Permits Permits Permits

Submitted: Saturday, Feb 27, 2010 at 00:04
ThreadID: 76374 Views:4101 Replies:7 FollowUps:11
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Gees I am new to the outback travel planning and I am stunned by the number or different permits I have to have. I need a secretory just to arrange the paperwork.
There has got to be an easier of getting all these permits for camping and entry in to different areas. That Desert Parks Pass is hexy do I need that to do the Oodnadatta Track and then up to Yulara and the Rock.
Cheers
Wayne B
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Reply By: Baz&Pud (Tassie) - Saturday, Feb 27, 2010 at 05:41

Saturday, Feb 27, 2010 at 05:41
Hi yu Wayne
From memory when doing the Oodnadatta Track you don't need the Desert Parks Pass, unless you intend to go into Lake Eyre.
Go into Treks and have a look, can get all the info there.
Cheers
Baz
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AnswerID: 406271

Reply By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Saturday, Feb 27, 2010 at 08:25

Saturday, Feb 27, 2010 at 08:25
Hi Wayne
Firstly the places that you have outlined require no permits, with the exception if you want to visit Wabma Kadarbu Mound Springs Conservation Park, which the Desert Parks Pass covers. If you thought that you were having problems with the easy places, just wait until you venture into very remote places, that is when the fun starts when applying for permits, that is if you get them granted. My remote trips are planned well over 12 months in advance and I usually start applying for the various permits at least 6 months before heading off. If you are coming in from NSW, make sure you drop into the Flinders on the way up to Marree before starting the Oodnadatta Track


Cheers

Stephen
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Reply By: DIO - Saturday, Feb 27, 2010 at 09:59

Saturday, Feb 27, 2010 at 09:59
Nothing new about Permits. You should already be familiar with them if: you go fishing (in some States), own a dog, drive and or own a car,caravan, trailer, drive or own a boat (powered), park your car at a meter or ticketed area, drop rubbish off at the council depot (some areas), ride a bus, tram, ferry or train, go to the movies, own a firearm, go hunting (some areas), travel on a toll-way, enter a national park, go to the zoo, swim in the public pool (baths), if you area Primary Producer, a Horticulturalist, bee keeper, live stock carrier, etc there are literally hundreds of different types of permits (some call them fees, tickets etc) yet they are all related to the provision of access or use of. Having a permit system for access to land owned by the 'traditional owners' is nothing new. It provides controlling bodies with the means to know who is travelling in/through their lands, over what periond, how many vehicles/people etc. Nothing different to the permit issued when you enter a National Park for the day, a week or whatever. Enjoy your trip.
AnswerID: 406293

Follow Up By: OzTroopy - Saturday, Feb 27, 2010 at 10:50

Saturday, Feb 27, 2010 at 10:50
Enjoy your trip ... pffttttttt

Its like being on one of those el cheapo bus tours ...

Be here by a certain date,
Be gone by a certain date,
Be there by a certain date,
Be gone by a certain date,

It may be a "trip" .... but its certainly no Holiday.
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Follow Up By: pop2jocem - Saturday, Feb 27, 2010 at 17:54

Saturday, Feb 27, 2010 at 17:54
Dio, I think all the "services" you list do come at a cost and the requirement to obtain a permit, license, ticket whatever is in place but how many of these take up to 12 months to obtain and are granted or not in a lot of cases by a body with little connection to the area you are seeking permission to visit. I have no objection to asking someones permission to visit an area that they own, and from what I have seen and been told most times that permission is granted. I think the objection most people have is the time frame and the convoluted process involved.

Cheers Pop
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Follow Up By: 2000 Red Rodeo - Saturday, Feb 27, 2010 at 20:35

Saturday, Feb 27, 2010 at 20:35
Now that's what I call a free country........ LOL

I don't mind permits for outback travel as long as the money gets to where it is needed.
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Reply By: Alloy c/t - Saturday, Feb 27, 2010 at 14:34

Saturday, Feb 27, 2010 at 14:34
It will only get worse [Kakadu reintroducing permits] while we as a nation continue to allow reverse discrimination.
AnswerID: 406335

Reply By: Motherhen - Saturday, Feb 27, 2010 at 17:08

Saturday, Feb 27, 2010 at 17:08
Wayne, the 'simple' through transit permits for roads such as the Great Central Road can be applied for on line, and received by return email within 24 hours. They can be done by fax when you get nearer as time frames are often unknown.

For example, we planned to go from Uluru through to WA. The permit for the NT section could be done on line but i did it from the CLC office in Alice Springs. The maximum they allowed was for one or two days travel within a specified three week period. We still didn't get there so went back and did another application for the next three weeks. However the WA side allowed a much shorter time frame for flexibility, so i picked up the application forms from the Ngaanyatjarraku office in Alice Springs and when at Yulara, got them to fax (cost me about $1) the application form during week day office hours, and the permit was faxed back within 24 hours.

If you click on the hyperlinks words 'permits' in your post, there is plenty of advice on how to apply here on ExplorOz.

Motherhen
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AnswerID: 406353

Reply By: _gmd_pps - Saturday, Feb 27, 2010 at 20:43

Saturday, Feb 27, 2010 at 20:43
It is a total joke here in Australia.
I travelled all over the US (49 states) and also all over Europe
and guess what ? no permits required to go anywhere...

I just do not accept any of this permit business, which creates
income which is turned into more booze for some.

have fun
gmd
AnswerID: 406388

Follow Up By: Member - Wayne B (NSW) - Saturday, Feb 27, 2010 at 21:18

Saturday, Feb 27, 2010 at 21:18
Thanks everyone for your comments.
I do agree with GMD though it is a joke.
Anyway I will only need a few this time for the loop from Kings Canyon The Plenty Highway is ok so is the OD track is ok.
I most likely with need something for The Rock but that should be simple enough.
I am going to join a good 4 wheel Drive Club Here in Newcastle, one that dose long outback trips, That way the Permit thing should be easier to understand.
Thanks again
Wayne B
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Follow Up By: Tonyfish#58 - Sunday, Feb 28, 2010 at 14:38

Sunday, Feb 28, 2010 at 14:38
Its not a joke and easy enough to do - They have the right to issue permits, its there land - Should be thankful you can still drive across these lands - keep complaining and maybe one day they will close it down.

Most of these permits do not cost anything but your time, just a little effort and its all done.

As stated above there are a lot of permits in society today - why complain about these permits? Maybe its just another way to be racist without admitting it - gmd has added that rasist innuendo
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Follow Up By: Alloy c/t - Sunday, Feb 28, 2010 at 15:30

Sunday, Feb 28, 2010 at 15:30
tonyfish#58 . is it racist to deny access to a section of Australia due to ones colour ? And if not of that colour you require a permit ! Oh yes that is racism and discrimination .
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Follow Up By: OzTroopy - Sunday, Feb 28, 2010 at 18:56

Sunday, Feb 28, 2010 at 18:56
Thats the go Tony .....

Im all for closing them down ...

Then all the public funds spent providing/maintaining "private" roads ... could be spent on bypasses around the perimeters that we dont need permits for.

And anybody who especially wants to go look around on a "private property" ... can go and knock on a front door and ask permission .... same as happens at my place.
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Follow Up By: Tonyfish#58 - Sunday, Feb 28, 2010 at 19:18

Sunday, Feb 28, 2010 at 19:18
Alloy - Your the one putting colour/race to permits - If you are not a member of the community that owns the land you need a permit white black brindle or aboriginal.

OzTroopy - Bit overboard mate :-) Remember there are a lot of public roads passing through many a private property and it would be ludicrous to think that every land owner should pay for the maintenance. Some of the roads up there could be maintained by user pays - the others are main through routs which we as taxpayers are quite happy to fund - if it requires a permit to drive it why not? No skin off my nose.

Cheers
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Reply By: The Rambler( W.A.) - Saturday, Feb 27, 2010 at 23:17

Saturday, Feb 27, 2010 at 23:17
I think gmd has said it all. Having travelled with permits before (which all cost money) I have NEVER been asked to see one and have travelled without them on other occasions without a problem. I certainly will not be supporting the system if it is not necessary----only my opinion.The money can not be justified.
Bush camp

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Follow Up By: Crackles - Sunday, Feb 28, 2010 at 13:58

Sunday, Feb 28, 2010 at 13:58
We've found many central Oz permits are in fact free. Our last permit up the Mt Davies rd was a work of art in it'self yet cost nothing. The permit is often not used as a fund raising excercise but to set out where you can & can't go, pass on warnings or even supply some facilities like water & toliets. Not unreasonable & even for the small amount you do pay for some, does not really cost that much in the scale of things.
Cheers Craig.................
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Follow Up By: Bob of KAOS - Sunday, Feb 28, 2010 at 14:43

Sunday, Feb 28, 2010 at 14:43
Craig

How long ago did you do the Mt Davies Rd?

We are going there in April and I'd be interested in any recent information you might have. I was last there in 2001.

Bob
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Follow Up By: Crackles - Sunday, Feb 28, 2010 at 18:45

Sunday, Feb 28, 2010 at 18:45
Gaday Bob. We were there last September. Track obviously is overgrown in many places requiring detours. Sand was well packed & although the track dissapeared in places it was both easy to get over the dunes & navigate with just the 250K Nat Map. On the damage front there was only 1 flat tyre for the convoy but a ton of scratches.
Trust you have your permit & local guide organized as that took our group over 6 months & even then we had last minute date changes. Certainly one of the harder places to get pemission for.
Cheers Craig................
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