Changing Split Rims

Hi all,

I have a new V8 troopy on order. As you know they come with Split Rims.

Does anyone know the correct (and easiest) procedure for changing the tyre?

What tools etc? How to remove the Split Rim?

Cheers Paul
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Reply By: Hairy (NT) - Thursday, Apr 08, 2010 at 11:28

Thursday, Apr 08, 2010 at 11:28
Two good tyre levers ( Dowidat or something similar) a bead breaker and into it.
Just give it ago, you will work it out pretty quick.
AnswerID: 412101

Reply By: get outmore - Thursday, Apr 08, 2010 at 11:46

Thursday, Apr 08, 2010 at 11:46
its not quite as simple as that
- not saying its hard but you really need to have seen it at least once (how long do you reckon it would take someone to work out that the tiny notches in the ring show where the hooking hole is?) and theres some saftety precautions which should be taken when re inflating

I could try and describe it but is there no one you know that can show you?
AnswerID: 412103

Reply By: Member - bungarra (WA) - Thursday, Apr 08, 2010 at 11:47

Thursday, Apr 08, 2010 at 11:47
Quite straight forward as Hairy has said but be aware they can be dangerous if you are complacent when pressuring them back up.........

give the split rim some good solid taps with a hammer to ensure they are seated before putting air in them............some more taps whilst pressuring up to ensure they are seated.......whilst pressuring them make sure you do so with them upright and you on the opposite side to the split to ensure if they pop the missile will be heading away from you not decapitating you

dont be daunted they are an excellent rim for the right purpose...check this site out

www.safetyline.wa.gov.au/pagebin/mechhazd0040.pdf
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Follow Up By: Member - bungarra (WA) - Thursday, Apr 08, 2010 at 11:54

Thursday, Apr 08, 2010 at 11:54
http://www.4wdonline.com/Wheels/Split.html

another picture site for you
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Reply By: splits - Thursday, Apr 08, 2010 at 16:39

Thursday, Apr 08, 2010 at 16:39
Paul
There is some more information in the link below although it will probably take you half the night to read it. You should find it very useful though along with the rest of the tyre information on the same site.

Your tyre leavers must be designed for split rims. There are different types for one piece rims.

The little slot shown in bungarra'a link is the key to getting the ring off. After breaking the bead, you stand a tyre lever up vertically in the gap and push it down to expose the slot. You then put the point of your other lever into it and, with a little more levering and maybe a few light taps with a hammer, you will soon have the ring off.

The ring is very easy to replace by starting one end by hand then taping it on right around with a hammer. I use a good quality rubber one but a steel one will do providing you are not too heavy handed.

These rims require a bit of regular maintenance. It is not a bad idea to remove the tyre at least annually to keep the ring and rim rust free and clean and the bead easy to break. They are designed to enable tyres to be removed easily by hand but that may not be the case if they are not looked after and the tyre is left undisturbed for years.

Keep the tyre and tube very clean during assembly. You don't even want as much as a single grain of sand inside because it could work its way through the tube and cause a slow leak. I always wipe both with a damp rag then keep them off the ground.

Use the correct type of tyre lubricant and plenty of chalk inside during assembly.

Don't be frightened about inflating them., They are designed to be safe and they are providing they are not heavily rusted or damaged and the steel in the tyre bead is ok. When you look at the photos of a split rim on Beadell's site, you will see why a ring in good condition can't possibly come off when the tyre is properly seated and sitting on top of it.
.
If you are not accustomed to doing tyre off the rim repairs then down load the Rema Tip Top catalogue and check out their range of patches, stem plugs, combi plugs, adhesives etc. You will not believe what is available.

http://www.beadelltours.com.au/rim_debate.html
AnswerID: 412137

Reply By: Voxson - Thursday, Apr 08, 2010 at 16:49

Thursday, Apr 08, 2010 at 16:49
2 tyre levers.
The original lever in the Toyota tool kit will be able to pick the split ring out.

There are a few tricks.
Remember to break the beads before you start picking the ring out.

Make sure you end up with the split about 10 degrees opposite the wheel weld when you are assembling for maximum strength.

Make up some sort of chock to put under the wheel which keeps the bottom of the tyre off the ground or seating the ring will be a harder task when assembling.

The ring can be seated back by just standing on it.

You really need to see it being done or the first time will be a nightmare.

Make sure the ring is seated well and pointing toward nothing of value when pumping up.

I run 65 psi in my splits.
30 on dirt.
16 on sand.






AnswerID: 412139

Follow Up By: get outmore - Thursday, Apr 08, 2010 at 17:50

Thursday, Apr 08, 2010 at 17:50
"You really need to see it being done or the first time will be a nightmare"

agreed - its not hard but theres so many easy ways to go about it its really best seen.

Ive seen people struggling getting the ring off until i showed them after youve plucked the end of the ring out with the slot all you need to is prise that end up far enoug to put the other lever under the ring and into the centre hole. all you do then is kick it around easy peasy

not easy to describe though

however unless your fitting them with tyres like this


4-6 ply nylon sidewalls you would be just as well to ditch them for some 1 peice rims and good radial tyres

running radials on split rims isnt the most ideal setup as it gives you all the disadvantages and none of the advantages
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FollowupID: 682115

Reply By: equinox - Thursday, Apr 08, 2010 at 20:17

Thursday, Apr 08, 2010 at 20:17
Here's how I did it in 1997.

Sorry about poor quality..



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AnswerID: 412166

Reply By: Mills5 - Thursday, Apr 08, 2010 at 20:33

Thursday, Apr 08, 2010 at 20:33
Even if you have a lot of experience as a tyre fitter , changing them in the bush is not as simple as doing it in a tyre shop , or even as easy as the man at the show who tries to sell you his 'demon' weapon ..

Get down to your local tyre shop and ask them to give you a lesson , using your own rims, and even help you get the necessary tools, not all split rims are the same !! Bit like the Castrol ad !!.. some tyre levers work better on some rims than on others !!!

But don't listen to me ..I only spent years in atyre shop and change mine out in the bush too ...but only when i really have to !!

Dont forget the compressor !!..and a deflator ..and a spare tube or two ...make sure they are top quality ..teh list goes on !!
AnswerID: 412170

Reply By: exploreaus - Saturday, Apr 10, 2010 at 05:54

Saturday, Apr 10, 2010 at 05:54
I would like to thank everyone who responded to my query - what a great result - I appreciate it very much!

cheers Paul
AnswerID: 412322

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