Great Ocean Road

Submitted: Sunday, Jan 17, 2010 at 22:30
ThreadID: 75289 Views:2759 Replies:5 FollowUps:7
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Drove it yesterday for the first time in a few years.

The tourists! I'm not one of course. I was a traveller attending my Aunty's 80th birthday at Port Fairy.

So... we stopped to stretch our legs and see how many of the 12 apostles were still standing.

Bumping, shoulder to shoulder all the way out to viewing platforms. A couple of paler looking, not camera toting people passed us, but most were not. Even the paler looking people had American accents.

I'm not knocking them. Lovely to see overseas visitors enjoying our special sites/sights. I just rather miss the dirt track we walked down with mum and dad in 1960s. We stood on London Bridge and leaned over Loch Ard Gorge. Not a soul to be seen in any direction. Pristine.

Global warming? No ... overpopulation. There are just so many people around nowadays. ...sigh



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Reply By: Dave B ( BHQ NSW) - Sunday, Jan 17, 2010 at 23:34

Sunday, Jan 17, 2010 at 23:34
Royce, I thought you were going to tell us how many apostles were still standing.

Dave
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Follow Up By: Member - Royce- Monday, Jan 18, 2010 at 09:39

Monday, Jan 18, 2010 at 09:39
Counted 8 before the jostling and making way for happy snaps wore thin....
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Follow Up By: Mad Cowz (VIC) - Monday, Jan 18, 2010 at 22:44

Monday, Jan 18, 2010 at 22:44
Regarding the Apostles, some locals suggest there are still 13, just depends on where you look and from what angle. People rarely stay there beyond sunset to see mainland Australia's biggest Penguin parade.
Surely you drove onto london bridge in the 1960s??? I believe you were allowed to then.... it has been down since 1991 I think, trapped 2 people on it.

How are ya dave? regards to nora

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Reply By: Member - Old Girl (QLD) - Sunday, Jan 17, 2010 at 23:54

Sunday, Jan 17, 2010 at 23:54
We turned up there a little over 12 months ago. We too did that walk and all the others. But the apostles bit at 6 in the morning. Hardly anybody about. As we walked along many tracks I was thinking gee I wish I could have seen this years ago before all the barriers and walk ways were installed. Its the way it is every where.
Im guessing 7 left.
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Reply By: Matt Watson - Monday, Jan 18, 2010 at 00:52

Monday, Jan 18, 2010 at 00:52
Best way to see Loch Ard Gorge is 60 feet under. Did a dive there years ago, was spectacular.. hardly any tourists down there... did fine some binoculars though! :)
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Reply By: JAZZY - Monday, Jan 18, 2010 at 09:29

Monday, Jan 18, 2010 at 09:29
We travelled along the Great Ocean Road in October last year (pre Christmas School Holidays) and found it spectacular. Loved Loch Ard Gorge and the history behind it.

And, not a lot of people around, mainly middle age/old travellers like ourselves. We stay away from school holidays for exactly that reason.

I guess if you have to travel during that time you have to expect a population explosion of the tourist kind.
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Reply By: Member - Timbo - Monday, Jan 18, 2010 at 13:42

Monday, Jan 18, 2010 at 13:42
Royce, have you visited Ayers Rock lately? Or the Three Sisters (Blue Mountains)?! These attractions have become world-famous and therefore attract visitors from all over the world...

But what about you... have you ever been overseas and visited an icon? Did you stop to think how the locals might feel about 'all these foreign tourists'?! LOL.

Personally, I find the attitudes of some on this forum to be haughty and selfish: "I want to go and visit/enjoy all these great places, but God forbid that other people should be allowed the same priviledge." Don't you ever stop to think that just by being there you're providing another set of shoulders for everyone else to bump into out there on the viewing platforms?! It seems many forumites (yes, here!) just want everyone else to permanently stay at home and let them spend their life touring this great country alone...

If you haven't already, perhaps you should take a trip overseas and see some major tourist attraction (eg. in SE Asia), then you can come back and be thankful that there's enough space to put your hands on your hips! Or that you have a reasonable chance of returning to your car with your wallet, camera, etc. still in your pocket! Or that you're not constantly accosted by people shoving souvenirs in your face urging you to buy from them? Or that you could drive about 5min down/up the road from most of our major tourist attactions and find the solitude that you so eagerly desire. We have stacks to be thankful for in Australia, but it seems there are many who really aren't thankful.
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Follow Up By: Member - Old Girl (QLD) - Monday, Jan 18, 2010 at 13:59

Monday, Jan 18, 2010 at 13:59
Hello Timbo, I thought Royce was just reminiscing the old days. With out old stories young ones like me ha ha can only imagine what it was like back then. When travelling I've got the kids into looking for old roads the way it was once other wise they would never know.

Cheers
Sharon
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Follow Up By: bruce - Monday, Jan 18, 2010 at 15:29

Monday, Jan 18, 2010 at 15:29
Timbo must have what is known as S O L today...this is the 2nd thread that I have read that he has had a shot at someone just making an observation in general...yes the good old days , but Timbo probably does not know about them...cheers
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Follow Up By: Member - Timbo - Monday, Jan 18, 2010 at 15:56

Monday, Jan 18, 2010 at 15:56
Old Girl - I'm sure Royce is reminiscing. I recently purchased the Leyland Bros DVD of their original Weat-East Crossing and a lot has changed, some due to the inspiration provided by their DVD/video.

Bruce - not trying to make a shot at anyone specifically, but have read a few threads/comments in the past few weeks from people complaining that they have to share their favourite places with other people who also happen to like the same places. Some would be happy for the others that they can enjoy it too, or happy to meet someone with similar interests, but it seems to be becoming increasingly common to hear people implying they have more right to exist/travel/live than other people. It's wearing a bit thin... and personally, I find it rather offensive.
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Follow Up By: Member - Royce- Monday, Jan 18, 2010 at 16:16

Monday, Jan 18, 2010 at 16:16
Yes Timbo... you have me pegged.

I am often haughty and selfish... but a hellova nice bloke none the less.

I understood what I was saying and certainly get your point. If I hadn't been visiting my aunty I would have done the trip in winter.

I travel in Tassie with my show during winter often and love it because there are few tourists. As I travel around Oz I usually see myself as a 'traveller' rather than tourist. I tend to avoid the tourist spots... and in the meanwhile get to see the most wonderful things!

I'm guilty of climbing Le Tour Eiffel, and went to see those big rocks in England. However now I come to think of it... we still didn't do the typical tourist bit. We looked through the fence at Stone Henge, didn't like the crowds and went up the road to 'Wood Henge' .. way older and luckily for us undergoing an archealogical dig. Got to talk with the boffins and see real history.

I would selfishly like to go back 40 years with half the population and have wild remote areas to myself a bit more.

Yours in haughtiness [and naughtiness].
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Follow Up By: Member - Timbo - Monday, Jan 18, 2010 at 16:56

Monday, Jan 18, 2010 at 16:56
LOL, thanks Royce!

I agree with you when you say "As I travel around Oz I usually see myself as a 'traveller' rather than tourist. I tend to avoid the tourist spots... and in the meanwhile get to see the most wonderful things!" I also don't enjoy the over-commericalised tourist destinations, but perhaps more for the money-grabbing than the tourists - I spent an afternoon and the next whole day at Ayers Rock (after travelling through the relative solitude of Dalhousie Springs and Chambers Pillar) and then couldn't get out of there quick enough! I also like to take photos of scenery without people in them (something I had to give up on at Taj Mahal! LOL!). It's good to find a quiet campsite to enjoy the natural surroundings, but if someone else wants to enjoy it also, I don't see why I should claim any more right to it than them (but if we're here to enjoy the natural surroundings, leave your radio switched off - or on just quietly!). And you might just get some great travel advice over a cold drink and campfire enjoyed with another like-minded traveller...

"I would selfishly like to go back 40 years with half the population and have wild remote areas to myself a bit more."
Well, surely you must admit that more people visiting some of these places has made them more accessible and better serviced. It's now easy sealed road all the way to Ayers Rock. If you're in the Simpson and something goes wrong, you'll be unlikely to die before being found (not that we should rely on other people, but you can't plan/provide for every possible disaster). And you're unlikely to be stuck in Innamincka for a month or more waiting for flooded rivers to recede (thanks to the Burke & Wills bridge). There are SOME advantages (even if bitumen all the way to Ayers Rock is a debatable 'advantage'!) to having more people contributing to the Federal Treasury... :-)
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