240 Volt inlet on a Cruiser 100

Submitted: Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 14:02
ThreadID: 75930 Views:4300 Replies:13 FollowUps:31
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If I was to permanently have an Inverter on board (as well as a Battery Charger) how, where could the inlet socket be mounted out of the weather????

It would have to be installed by a sparkie no doubt.

Regards

JD
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Reply By: Lex M (Brisbane) - Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 14:10

Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 14:10
An inverter input is 12 volts. What do you really want to know?
AnswerID: 403609

Reply By: Moose - Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 14:34

Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 14:34
An inverter is wired up to the battery. DIY job. What 240v inlet socket are you on about?
AnswerID: 403620

Reply By: Member - Timbo - Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 14:40

Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 14:40
Perhaps you want to know about an outlet socket? Either way, there are IP rated (ingress protection rated) outlets and inlets that you will see on most caravans that are suitable for outdoor use (as in the case of caravans!) - the outlets usually have a cover over them to stop rubbish getting into the holes/slots.

240v wiring should be done only by licensed sparkie but bear in mind that unless you're going to be driving an earth stake into the ground every time you use the external outlet, you should only use appliances that come with 2-pin plugs (ie. not devices supplied with 3-pin plugs).
AnswerID: 403624

Follow Up By: oldtrack123 - Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 20:26

Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 20:26
Hi Timbo

Re:""240v wiring should be done only by licensed sparkie but bear in mind that unless you're going to be driving an earth stake into the ground every time you use the external outlet, you should only use appliances that come with 2-pin plugs (ie. not devices supplied with 3-pin plugs).""


An earth stake is neither required or recommened with ANY portable /small inverter or generator.
It serves no usefull function & adds nothing in the way of protection.
Correct re using only equipment that does not require an earth connection. However it is relatively safe to use /have connected only one devise which requires an earth connection.
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Follow Up By: Member - Timbo - Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 20:34

Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 20:34
I respectfully disagree. The owners manual that came with my DSE Inverter said that you must have an earth if you are using devices that require an earth (ie. devices with 3-pin plug).

The owners manual advised:
* If using devices inside the car, the earth lug on the back of the invertor should be connected to the vehicle body (I know member Graham will not like that in case you have an accident and someone needs to rescue you from the vehicle).
* If using devices outside the car, the earth lug should be connected to an earth stake which must be driven at least X m into the ground (can't remember the actual figure but it didn't really matter because I only used it for 2-pin devices for charging small batteries - ie. AA's and mobile phone batteries)
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Follow Up By: Member - Timbo - Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 20:38

Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 20:38
If doing a permanent installation of an invertor, you're probably better off fitting an earth-leakage detecting (or RCD: residual current device) circuit breaker in the circuit. These constantly measure the current on both terminals and if there is a difference of more than 20 or 30mA, they automatically break the circuit immediately (I think 50mA is fatal, so it is below that threshold)
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Follow Up By: oldtrack123 - Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 22:00

Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 22:00
Hi Timbo
RE*
If using devices inside the car, the earth lug on the back of the inverter should be connected to the vehicle body "
* If using devices outside the car, the earth lug should be connected to an earth stake which must be driven at least X m into the ground (can't remember the actual figure but it didn't really matter because

Sorry, but THAT is not correct for Australia.
The As /NZS [standards] 3001:2008 covers this & specifically says that portable gennys & inverters "Do not need ,nor is it recommended that an earth stake be used"

There are good reasons for not having an earth stake with these portables.
It serves no useful purpose with a fully isolated genny or inverter.
Nor should it be deliberately connected to vehicle frame.



Re:
"If doing a permanent installation of an inverter, you're probably better off fitting an earth-leakage detecting (or RCD: residual current device) circuit breaker in the circuit. These constantly measure the current on both terminals and if there is a difference of more than 20 or 30mA, they automatically break the circuit immediately ""

I would strongly advise against anyone who is not FULLY conversant with the requirements attempting to fit an RCD to a fully isolated genny or inverter
Some may not be suitable

ForTHE RCD TO FUNCTION CORRECTLY THE SOURCE HAS TO BE CHANGED FROM FULLY ISOLATED TO AN EARTH NEUTRAL SYYSTEM.
There again are VERY specific rules as to how this MUST be done.

Many electricians may not be aware of these rules, But again covered in above standards
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Follow Up By: Member - Timbo - Thursday, Feb 11, 2010 at 12:14

Thursday, Feb 11, 2010 at 12:14
Fair enough - I can't remember when I purchased my invertor, but it was a few years before that standard was introduced (2008).
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Reply By: Honky - Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 15:39

Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 15:39
It may be worthwhile to get a weatherproof cover over a double pole powerpoint as used in caravans
AnswerID: 403632

Reply By: _gmd_pps - Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 15:53

Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 15:53
why do you guys even bother to answer when you not even read the original post properly ? but thats nothing new here I guess...

Treading Lightly

you can purchase a 240V inlet from any caravan parts supplier. The downside is that they are all 15Amp inlets, so you will want a 10am to 15am adapter which is illegal but can be done easy or you use a 15 amp cable to run the charger.

The question is if you want access from outside or not.
I have the inlet in my truck bed but on the camper its outside.
I does not matter because the inlets have the proper IPF rating for outdoor use.
I suggest you use stainless steel screws to mount the socket. I would place it underneath - out of sight on a mounting bracket fixed onto the chassis.

good luck
gmd
AnswerID: 403636

Follow Up By: Lex M (Brisbane) - Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 16:08

Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 16:08
I have read the post carefully and properly and don't understand the question. Two other responders likewise. What do you know that we dont?

The question I see is "If I was to permanently have an Inverter on board how, where could the inlet socket be mounted out of the weather????


The inlet to an inverter is 12 volt.
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Follow Up By: Nomadic Navara - Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 17:11

Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 17:11
As far as I can see the others made a fair attempt to read the question and were just as confused as I. We need further info before we can answer the question without leading him up the garden path. There is no good trying to second guess him and leading in the wrong direction.
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Follow Up By: fisho64 - Thursday, Feb 11, 2010 at 23:36

Thursday, Feb 11, 2010 at 23:36
gmd_pps seems to think its a transformer not an inverter he is talking about.
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Follow Up By: Alloy c/t - Friday, Feb 12, 2010 at 10:14

Friday, Feb 12, 2010 at 10:14
Read correctly , " also a 240v battery charger" , ergo he wants a permanent 240v inlet to the vehicle on the outside and a 240v socket inside the vehicle to plug the batt charger into...........
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Reply By: _gmd_pps - Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 16:52

Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 16:52
Read the heading .. its pretty clear

240V Inlet goes to 240 battery charger goes to 12V battery goes to 240 inverter.
If this is not correct then the term inlet was used wrongfully.
have fun
gmd
AnswerID: 403643

Follow Up By: _gmd_pps - Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 16:53

Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 16:53
wrong button sorry
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Reply By: Member - John and Val - Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 17:18

Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 17:18
Treading Lightly -

As others have said, your question is hard to interpret. This is generating a lot of heat but not much enlightenment!

I think you're proposing to install an inverter to supply 240 volts from your 12 volt battery, and are asking where to install the OUTLET (NOT inlet) socket. Is that what you're asking ????

Or are you looking to bring 240 volt power INTO the vehicle from outside to power the charger????

Is the socket you refer to for INLET or an OUTLET???

These are two very different things. If you can clarify, we can probably be much more helpful.

For what its worth - I would not have ANY 240 volt plugs or sockets permanently mounted outside the vehicle. This is dangerous stuff and if you must do it, try to keep the connections inside the vehicle out of the reach of water and mud.

HTH

John
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AnswerID: 403645

Follow Up By: Member - Roachie (SA) - Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 20:52

Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 20:52
Treading Lightly posted his question @ 13:32 on 10/2/2010.....IE: about 7 or so hours ago.

He/she worded it in such an ambiguous way that the natives who have responded to date, are getting their collective knickers in a twist...hahaha

I'm almost tempted to say that "Treading Lightly" is being a bit of trol and is conspicuous by his/her absence in any of the follow-ups.

FWIW.... I have "illegally" wired the canopy of my Patrol up with a caravan-style 240v inlet. On the inside of the canopy, I have BOTH the active and neutral cables going to side-by-side circuit breakers, prior to heading off to a double GPO. This double GPO has 2 appliances permanently plugged in to it; my 40 litre Engel and my 15amp 3 stage battery charger.

The battery charger has 2 outgoing circuits....which is good because I have 2 separate battery banks (one has a single Fullriver AGM battery, the other has a pair of Supercharge Gold starter batteries). The Fullriver's main job is to provide power to the Engel (when the 240 is disconnected), but it also has a 8 gauge (I think that's the correct term) cable that goes through a couple of rubber grommets, from the canopy into the back of the dual cab's seating area, where it powers a 600w inverter, the Barret 550 HF radio and a few other small items.

It all works very well and so far, I haven't managed to give myself a new hairstyle!!!! hahahaha

Roachie
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Follow Up By: Rossco td105 - Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 21:24

Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 21:24
Thanks Roachie,

Your setup sounds like it functions as itended...

Guess we may/may not see if that was the required answer!

Cheers.
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Reply By: Rossco td105 - Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 18:54

Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 18:54
Hi all,

I read this as; If you were to arrive at a caravan park, and wanted to plug the vehicle into mains power so as to charge the vehicles batteries, how would this best be achieved? ie. not having to have the vehicle unlocked with a power cord running to the charger inside of the vehicle (which would obviously be the safest method). You arrive, plug in externally and away the charger goes?

I have also wondered about this, but as questioned by other posters, have been concerned about the safety factor of having an external power point running to a battery charger permanently mounted inside the vehicle. Don't want a smouldering burnt out wreck or worse...

Cheers.
AnswerID: 403660

Follow Up By: Member - Roachie (SA) - Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 21:02

Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 21:02
Rossco, please read my response (above) as I have done a similar thing.

When I first attempted to do this on my previous Patrol ( a wagon style), I simply used an extension cord....I cut off the male plug, pushed the bare end of the cable down through a rubber grommet in the back well, near the tail lights and then I re-connected the male plug. This plug then hung down, but was mostly hidden from view. It was easy to hook up the power at home or a c/van park etc. But I got sick of getting down on my hands and knees to connect the plug, so that's when I decided to add an inlet from a caravan.

On that previous Patrol, I didn't want to bore a 2" hole in the bodywork, so I mounted it on the bullbar and then ran the modified extension cord down from front to back of vehicle, through a length of garden hose, inside the chassis rail. No circuit breaker at that stage!

When I bought my current rig, I did the system the way I outlined above.

As I said, I've probably broken a zillion rules and regulations pertaining the electricians code of ethics/conduct, but it works very well. I'm the only one who delves into the depths of the Patrol, so as far as I'm concerned there is no risk to my family the way I've wired it up. Hopefully these words won't ever come back to haunt me.

Roachie
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Follow Up By: Member - Mark E (VIC) - Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 22:01

Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 22:01
Rossco,

Check out any ambulance or fire engine. These are all wired up in a very similar fashion to that described by Roachie. When we pull up at the branch, the vehicle is plugged in to a 240v, 15 amp outlet, situated on the outside of the body of the vehicle. This outlet is specially designed with a flap over the top to keep water and mud etc out of the pin holes.

This 240v inlet feeds a large battery charger and is wired directly to a couple of 240v outlets inside the vehicle. These are able to run any appliance required: 2 or 3 pin whilst plugged in.

The vehicle also has a fair size inverter and there are separate 240v outlets which can also run any medical equipment required.

I'm no electrician, but I'm fairly certain the system has an RCD to protect the whole system.

It can be done safely, but SHOULD (Roachie???) be installed by a licenced electrician..... :-)

Cheers,

Mark
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FollowupID: 673228

Follow Up By: Rossco td105 - Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 23:45

Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 23:45
Thank you gentlemen, helpful information there (at least for me???).

Cheers.
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FollowupID: 673246

Follow Up By: oldtrack123 - Thursday, Feb 11, 2010 at 11:13

Thursday, Feb 11, 2010 at 11:13
Hi Mark
RE :
""I'm no electrician, but I'm fairly certain the system has an RCD to protect the whole system.

It can be done safely, but SHOULD (Roachie???) be installed by a licenced electrician..... :-)

Quite correct , It can be done safely by some one QUALIFIED who KNOWS the requirements Of the Aust Standards for correct wiring , & location & type of the RCD [a special low current trip RCD in ambulances & patient areas in hospitals]

The point to watch is that you DO NOT interconnect the supply [mains power] in anyway to the inverter output.
Also as stated by you ANY PERMANENT[fixed]240v wiring by law must be done by a certified electrician.
Who should be conversant with the relevant standards
Note also the output of some inverter & gennys may affect the CORRECT operation of standard RCDs
Pushing the test button DOES NOT PROVE correct wiring / functioning of the RCD
It only tests the RCd's mechanism
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FollowupID: 673321

Reply By: vk1dx - Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 21:02

Wednesday, Feb 10, 2010 at 21:02
As others have said this thread is all messed up.

Treading Lightly has to answer Lex's post before anyone can go further.

Phil
AnswerID: 403676

Reply By: Member - Mike DID - Thursday, Feb 11, 2010 at 12:36

Thursday, Feb 11, 2010 at 12:36
"240 Volt inlet on a Cruiser 100
If I was to permanently have an Inverter on board (as well as a Battery Charger) how, where could the inlet socket be mounted out of the weather???? "

- I can only assume that this is what he meant

"240 Volt inlet on a Cruiser 100
If I was to permanently have a POWER SUPPLY (240 IN 12 OUT) on board (as well as a Battery Charger) how, where could the inlet PLUG be mounted out of the weather???? "
AnswerID: 403762

Reply By: _gmd_pps - Thursday, Feb 11, 2010 at 13:47

Thursday, Feb 11, 2010 at 13:47
Just for info and clarification:

240V wiring in vehicles have to comply with AS 3000 and in particular AS 3001
which in essence says that you do not connect earth an neutral, but connect earth to the vehicle only through the cord. You also do NOT use an earth stake.
Vehicle chassis is to be earthed for permanent installation.

An RCD MUST be fitted. They are generally detecting low residual currents so I would not know why a poster her argues that vehicles need a special one. RCDs are meant to trip on low currents. He may refer to RCBOs because in vehicles you probably have lower overload protection than in house circuits.

RCDs are NOT overload protectors. One needs to have additional circuit breakers or use RCBOs, which combine both functions. Have not seen them in OZ though, but I also did not look for them.

One important thing though and I bet that 99% of installations do not have this:
In vehiclesyou need 2 circuit breakers (overload) one before the RCD and one or more after, just as in a permanent situation. I do not recall if the Standard requires that (someone else might know) but my practise is as follows.

Directly behind the 15Amp power inlet you wire a double pole overload circuitbreaker and after that and RCD. One could use a RCBO here, it would do the same. This will serve two purposes: First it will protect your cable (the breaker at the power point of the CP may not, and secondly it will make sure that if something happens on the input side with the wiring (loose contact, wire break etc) that both poles get disconnected. RCDs do not work with the neutral disconnected and the other wire live.

After the RCD you can put circuit breakers for your consumer circuits.
I have a 5Amp Circuit for my Charger and a 5 Amp Circuit for general use.
I deliberately use lower rated breakers in the truck. The camper has higher rated circuits for other devices, but also only 10Amp. I'd rather have more separate circuits than one 16 or 20Amp one, where the plug is rated only to 15amp anyway.

In ALL installations I have seen people rely on the circuit breaker at the supply point and have no double pole switch for the input - Not a good idea.

If one uses this practise it is easy to wire a transfer switch from/to an inverter to achieve automatic switching between internal and external 240V.

I am not an electrician if you may wonder so take this NOT as advise. I just
use my common sense.

And also: use flexible cable rated for the current you require, which has the proper insulation for outdoor use. Stiff (solid) cable may break eventually in a vehicle.

have fun
gmd
AnswerID: 403768

Follow Up By: Gronk - Thursday, Feb 11, 2010 at 14:06

Thursday, Feb 11, 2010 at 14:06
Sorry mate, but most houses have combined rcd/circuit breakers in them.....been out for 20yrs !!
In fact, I haven't seen one that had seperate breakers....
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FollowupID: 673347

Follow Up By: _gmd_pps - Thursday, Feb 11, 2010 at 19:40

Thursday, Feb 11, 2010 at 19:40
So you are saying the houses do not have main fuses before the RCD ??
Well I would not want you to do any electrical work on my place.
20 years is no excuse.. sorry. even if it may be practise
have fun
gmd
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FollowupID: 673390

Follow Up By: Lex M (Brisbane) - Thursday, Feb 11, 2010 at 19:58

Thursday, Feb 11, 2010 at 19:58
"So you are saying the houses do not have main fuses before the RCD ?? "

Course they do. On the pole. My 30+ year old house has the RC device before the breakers. It has one RC device covering 2 power circuits.
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FollowupID: 673397

Follow Up By: _gmd_pps - Thursday, Feb 11, 2010 at 20:17

Thursday, Feb 11, 2010 at 20:17
Lex,

I own several houses and units in different states. ALL of them have breakers before the meter and NOT on the "pole" unless you call this the meterbox.
After the meter you usually have connections to subboards one being the house and other buildings on the property (shed, stables, studio etc.). In the box of the sub board of the house you usually have another main breaker (3 phase in some cases) and after that you have one or more RCDs. It is common practise in Australia to wire 3 phase as such that one phase is used for power points and one for lights. Originally no RCD was required then when the RCDs where introduced (very late here) they were installed after the main switch before the individual breakers. these are RCDs and not RCOBs as stated above because in general the main fuse was already there and only the RCD was added.
So in general there is a main fuse/ breaker then an RCD and then the individual circuits.
Good practise is to have breakers for the sub boards in the main meter box to be able to switch off the connection to a sub board without disconnecting main power. One property I purchased and currently live on had 2 sub boards with no switch in the main box. I had this changed first thing. Common practise or even standards do not always make sure that you get a good solution.

have fun
gmd
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FollowupID: 673404

Follow Up By: Lex M (Brisbane) - Thursday, Feb 11, 2010 at 20:56

Thursday, Feb 11, 2010 at 20:56
gmd how about some consistency here.

in one post
"So you are saying the houses do not have main fuses before the RCD ?? "

next post
"ALL of them have breakers before the meter and NOT on the "pole" unless you call this the meterbox. "

next post
" when the RCDs where introduced (very late here) they were installed after the main switch before the individual breakers"

My switchboard has a main SWITCH before the meter. Not a fuse. Not an overload device.


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FollowupID: 673419

Follow Up By: oldtrack123 - Thursday, Feb 11, 2010 at 22:11

Thursday, Feb 11, 2010 at 22:11
Hi Gmd

Re many of your statements This one says it all:
"I am not an electrician if you may wonder so take this NOT as advise. I just
use my common sense. "


Sorry
Unfortunately "common sense" is only one's personal opinion of their advise.

A few points:-
RCDs have different trip ratings,
30ma standard [for houses etc]
20 ma for patient areas in hospitals, old age homes ,ambulamnces etc

Vehicle permanent installation?
if permanently wired , by fixed wiring but not cord!!!
Earth stake , NO, not if the vehicle is fed from a house switch board or van park outlet.
But yes IF it is directly fed from a metered point [ similar to house] then may be classed as permanent & requires ALL the requirements of AS 3000

Fuses ,OlCBs before meters ??
Not sure which states you are referring to,But to my knowledge all states do not have consumer fuses or OLCBS BEFORE meters.

In Fact ,to my knowledge, NO supply authority would approve of Unsealed fuses /olcbs or main switch before their meters!!!

Flexible cable size must as a minimum be rated the same as the inlet socket, but depending on length may need to be larger,

The inlet socket must be suitable for the expected load based on calculated max demand [with a rule in Standards specifying how to calculate]


I think you should take care in posting detailed advise on how to carry out detailed wireing of 240v.
Some of your info is correct & other is incorrect.

.If some one follows thru on your incorrect advise & an accident occurred they *& the supplier of that advise could be in serious trouble
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Follow Up By: Member - Allan B (QLD) - Thursday, Feb 11, 2010 at 22:50

Thursday, Feb 11, 2010 at 22:50
Oldtrack makes a good point that I myself have been itching to express..........

Oldtrack said: "If some one follows thru on your incorrect advise & an accident occurred they & the supplier of that advise could be in serious trouble"

There is so much expression on this forum about 240 volt electrical matters, some by qualified persons but much by obviously unqualified persons. And even if the advice was correct it may well be misinterpreted or misapplied.

240 VOLTS CAN AND HAS KILLED PEOPLE.

We should not be discussing the detail of how to arrange or install 240 volt installations. This should be the province only of licensed electrical contractors. As Oldtrack has pointed out, the supplier of such advice could be in serious trouble if an accident occurred. Likewise, the providers of this website could well be in an invidious situation if an accident occurred.

So for Pete's sake, stop giving specific electrical advice, even if you are qualified. Leave it to a licensed electrician. I'm sure Oldtrack and the other qualified persons would agree with me on this.

Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: oldtrack123 - Friday, Feb 12, 2010 at 15:04

Friday, Feb 12, 2010 at 15:04
Hi Allan
Thanks for that back up.
Yes you are correct about the possibility of claims against the forum operator.
It is this reason that some forums have posted a sticky warning they are not responsible for any actions as a result of incorrect info.

Unfortunately some posters get very upset when one attempts to correct mis information or potentialy dangerous info.
Some will claim the reason for not giving detailed info on 240v is to maintain a closed shop.
My reason is THAT info can easily be misunderstood resulting possibly in some ones death
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Reply By: Treading Lightly - Thursday, Feb 11, 2010 at 18:48

Thursday, Feb 11, 2010 at 18:48
Well I am back. Sorry for confusion all I would like to do, and have it done legally is to have provision to either iin my garage or at a powered camp site have the ability to INPUT 240 volts to charge my batteries. I do not wont to have leads running into open windows or being crushed in doors.

The question, although simple, could have been asked another way to make a bit more sense, however.

So again I ask the QUESTION can it be done LEGALLY by an ELECTRICIAN, YES or NO?"

Regards

JD
AnswerID: 403787

Follow Up By: Member - Allan B (QLD) - Thursday, Feb 11, 2010 at 18:54

Thursday, Feb 11, 2010 at 18:54
Yes JD, it can. But get it done by a licensed electrician and ignore all the unqualified advice on here.

After all, your Profile motto says it all....... "Life is too good to be dead"

Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: oldtrack123 - Thursday, Feb 11, 2010 at 22:18

Thursday, Feb 11, 2010 at 22:18
Hi JD

Yes it can be done
Your vehicle will be classed as a mobile home & will rquire to be wired in accordance with AS/NZS\3000 with EXTRA requirements as per AS/NZS 3001:2008
Just make sure the electrician [ must be done by a licensed lecty] knows about AS/NZS 3001:2008
Unfortunately some may not
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Follow Up By: oldtrack123 - Thursday, Feb 11, 2010 at 22:24

Thursday, Feb 11, 2010 at 22:24
Hi Jd
Should add he should give you a compliance certificate.
Depending on state it may be mandatory for insurance / rego purposes.
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Follow Up By: Treading Lightly - Friday, Feb 12, 2010 at 06:48

Friday, Feb 12, 2010 at 06:48
Thanks all of you for the good advice, as I stated before, I was simply asking the question, Could it be done?


It was not that difficult, was it?

JD
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Follow Up By: fisho64 - Friday, Feb 12, 2010 at 10:59

Friday, Feb 12, 2010 at 10:59
This thread certainly wasnt "treading lightly"!! :-)
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Reply By: Maîneÿ . . .- Friday, Feb 12, 2010 at 11:20

Friday, Feb 12, 2010 at 11:20
JD, the inverter should be wired as stated in the instructions supplied with it, an electricion should not be required as it's self contained, the only wiring connections that will make it work are 12v and not 240v.

In my opinion, it can be a DIY thing as you just connect the *input cables* direct to your DC battery system.

However, the inverter *output* is 240 VOLT and WILL KILL you !!

Image Could Not Be Found

Image Could Not Be FoundMaîneÿ . . .
AnswerID: 403896

Follow Up By: oldtrack123 - Friday, Feb 12, 2010 at 15:10

Friday, Feb 12, 2010 at 15:10
Hi Mainy
I think you have misunderstood the question
The question is: "do I get a 240v SUPPLY into vehicle"
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Follow Up By: Maîneÿ . . .- Friday, Feb 12, 2010 at 16:02

Friday, Feb 12, 2010 at 16:02
with the perception of hindsight, yes I have to agree, as most if not all posters have made the same mistake and answered the question as asked, which is situated above the reply box you type the reply into.

" If I was to permanently have an Inverter on board (as well as a Battery Charger) how, where could the inlet socket be mounted out of the weather ???? "

So I, as with many, if not most other posters, wrongly assumed it was about an *inverter* installation, because that's the only sentence with the 'question marks' (???)

Maîneÿ . . .
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