Troopy drivers position

Submitted: Tuesday, Oct 07, 2003 at 18:37
ThreadID: 7666 Views:1603 Replies:6 FollowUps:10
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As I am in the market for a newer 4by I drove a diesel Troopy yesterday. It was a '91 model. I found that although there was ample space for my 190cm frame there was nowhere to rest my left foot whilst driving. I could not put my foot at the side of the clutch not could I put it under the clutch.The way the seat is positioned I would be very uncomfortable over a long drive.

Has anyone else had this experience?
Is there a remedy ie move or raise the clutch pedal?

The other thing about the Troopy is the big fella overhang at the rear. If I had to buy such a vehicle I am sure that the rear bumper would soon be torn off through the gullies I traverse.

Any comments?

Cheers

Willie

Cheers
WillieNever a dull moment
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Reply By: haze - Tuesday, Oct 07, 2003 at 19:19

Tuesday, Oct 07, 2003 at 19:19
Willie, as mentioned to you previously ime quite a shortarse but getting my size 8 beside the clutch pedal is an impossibility. Happily for me, am quite comfortable with left leg curled back, but could understand your problem. I looked at the pedal just now and reckon it could be offset then stiffened. It wouldnt hurt to be shorter also as the pedal effort is quite light. As to the overhang, dont think the troopy is any longer than trayback and it takes a pretty good dropoff to hook the towbar (which I did raise from std.) Have a look at the springs, even the latest 78 soon sag. I installed polybags which transform the whole rig.
cheers haze
AnswerID: 33025

Follow Up By: Willie - Tuesday, Oct 07, 2003 at 19:57

Tuesday, Oct 07, 2003 at 19:57
Thanks haze for the feedback. I thought that that is what I would have to do with the pedal. Thanks also for the Polyair tips.
My G60 has excellent ground clearance and next to nothing overhang but I still managed to drag the towhitch which is 40cm off groundlevel through some of the gullies. If I get a Troopy I could always weld skid bars on to the rear end.
Cheers
WillieNever a dull moment
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FollowupID: 23601

Reply By: Member - Ken - Tuesday, Oct 07, 2003 at 20:12

Tuesday, Oct 07, 2003 at 20:12
Willie

I have a 1997 75 series troopy .

I am 6' 2" ( about 185) and yes the floor well, clutch pedal thing is a fair bastard.

It is due to the narrow body in conjunction with a large drive train tunnel.

In reality and structual wise, there is sweet F/A you can do about it.

However there is a couple of things you can do to ease the pain.

(1) Sit in it again and you will notice that you sit slightly to the left (middle of the vehicle) off centre to the floor well (not the steering wheel) resulting you being unable to place your left leg straight out.

I have had Aerotech seats put in and the drivers one fitted as close as possible to the drivers door. It is off centre to the steering wheel, however it stops my left leg from being 'turned in' by the drive train tunnel.

(2) The other thing that Aerotech did on installation, was to put 10mm packers under the front mounts which gives an egonomic lift under the drivers thighs and tends to take the stress out of where am I going to put my left leg.

Now as to your foot, nothing to help here other than lift it up and place it on top of the tunnel for awhile.

I have been up around the Flinders Nth/Sth, Innaminka, Birdsville, Simpson etc etc and find that I get used to it after a day or two. ( I don't use it for every day use)

Also I am right on the max weight for this vehicle plus a 'tad' and have resorted to Kings Mining Pack springs and polyair bags. Yep! a $ or three in that lot, however I have never ever had an exit/entry problem with over hang and the stability overall is just magic. I tested the overhang thing out Arkaroola by going across country from the coper smelter to that back road and valley that leads to somebodys hut. Starts with a G from memory. Now there were some savage gullies, washouts etc along the way which were crossed without the 'overhang' touching.

Once again all 4WD vehicles have had sacrifices made somewhere in their design that tend to give you the S...s. Some bad, some infuriating and some frustrating, but it all boils down to what ever 'floats your boat' in the end, and what you are willing to put up with to get the outcome desired.

Just as an aside I would be more concerned about the condition of the bearing shells in that vehicle you looked at.

Hope this helps

Ken Robinson
AnswerID: 33037

Follow Up By: Willie - Tuesday, Oct 07, 2003 at 20:28

Tuesday, Oct 07, 2003 at 20:28
Thanks for your detailed feedback, Ken. Much appreciated.
The vehicle in question was my mates' who stopped by last night en route home to the Alice. I am hoping to buy one around the 95/96 mark if I go that way.
I do not really want to get rid of my old truck but I need powersteering to ease the arthritis pain in my wrists and shoulder, lots of space to convert the vehicle to my bush camping set-up and diesel to take me out once again into the western deserts and beyond. I have a friend who has had lots of experience with Troopys and he will give the vehicle a once over when I have brought the beast to my stable. Have to wait another 6 months however due to budgetry constraints(sounds a bit like the Treasurer?) before I make a purchase.
I am also considering a GQ Nissan, as it would be more comfortable,but I would have to do too much to raise the vehicle and fit long range tanks. Much to ponder.
Cheers
WillieNever a dull moment
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FollowupID: 23608

Follow Up By: kezza - Tuesday, Oct 07, 2003 at 21:12

Tuesday, Oct 07, 2003 at 21:12
willie
If you end up with a GQ ideal economical lift for it is to use the 21mm GU trayback OME coil springs they give a good 4-5" lift are very comfy dont sag and will only set you back about $600 all round if you find the right outlet. Finding the right length shockie may cost a bit more but use the $$s you save on the GQ to fund it all.

The Landcruiser rear end overhang is a bit of a drag ('scuse the pun) my brother has an 80 series without a lift and wont come bush bashing anymore bacause always scrapes on the gullies and rocks even though he has a rear spare tyre carrier still knocks the trailer wiring and the rear bumper. Gotta be lifted to be serious.
kes
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FollowupID: 23614

Follow Up By: Willie - Tuesday, Oct 07, 2003 at 22:45

Tuesday, Oct 07, 2003 at 22:45
Kerry,
Thanks for the advice. I am making a long list of all the pros and cons.
Cheers
WillieNever a dull moment
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FollowupID: 23627

Follow Up By: Voxson (Adelaide) - Wednesday, Oct 08, 2003 at 08:10

Wednesday, Oct 08, 2003 at 08:10
After owning both of the vehicles you mention above and with your physical challenges i would definately be a GQ pilot.... They are a cinch to raise..(takes about 3hrs to do yourself and a few beers).. The front is the 2hr part because of tighter fit (spring compressors neeeded)...
The GQ is like a Statesman Deville compared to the Troopy.....But i am telling you things you already know...

Regards..._____________________________________________

_____________________________________________
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FollowupID: 23641

Follow Up By: Willie - Wednesday, Oct 08, 2003 at 17:40

Wednesday, Oct 08, 2003 at 17:40
Thanks Voxson. When the time comes I will no doubt make the final decision. Have not driven or even sat in a GQ for some time now. How is the drivers position including the space to rest your left foot set up? Will be in Port Pirie and Port Augusta tomorrow and will go an look if I can find a GQ to sit in.
Cheers
WillieNever a dull moment
0
FollowupID: 23691

Reply By: Member - Bob - Tuesday, Oct 07, 2003 at 20:53

Tuesday, Oct 07, 2003 at 20:53
Willem,
Ummm 190 cm. Perhaps you could have a few shims removed from those new fangled knees. Or better still, get a car with a bit more creature comforts. I bet you end up with the GQ. Why raise it? It'll go anywhere in bog standard format.Bob
AnswerID: 33044

Follow Up By: Willie - Tuesday, Oct 07, 2003 at 21:05

Tuesday, Oct 07, 2003 at 21:05
Robert,

Will you take the shims out? Or is that not your field? :-) I will remind the specialist of your advice when he does the other knee.

Your bet may be right though I don't know. I dread the thought of starting all over again trying to build a sleeper in the rear of a pretty car and making it multi-functional.

Willie

Never a dull moment
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FollowupID: 23612

Reply By: John - Tuesday, Oct 07, 2003 at 21:12

Tuesday, Oct 07, 2003 at 21:12
Hi Willie
I have had a 97/75 series a 2000/78 series and have just got a 2003/78 series, I am also 200 cm or 6 feet 6 inches tall.

In the two 78 series I have had they now have an inbuilt foot rest for the left foot.
I guess they have alterd the drivers positions a little as well to suit.

I found that I can strech out in the 78's without to much hassle and have done a few very long trips in them without to much hassle.

I have found that there are not very many vehicles of any model/type that adequately cater for those of us with long legs. We are the Japanese minority.

Try and have a sit in a 78 and see if it make s much difference.

Regards
John
AnswerID: 33047

Follow Up By: Willie - Tuesday, Oct 07, 2003 at 22:01

Tuesday, Oct 07, 2003 at 22:01
Hi Jihn,
Thanks for that. The 78 series however, is going to be out of my reach. So if I go the 75 way I will have to look at some pedal modifications.
Cheers,
WillieNever a dull moment
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FollowupID: 23618

Reply By: Brett - Tuesday, Oct 07, 2003 at 22:03

Tuesday, Oct 07, 2003 at 22:03
Mr W

I am 192cm and have a 89 troopy and further more I have a size 16 shoe...you think you have problems!

I got hold or a very firm cushion and stuck it under the seatcover which increased the amount or leg movement due to my bum being further away from the floor.

good ruck.

AnswerID: 33060

Follow Up By: Willie - Tuesday, Oct 07, 2003 at 22:42

Tuesday, Oct 07, 2003 at 22:42
Thanks for the advice, mate

Willie
Never a dull moment
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FollowupID: 23626

Reply By: Warpig - Tuesday, Oct 14, 2003 at 17:24

Tuesday, Oct 14, 2003 at 17:24
I find you get used to the floor space after a while. We average 800 km / day during bitumen stages, and don't have too much trouble. There's plenty of room to move around, which helps, as does propping your le on the tunnel now and again.

We drag the rear end all the time, with a 2" lift. It has never stopped us, though: we just drag it on through. We don't do 'u' turns!. I quite like having a towbar there to run along the ground and protect the softer (and more expensive...) bumper bar etc.
AnswerID: 33760

Follow Up By: Willie - Tuesday, Oct 14, 2003 at 19:21

Tuesday, Oct 14, 2003 at 19:21
Thanks for your feedback. I was dragging my towbar on my old truck last time I went bush and it has virtually zero overhang. I will have alter the clutch pedal if I buy a Troopy as I need so sit comfortably whilst driving. I won't compromise!

Cheers

Willie
Never a dull moment
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FollowupID: 24257

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