Tyre recommendations for a 4x4 trayback with heavy slideon camper

Submitted: Wednesday, May 05, 2010 at 21:56
ThreadID: 78248 Views:3443 Replies:4 FollowUps:4
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We are heading off through central australia to W A and I have at present BFG A/T's are there any other tyres with higher weight carrying capabilities able to cope with the rigours of such tracks worth considering?
Alex
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Reply By: Mick O - Wednesday, May 05, 2010 at 22:14

Wednesday, May 05, 2010 at 22:14
Alex,

try the Toyo Open Country MT. Amazing sidewall strength and a heavy load rating to boot. I have just fitted to 285/75-16's to the new Toyota. I saw them in action in the Great Sandy last year and they performed admirably. Price is between $405 and $490 so shop around.

Cheers Mick
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trip would doubtless be attended with much hardship.''
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Follow Up By: prado4x4 - Thursday, May 06, 2010 at 10:00

Thursday, May 06, 2010 at 10:00
I can agree with you there Mick.

I've got a 79 series trayback with an alloy canopy, rooftop tent, camper, etc so it's on the heavy side - especially over the rear axle. Like you I've also got 285/75R16 Toyo Open Country MT's.

It's interesting to hear you're comments on the vehicle that had them in the Great Sandy. I was up for a new set of tyres, and couldn't get the BFG MT's I'd been using previously (it was in the time when BFG was going from the KM to the KM2 muddies, and supply was poor - plus I'd always been very wary of the thin sidewalls on the BFG's in dry/stake prone country).

After looking at the alternatives, I decided on the Toyo's as a replacement set after seeing how well they did on a 4WD Race Vehicle that I supported in the Australasian Safari out here in WA (7 days of Offroad Racing through some fairly tough country - tyre/stake wise). Price wise, they weren't much more expensive than the competition after doing some shopping around.

In comparison to the BFG MT's I had on previously, they are a much stronger tyre - especially the sidewalls, and seem to be holding up / chipping less also.

John
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Reply By: REV'S - Wednesday, May 05, 2010 at 22:46

Wednesday, May 05, 2010 at 22:46
Hi Alex
We have a Wombat Slideon mounted on a 70 series tray back, we can recommend both the Cooper SST mud or ST A/T tyres and are readily available. We have no probs and have done the Simpson, Vic High-country and getting ready to do Cape York in June. HOw long have you had your Wombat? and what number is yours ? ours is no46. unable to send photo as only a visitor on this site. If interested contact Steve at Wombat and get our ph no
Regards Allan & Mary Anne
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Reply By: racinrob - Thursday, May 06, 2010 at 16:19

Thursday, May 06, 2010 at 16:19
I have a 75 series 'Cruiser and carry a Compass slide on, all up weight is 3.750 tonnes and at present am running Cooper S/Ts 265/75 R16 and they appear to be doing a good job after having big problems with earlier Coopers. These are replacement tyres after the first TWO SETS failed miserably at around 20,000 kms, the distributors supplied them a very reduced price.

Rob.
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Follow Up By: KyleF250 - Friday, May 07, 2010 at 21:07

Friday, May 07, 2010 at 21:07
yeah cooper/mickey thompson/dick cepek got a habit of pulling lugs out and flow cracking
goodyear silent armour pick of tyres for me on the f-truck
tyre pressures need to be adjusted to suit road conditions
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Follow Up By: KyleF250 - Friday, May 07, 2010 at 21:07

Friday, May 07, 2010 at 21:07
yeah cooper/mickey thompson/dick cepek got a habit of pulling lugs out and flow cracking
goodyear silent armour pick of tyres for me on the f-truck
tyre pressures need to be adjusted to suit road conditions
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FollowupID: 685857

Follow Up By: Member - Bucky - Friday, May 28, 2010 at 05:31

Friday, May 28, 2010 at 05:31
Kylef250

As far as I know, those tyres you talked about, all come out of the one factory, these days.


I suppose it don't really matter, as long as you get LT construction, that's the key, but I hear thoseTojo boys talking about the Open Country tyres too.

Me ?......I prefer my B F Goodrich, AT's in a LT construction.

I punished mine last yaer, big time, but the integrity of the tyre remains good. There are a lot of cuts and chips on them,, but just look at where we went, and the pressures we were running, and you will get them too.


Cheers
Bucky

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FollowupID: 688582

Reply By: Robin Miller - Friday, May 28, 2010 at 07:50

Friday, May 28, 2010 at 07:50
These isn't much that competes with them Alex - all tyres like BFG AT have compromizes so you must pick the one with the least compromize for your circumstances.

Your type of rig has a high C of G and its central to have good grip on gravel so serated pattern with more than 50% rubber over the tread area is central hence you can't even consider anything with big blocks which causes the tyre to roll across gravel, and also to much tread surface gives gravel particles no where to slot into.

For long distances on gravel roads the BFG type pattern offers significantly more grip and don't slide as much which is why they win tyre shootout's in this type of country, the 80psi min rating of say my new ones is also a bonus.

General grabber make a knock off pattern which isn't bad if trying to save every dollar but not for me as $300 for 265/75 AT's I considered acceptable.





Robin Miller

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