What does off mean?????????????????????

Submitted: Monday, Jan 25, 2010 at 19:02
ThreadID: 75480 Views:3563 Replies:11 FollowUps:32
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I don't get it.

If a bloke is selling a set of 4wd tyres.... it's advertized as 4 "off"

Off what??!!

Or an awning.... one "off"... huh?

Looking at this container on ebay.

The bloke has light switches that are 'off'..... is this some sort of wierd way of say 'of'... like 'I've got 4 of those tyres'?

It irritates me as much as ect.....
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Reply By: Member - Damien L (Cairns) - Monday, Jan 25, 2010 at 19:09

Monday, Jan 25, 2010 at 19:09
G'day Royce, I agree with you on that, My big beef is when people use the "then" when they should use "than" and visa versa.
Damien
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Follow Up By: Member - Graham H (QLD) - Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 10:54

Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 10:54
Bricks and glass houses come to mind.


Its vice versa as per here

http://www.answers.com/topic/vice-versa



LOL

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Follow Up By: Member - Damien L (Cairns) - Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 11:54

Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 11:54
Thanks for the correction Graham, not thinking.
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Follow Up By: Member - Graham H (QLD) - Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 12:39

Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 12:39
Ha ha Have to be careful

Too much of one sort and one could end up with parts crushed in the other


LOL
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Reply By: Member - Timbo - Monday, Jan 25, 2010 at 19:14

Monday, Jan 25, 2010 at 19:14
Royce, architects tend to number things like that in their documentation - not sure where it comes from. Probably some old tradition that no one remembers the origin of anymore... perhaps something like numbering off?!
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Follow Up By: Busy Bee - Wednesday, Jan 27, 2010 at 00:21

Wednesday, Jan 27, 2010 at 00:21
You're right, years ago inventories and the like always used "off" like that but I never figured out the reasoning.
It probably explains why a rare event is a "one off".
I'll bugger off now.
The only time I made a mistake was when I thought I was wrong, but I was mistaken.

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Reply By: The Boss - Monday, Jan 25, 2010 at 19:28

Monday, Jan 25, 2010 at 19:28
Probably worth just messaging him and asking what he means. That way you get the truth straight from the horses mouth.
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Reply By: landed eagle - Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 07:53

Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 07:53
It's a throw back to a different era. My first job was in a glazing business back in the early eighties. Plenty of old timers would order "2 off 300 X 300mm" etc .Most of the now retired glaziers would write multiple sizes down the same way.
Lots of plans from Architerrorists would be noted the same way.
Don't see it quite so often now, but it's hard to stop writing it that way when drummed into you as a young lad.
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Follow Up By: Alloy c/t - Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 08:24

Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 08:24
2 off ?? sure you dont mean 2 of ?? 2 people got OFF the train , I have 2 panes OF glass.
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Follow Up By: landed eagle - Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 08:44

Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 08:44
No mate that's how they noted sizes. I've been in the industry for 30 years next year and it still pops up. Don't know why, it's just the way some of the tradies and architerrorists do it.
It will be asked for as 2 panes OF glass but written down as 2 off 300 x 300.
I do see 2 @ 300 x 300 a bit these days too which I prefer myself.
No wonder the English language is regarded as a difficult one to learn as a second language,with all these abberrations.
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Follow Up By: Hairy (NT) - Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 09:55

Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 09:55
Gday,
Yeah I learnt the same as a Boilermaker/Welder.
It was always 2 off at 300 etc.....may be because you were cutting 300mm pieces "OFF" a 6m length?

Cheres
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Follow Up By: Member - Timbo - Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 15:53

Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 15:53
Architerrorists?! Ha ha, that's a good one - my colleagues will enjoy that! What's your involvement in the industry? Obviously not a, er, design consultant!
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Follow Up By: landed eagle - Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 16:41

Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 16:41
15 years in flat glass industry. Now I specialize in the restoration and construction of leadlight and stained glass windows. Also make kiln- formed toughened glass for showers,kitchens ,doorways etc. Been doing this for last 14 yrs.
I have dealt with a lot of 'architerrorists' in my years. Most are good blokes,but every now and then you come across one that makes you wonder......."jeees mate,you went to Uni to study this and muggins here can see that ain't gonna work".
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Follow Up By: Hairy (NT) - Wednesday, Jan 27, 2010 at 03:17

Wednesday, Jan 27, 2010 at 03:17
Uni?...Muggins?..... sounds like a Harry Potter movie Hahahahahahaha LOL
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Follow Up By: landed eagle - Wednesday, Jan 27, 2010 at 07:34

Wednesday, Jan 27, 2010 at 07:34
The word you are looking for is muggLE ,just to clear that up for any Harry Potter fans. :)
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Follow Up By: Member - Timbo - Wednesday, Jan 27, 2010 at 13:19

Wednesday, Jan 27, 2010 at 13:19
LE, I know what you mean - as a QS we seem to get to deal with the latter types more often than not. Our biggest worries are discrepancies in the documents and incomplete information.

I can't complain too much though, some of my subjects in uni were combined with 'architerrorists-in-training' and just by submitting something
(even basic) for each assessment you were way above average in the class!
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Reply By: DIO - Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 10:57

Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 10:57
I consider one of the most annoying desecrations of grammar as the use of 'these ones' - initially used be media in the eastern states and now wide spread. I was always trained to use the correct/appropriate word when communicating (helps prevent mis-understanding and confusion).
What's so difficult about 'This one' 'That one' if more than one 'these'

Instead of 'these ones' referring to numerous cars, the correct grammar would be 'these cars' or 'those cars'. Placing the letter 's' onto the end of the word 'one' does not, never has nor never will make it into a plural word (more than one).

My other gripe relates to the use of ye/no or no/yes in the same context. So many sports people when interviewed answer a question with yes/no or comment with yes/no. Since when did a positive (yes) and a negative (no) ever go together in constructing an intelligent statement. Perhaps most are rugby players hence no need for intelligence in any comment they may make.
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Follow Up By: Member - Ed C (QLD) - Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 12:25

Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 12:25
Yeah, but aay................

;-))


Confucius say.....
"He who lie underneath automobile with tool in hand,
....Not necessarily mechanic!!"

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Follow Up By: Mark S (cns) - Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 20:30

Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 20:30
"...........initially used be media in the eastern states ..." That would be BY the media

then you say "....I was always trained to use the correct/appropriate word when communicating ...."

Wouldn't normally follow up, but it's DIO!!!

LOL (is it ok to use LOL, or is that a gripe?)
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Follow Up By: fisho64 - Wednesday, Jan 27, 2010 at 23:54

Wednesday, Jan 27, 2010 at 23:54
of course he will reappear from the mist to correct his mistake-NOT (whoops!)

Wasnt aware that "mis-understanding" was hyphenated, Ive learnded summit knew
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Reply By: Member - Graham H (QLD) - Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 18:10

Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 18:10
One of my biggest gripes is the use of the word got.

As in I have got 6 eggs. We have got coming up as most Tv presenters say

Why got I have 6 eggs is enough. We have, coming up etc..

You can say I went to the shop and got some eggs, then you have them.

Better to say I went to the shop and bought some eggs.

My old English teacher would smack us on the knuckles with a ruler if we used got in a sentence when it wasn't required.

Also I seen an old Holden the other day.

I SAW an old Holden the other day.

DUEL batteries. Are they fighting DUAL thank you.

There are several people not THEIR

They're going away. Not there going away or their going away.

Don't they teach English any more.

As far as this thread is concerned I would suggest that 4 of is more correct as he is selling an item not getting something made.

Cheers


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Follow Up By: Member - Graham H (QLD) - Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 18:15

Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 18:15
Woops, missed 2 commas and a full stop.

I shall beat myself with a wet bus ticket.


LOL
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Follow Up By: Member - Andrew (QLD) - Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 18:36

Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 18:36
It is almost as bad as those who use the word woops when it is whoops. LOL

Andrew
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Follow Up By: Member - Graham H (QLD) - Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 18:49

Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 18:49
Good try.http://www.thefreedictionary.com/woops


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Follow Up By: Member - Andrew (QLD) - Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 19:38

Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 19:38
oh, i see your signature line. LOL

Have a good day Graham.

Andrew
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 19:47

Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 19:47
Or ... the use of the word 'what' ie: ... It's colder than what it was yesterday.

Should be: It's colder than it was yesterday.
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Follow Up By: That Troopy Bloke (SA) - Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 23:22

Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 23:22
Quote: "My old English teacher would smack us on the knuckles with a ruler if we used got in a sentence when it wasn't required."

Seems that "old teacher" wasn't too fussed about punctuation though.


People....glass houses....stones :-)

Cheers
Glenn
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Follow Up By: Member Brian (Gold Coast) - Wednesday, Jan 27, 2010 at 08:48

Wednesday, Jan 27, 2010 at 08:48
My pet hate is 'me' in place of 'my'. As in, "pass ME keys please", instead of "pass MY keys please"... or "ME tent is set up, now I can have a beer" instead of "MY tent is set up, now I can have a beer".

Almost everyone uses it. It drives me crazy!!

Cheers

Brian
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Follow Up By: fisho64 - Wednesday, Jan 27, 2010 at 23:57

Wednesday, Jan 27, 2010 at 23:57
'me' in place of 'my'

thats accepted english now, you are gonna have ta get yoused 2 it!
Or else continue to speak using "thou" etc etc otherwise you also will be guilty of grammatical terrorism!!

:-)
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Follow Up By: Member Brian (Gold Coast) - Thursday, Jan 28, 2010 at 07:30

Thursday, Jan 28, 2010 at 07:30
"fisho64 posted:
'me' in place of 'my'

thats accepted english now, you are gonna have ta get yoused 2 it!
Or else continue to speak using "thou" etc etc otherwise you also will be guilty of grammatical terrorism!!

:-)"

Not in MY house it ain't!! LOL......


;-))


Cheers

Brian
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Reply By: Off-track - Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 19:15

Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 19:15
And yet you misspelled 'etc'.

lol :-)
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Follow Up By: Member - Graham H (QLD) - Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 20:02

Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 20:02
Not according to my Collins English Dictionary.

It give etc. as short for et cetera.

Cheers
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Follow Up By: Off-track - Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 21:51

Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 21:51
Might want to re-read the original post...lol.
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Follow Up By: Member - Royce- Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 23:53

Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 23:53
Um... yep you might like to read the original post .... that is one of the things that upset me "ect" instead of etc !
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Follow Up By: Off-track - Wednesday, Jan 27, 2010 at 20:52

Wednesday, Jan 27, 2010 at 20:52
Aaahh, haha!
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Reply By: ob - Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 19:24

Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 19:24
Dose any off yous gise no how tuh spel p-e-n-d-a-n-t-i-c plese!!!/?

lol

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Follow Up By: Shaker - Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 19:48

Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 19:48
If you mean p-e-d-a-n-t-i-c, then yes we do!
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Follow Up By: landed eagle - Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 20:19

Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 20:19
Wen I went to skool I learned english real proper like.
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Reply By: fisho64 - Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 22:51

Tuesday, Jan 26, 2010 at 22:51
If a bloke is selling a set of 4wd tyres.... it's advertized as 4 "off"

Off what??!!


Maybe you stopped reading too quick and he was writing "4 off -- road tyres"

:-)
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Reply By: Geoff (Newcastle, NSW) - Wednesday, Jan 27, 2010 at 21:05

Wednesday, Jan 27, 2010 at 21:05
Hi Royce,
I know it sounds a bit odd but from my experience it's an engineering come quantity surveying type terminology.

It certainly lacks ambiguity, anyone who reads it knows exactly your intended quantity.

4 off 250 x 250 x 6 window glass is less ambiguous than,

4 x 250 x 250 x 6 plate steel!
Which is the quantity and which is the dimensions? Do you want 250 pieces of steel 250 x 6 x 4 or 6 pieces of steel 250 x 250 x 4 or 4 pieces of steel 250 x 250 x 6?

Geoff

Geoff,
Landcruiser HDJ78,
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Reply By: Mattyhammer - Wednesday, Jan 27, 2010 at 23:48

Wednesday, Jan 27, 2010 at 23:48
I must admit I'm finding it very amusing to view all these posts. Everyone is correcting each other on their mistakes or using this post to have their gripe on the use of the English language and nearly all these people have stuffed something up themselves. LOL!!!

Their/There/They're

Then/Than

Crotch/Crutch

This could go on forever.

Follow the advice of a previous poster and ring the dude selling the "4 off" tyres and ask him!!!
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Follow Up By: Mattyhammer - Wednesday, Jan 27, 2010 at 23:50

Wednesday, Jan 27, 2010 at 23:50
I knew I'd do it..... 'and nearly all OF these people....'.
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Follow Up By: Rob! - Thursday, Jan 28, 2010 at 10:22

Thursday, Jan 28, 2010 at 10:22
Don't you mean OFF?
:)
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