Radiatos

Submitted: Saturday, Feb 20, 2010 at 13:39
ThreadID: 76176 Views:2965 Replies:8 FollowUps:7
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Can you please give the pros and cons for and against aluminium and copper radiators
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Reply By: Battery Value Pty Ltd - Saturday, Feb 20, 2010 at 13:56

Saturday, Feb 20, 2010 at 13:56
What I've noticed back in Europe where there is lots of salt spray in winter, the old copper radiators got eaten away in record time, while aluminium is more durable.

Then, there are dissimilar metals copper/alloy cylinder head/iron block - electrolytic action?
Copper is also heavier and way more expensive than aluminium.

Best regards, Peter
AnswerID: 405037

Reply By: Member - Roachie (SA) - Saturday, Feb 20, 2010 at 14:05

Saturday, Feb 20, 2010 at 14:05
From what I've read over the years:

Aluminium Pro's: lighter and dissipates heat more efficiently. Con's: not as easy to perform bush repairs on.

Copper Pro's: easy to solder and undertake an emergency fix in the bush. Con's: don't dissipate heat quite as efficiently.

Roachie
AnswerID: 405040

Reply By: OzTroopy - Saturday, Feb 20, 2010 at 14:12

Saturday, Feb 20, 2010 at 14:12
Not that I have had a real issue with either type due to a personal preference for 5yr replacement intervals .....

On this forum ... the main consideration should be repairability .... Anybody with an oxyset can generally patch up a copper/brass radiator ... but those aluminium with plastic tank jobbies are normally a throw away item outside of the city.

Aluminium can/will also fatigue badly with vibration ... So even a full aluminium radiator ( no plastic tanks ) needs to be considered carefully, depending on regular use road surface types.

Just my thoughts.
AnswerID: 405042

Reply By: Rockape - Saturday, Feb 20, 2010 at 17:11

Saturday, Feb 20, 2010 at 17:11
Ray,
most of your questions have been answered, especially the repair ability of copper versus aluminium.

Our old cruisers at work don't have problems with the aluminium radiators, they eventually block off with mud and rot out.

The cruiser I use underground is now 4 years old and still has the original radiator.

I run an aluminiun radiator in my cruiser and find it does get rid of the heat well.

One problem with them, if they are overheated the plastic top will split some time in the future.

AnswerID: 405053

Reply By: howesy - Saturday, Feb 20, 2010 at 17:30

Saturday, Feb 20, 2010 at 17:30
Another thing with the aluminium. If your earth system is not good and you get power leakage into the cooling system then an aluminium one corrodes quicker under these conditions than a copper. Otherwise the other draw backs such as plastic tanks repairability etc but their thermal properties are better.
AnswerID: 405060

Reply By: snapper49 - Saturday, Feb 20, 2010 at 18:59

Saturday, Feb 20, 2010 at 18:59
I have a fully alloy (PWR)
Never get one with plastic tanks-get a full alloy and that means alloy tanks and if it has a resevoir an alloy resevoir as well

I use distilled water in it with added coolant

As said before get your electrical system checked for any earth leakage

AnswerID: 405071

Reply By: Member - Allan B (QLD) - Saturday, Feb 20, 2010 at 19:23

Saturday, Feb 20, 2010 at 19:23
Howesy,
Snapper,

Could you expand or tell us more about this "earth leakage" stuff?

What does it do?
Where does it leak from?
How do you prevent it?

Cheers
Allan

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 405074

Follow Up By: OzTroopy - Saturday, Feb 20, 2010 at 19:34

Saturday, Feb 20, 2010 at 19:34
Theres a few posts on EO about in various vehicles .....

Some general info here --->
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FollowupID: 674790

Follow Up By: OzTroopy - Saturday, Feb 20, 2010 at 19:35

Saturday, Feb 20, 2010 at 19:35
bahhhhhh .... lol


http://www.tectaloy.com/page12.html


In the "green" book
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FollowupID: 674791

Follow Up By: howesy - Saturday, Feb 20, 2010 at 19:48

Saturday, Feb 20, 2010 at 19:48
We often call it "earth leakage" but its actually stray currents that facilitate electrolytic corrosion in the cooling system. It is usally caused by earthing problems which is why we all mistakenly call it earth leakage. Unchecked it can cause extreme premature failure of aluminium radiators. Some manufacturers wont even honour the warranty unless you have had the system checked for stray current by an auto elec. so read the warranty well. It is not all that common but common enough to check and its done in 30 seconds.

Here is a helpful link maybe.

http://www.erareplicas.com/427man/cooling/electolysis/index.htm
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FollowupID: 674792

Follow Up By: howesy - Saturday, Feb 20, 2010 at 21:22

Saturday, Feb 20, 2010 at 21:22
Here is a testing procedure, note you need analogue meter.

Check procedure
1. Remove the radiator cap and run the engine to operating temperature. Do not rev the engine as this may cause the coolant to aerate. Note: Removing the cap will reduce the boiling point of the coolant. This may result in electric cooling fans not operating on some vehicles,

2. Switch ON all electrical items including Items such as a mobile phone, rear demister, driving lights, etc.

3. Switch an analogue multi-meter to a scale of 5 volts DC or less. Ideally the meter should be capable of reading millivolts. Do not use a digital multi-meter as its internal operating characteristics are not suitable for this test.

4. Place the negative lead of the multi-meter on the battery negative post.

5. Dip the positive lead into the coolant without touching the filler neck or the core of the radiator.




Multi-meter check procedure for stray currents



6. A reading of more than .05 volts indicates the presence of a potentially damaging stray current passing through the coolant. Ideally the voltage should be 0 volts, however it is highly possible that some voltage level will be detected.

7. If no voltage or a very low voltage is detected, carry out the same test as in point 4, but with the ignition OFF.

8. If voltage is detected, isolate the circuit by turning all electrical items OFF and switching each circuit ON individually.


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FollowupID: 674804

Follow Up By: Rockape - Sunday, Feb 21, 2010 at 07:31

Sunday, Feb 21, 2010 at 07:31
Howesy,
just a question, I see you say to bring the engine to operating temp, does this mean the coolant becomes more conductive with heat or is it another reason.

Have a good one
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FollowupID: 674844

Follow Up By: howesy - Sunday, Feb 21, 2010 at 18:42

Sunday, Feb 21, 2010 at 18:42
I am presuming that is the reason that is the set testing procedure I was given so I would follow it. Suppose they wouldnt have put it in the procedure if it couldnt make a difference in some vehicles.
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FollowupID: 674943

Follow Up By: Rockape - Monday, Feb 22, 2010 at 07:27

Monday, Feb 22, 2010 at 07:27
Thanks for that
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FollowupID: 675003

Reply By: Atta Boy Luther - Saturday, Feb 20, 2010 at 21:03

Saturday, Feb 20, 2010 at 21:03
all you need to know
http://www.are.com.au/feat/techtalk/ALUMRAD.htm
AnswerID: 405092

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