Infrared thermometer

Submitted: Sunday, Jan 10, 2010 at 08:27
ThreadID: 75049 Views:3010 Replies:4 FollowUps:5
This Thread has been Archived
This is one of those new gadgets that someone put me on to a few months ago. Very handy for 4WDs and caravans. You get them from Jaycar or Dick Smith and vary in price from $14 to $400. Mine was middle of the road at about $40 but works great.

Just point at the object you wish to know the temp and it will give a digital read out between -20 and I think 120 degrees C.

I use it for checking the temp of brakes after traveling. Just to make sure one in not significantly higher than any other.

Also very handy for locating, where heat is coming into the caravan annex when set up or where heat is entering the caravan.

Yesterday was a very hot day here. (40) but around 7pm, I ventured outside to check temps. I took the opportunity to roam the caravan park and do a comparison of temp of car depending upon colour. We all know dark is hotter but it was interesting to know exactly how much hotter.

A silver car is no hotter then a white one which I found interesting.

So in short, a very handy product when on the road and no doubt has many uses other than what I have descovered.
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Gone Bush (WA) - Sunday, Jan 10, 2010 at 08:53

Sunday, Jan 10, 2010 at 08:53
Here's one:

Image Could Not Be Found
I'm glad I ain't too scared to be lazy
- Augustus McCrae (Lonesome Dove)

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 398598

Follow Up By: qubert - Sunday, Jan 10, 2010 at 09:27

Sunday, Jan 10, 2010 at 09:27
did you get that at moo moo land too?
0
FollowupID: 667561

Follow Up By: Gone Bush (WA) - Sunday, Jan 10, 2010 at 12:10

Sunday, Jan 10, 2010 at 12:10
Sure did, got there in my ice cream van.....

I'm glad I ain't too scared to be lazy
- Augustus McCrae (Lonesome Dove)

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 667582

Reply By: Member - Josh (TAS) - Sunday, Jan 10, 2010 at 09:06

Sunday, Jan 10, 2010 at 09:06
We used to use them all the time for food temp control. Unless used properly they are very inaccurate. I assume it is a gun type thing you point at the object and pull the trigger, it then gives you the reading. They work off ambient air temp to get the reading of the object so if you have the air conditioning on in the car then take the gun outside into 40 degree heat the reading will be wrong. The ones we used took about half an hour to settle before being accurate again. Same going the other way from hot temp into cold areas. We would often laugh at health inspectors who would drive down with air con on in the car then walk across in 40 degree heat and into our cool room to take a temp with a gun that had just had 3 temp changes in about 30 sec and couldn't work out why in a coolroom at 2 degrees their gun was showing between 25 and 35 degrees on the product. Very handy if you know how to work them to your advantage. We could get a 2 degree reading even though we knew the product was higher. They are very handy units and had never thought of using them for the ideas you have said. I like the idea for brakes or even on shocks after a long drive, sure beats putting your hand on it and finding out it's really hot lol. Would have been handy when we were in Roxy Downs to check temps out there on the ground in 48 degree days, was to hot to touch anything that had been in the sun

Josh
AnswerID: 398601

Follow Up By: qubert - Sunday, Jan 10, 2010 at 09:30

Sunday, Jan 10, 2010 at 09:30
they are not NATA approved so cant be used for 'official' testing and inspecting of anything!
0
FollowupID: 667562

Follow Up By: Member No 1- Sunday, Jan 10, 2010 at 10:12

Sunday, Jan 10, 2010 at 10:12
"they work off ambient air temp" is incorrect and changes in ambient temps during their travels is irrevalent to the measuring system of the infrared sensors

"Unless used properly they are very inaccurate" may also be incorrect...good ones are very accurate if the emissivity value is set correctly.

0
FollowupID: 667569

Follow Up By: Member No 1- Sunday, Jan 10, 2010 at 10:17

Sunday, Jan 10, 2010 at 10:17
the emissivity value can be checked by placing some masking tape on the surface of the substance being tested and the temp measured at 0.95 (i think it is) and then check the actual item being tested and change the emissivity setting to until the device reads the same temp as that of the masking tape
0
FollowupID: 667570

Reply By: Member - John and Val - Sunday, Jan 10, 2010 at 09:51

Sunday, Jan 10, 2010 at 09:51
Carl - these things don't actually measure temperature. They measure the amount of heat energy being radiated. That is dependent on both the temperature and the emissivity of the radiator. Emissivity varies widely, so the accuracy as a temperature measuring device is pretty awful.

They are good for comparative measurements such as comparing the temperature of two similar things - your caravan wheels for example. Comparing the temperature of 2 different coloured cars though isn't so good. The cars will absorb different amounts of heat from the sun because of the colour differences and so they will have different temperatures, but emissivity of the 2 colours in the infrared may be quite unpredictable.

Keeping in mind the emissivity issue though, they can be very useful.


John
J and V
"Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted."
- Albert Einstein

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 398611

Reply By: Bob of KAOS - Sunday, Jan 10, 2010 at 13:23

Sunday, Jan 10, 2010 at 13:23
Or you could hide behind a roadside tree and frighten the .... out of passing motorists.
AnswerID: 398649

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (14)