid. The box stores all the wash-up gear and a wire dish drainer. The dirty lunch plates store in there too until next wash-up. The lid serves as a drainer tray and accepts the wire rack nicely.
We have tried a number of arrangements but this works best yet.

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Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: davmac452 - Saturday, Jan 09, 2010 at 10:03

Saturday, Jan 09, 2010 at 10:03
Hi Allan.

I like the dish rack idea. Had not thought of that. It is a pain finding somewhere cleanish to put the dishes post wash.

dave.
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Follow Up By: Member - Allan B (QLD) - Saturday, Jan 09, 2010 at 10:31

Saturday, Jan 09, 2010 at 10:31
Hi Dave, the rack is a little smaller than the usual. Just fits in the 360 x 360 box. Dunno where we got it from, had it for years. Maybe a camping or caravan store.

Cheers
Allan

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Reply By: the redbacks - Friday, Jan 08, 2010 at 19:02

Friday, Jan 08, 2010 at 19:02
ummm,
i just take the wife !!!!!!!!!!!!!
that also makes me from having to kiss her "goodbye" ???
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