Camping books?

Submitted: Monday, Apr 19, 2010 at 10:38
ThreadID: 77833 Views:3162 Replies:5 FollowUps:4
This Thread has been Archived

Related Pages

I'm wanting a miracle book that tells me everything to do with camping and campsites in state and national parks as well as caravan parks.

I'm dreaming I know.

We are travelling for 6 months around WA and NT (and some SA) and would love a book that we can pick up and find camp sites in.

We will have the net but even on that I find that it isn't all consolidated in one place. You have to visit the NP site and then just random google for other places to camp.

So are there state park books etc? I know there is NP books but we are after EVERY place you can camp.
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Member -Signman - Monday, Apr 19, 2010 at 11:04

Monday, Apr 19, 2010 at 11:04
We use the 'Boiling Billy Publications' campsite book- along with the CMCA 'Wanderers Mate' book


AnswerID: 413532

Reply By: Tenpounder (SA) - Monday, Apr 19, 2010 at 11:14

Monday, Apr 19, 2010 at 11:14
Well then, you had better start writing!!! Camps 5 is generally regarded as one of the best. But I have also benefited from the Boiling Billy series of publications, and I suspect from your outline that they (one for each State) would be worth a go in your case. Then, when you have spent all your money on these books, you can start saving all over again so that you can afford to go camping before you are too old!!
On our travels, we've found that Camps Australia wide (we've got the fourth edition) and Boiling Billy do NOT cover the same territory, with Camps Australia wide tending to focus a bit more on travellers needs, and Boiling Billy targeting camping as such.
We also use Ron and Viv Moon's book Discover Australia: National Parks (Random House) though ours is the 1998 edition. This has heaps of info on National Parks (maps, walks, campsites, flora and fauna etc.). Being a national book, it is a big lump to cart around.
Hope this helps you.
AnswerID: 413533

Reply By: missy - Monday, Apr 19, 2010 at 11:45

Monday, Apr 19, 2010 at 11:45
Okay.
Off to google these two books.
Also found the "Priceless Campsites & Rest Areas" review on the exploroz articles section. It founds perfect for us. Anyone used it?
AnswerID: 413536

Follow Up By: Motherhen - Monday, Apr 19, 2010 at 15:59

Monday, Apr 19, 2010 at 15:59
You can't do better than Jan Holland's Priceless series for NT and WA Missy. More places and more detail than Camps Australia Wide 5, also lots of useful tourism advice in a more practical first hand way than the travel brochures and websites. A quick search here will show where i have said this all before as have others. They are a few years old, but very little has changed. With any publication, you may go to a listed camp and find it has been signed closed to camping. In WA and NT there is lots of scope for bush camping and we generally find our own, but use designated camp grounds near to the parks and walks for convenience and to do walks early and late to avoid the heat.

We used Camps 5 for the other states, but missed Jan's tourism info. We only bring out Camps 5 when we can't find anything all on our own.

Motherhen
Motherhen

Red desert dreaming

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 683643

Reply By: Motherhen - Monday, Apr 19, 2010 at 16:04

Monday, Apr 19, 2010 at 16:04
Hi Missy

The thread above this has a National Parks book on special at the moment.

Mh
Motherhen

Red desert dreaming

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 413552

Reply By: Brian Purdue - Monday, Apr 19, 2010 at 16:38

Monday, Apr 19, 2010 at 16:38
Missy you do not say what you are camping with. A big caravan? a mobile home? a camper trailer? a tent?. Who is "we"? you and the hubby/boyfriend? Children?
I spent three years driving around WA and only stayed in caravan parks when I could not stand the smell of myself and my clothes but for the rest of the time I "bush camped". I started looking for a place to stop around mid-afternoon and at about an hour before dark virtually just pulled off the road if I could not find a spot that appealed to me. Down side roads, in truck bays off the main highways, you will soon find 100s of places to camp.
If you are in the bush and you see a nice spot near a windmill keep far enough away to allow stock and or wildlife to come to water. You will be surprised what you see.
I am now 77 years old and in poor health or I would still be doing it. I travelled alone with a 4wd and a camper trailer and should have started when I was 65!!
Have fun
Brian
AnswerID: 413556

Follow Up By: Brian Purdue - Monday, Apr 19, 2010 at 16:50

Monday, Apr 19, 2010 at 16:50
Addendum:
I forgot. Ask the people who are travelling towards you. Many of them have fiound spots that are really well worthwhile. Also if you find a remote spot that appeals to you and there is already someone there ask if they mind you camping near them. I have had a couple of knockbacks but usually they are doing the same thing and will share experiences with you.
0
FollowupID: 683645

Follow Up By: missy - Monday, Apr 19, 2010 at 17:47

Monday, Apr 19, 2010 at 17:47
Sorry some more info would help.

Hubby and I and the 3 young ones are tenting it. The kids are 2, 4 and 6. We have a freedom tent. (The largest tourer you can get).

Sounds like the NT, WA books talked about above are the go.

Thanks for your advice
0
FollowupID: 683656

Follow Up By: Brian Purdue - Monday, Apr 19, 2010 at 20:48

Monday, Apr 19, 2010 at 20:48
Whilst I do not want to "hog" the whole post, I never, in three years, got north of Marble Bar nor east of Bulong. I think I missed more than half of what there is to see.
With three littlies I think more than 5 hours a day travelling will be too much for them.
Have fun
Brian
0
FollowupID: 683685

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (14)