The idiots that make Oil filters

Submitted: Wednesday, May 12, 2010 at 15:04
ThreadID: 78419 Views:3931 Replies:18 FollowUps:9
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Why can't the idiots that make oil filters put a hex nut on the end so we can at least get them off easier.

I know the makers put the filters in dumb areas, but hell it's only a hex nut molded in to fix all the problems.

Don't know how many oil filter romovers I have that just don't work if the filter is tight. They either slip, can't get access to tight an area, handle gets in the way of mounts or A/C pipes and can't get tight before it's useless, need two hands to operate but can't get two hands on to it due area.

Sorry just got skun hands knuckels and arms from trying to get a filter of a Pajero that's way to tight.
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Reply By: Member - Matt M (ACT) - Wednesday, May 12, 2010 at 15:12

Wednesday, May 12, 2010 at 15:12
I know where you are coming from. I usually end up getting frustrated and shoving a phillips head screwdriver right through the thing to loosen it.

Not pretty, but.......
AnswerID: 416404

Reply By: ChipPunk - Wednesday, May 12, 2010 at 15:15

Wednesday, May 12, 2010 at 15:15
Because that would require a sturdier housing.
And then people would complain about the nut size if it wasn't 19mm LOL.

Have you tries and end-on removers? I wrap a belt around a bar and twist.
AnswerID: 416405

Reply By: fugwurgin - Wednesday, May 12, 2010 at 15:33

Wednesday, May 12, 2010 at 15:33
i agree aswell!!!
the best thing about my nissan GU 3.0l motor was the oil filter was a cartridge inside a housing. the housing could be undone by puting the square end of a ratchet in and undoing it. bloody top idea.
AnswerID: 416406

Reply By: Mikee5 (Logan QLD) - Wednesday, May 12, 2010 at 15:35

Wednesday, May 12, 2010 at 15:35
How much tighter would it have been if the idiots put a hex nut on the end to do it up with LOL
AnswerID: 416407

Reply By: wicket - Wednesday, May 12, 2010 at 15:48

Wednesday, May 12, 2010 at 15:48
get yourself a nylon strap oil filter remover, never fails to remove filter.....about $20 from repco
AnswerID: 416409

Reply By: Member - Andrew (QLD) - Wednesday, May 12, 2010 at 15:48

Wednesday, May 12, 2010 at 15:48
I hear ya :) Spent the weekend changing the oil, and doing some maintenance on the DiD Pajero. First time i had used my gear to do the job only to find the oil filter huge! Had to purchase another tool which does a terrible job at the angle needed to access the filter....gggrrrrr.

Andrew
AnswerID: 416410

Reply By: jeep cherokee - Wednesday, May 12, 2010 at 16:14

Wednesday, May 12, 2010 at 16:14
I have to agree with Wicket.The Nylon strap remover is attached to a 1/2 inch connecter and the socket ratchet makes it easy to remove most oil filters.My old diesel Jeep had the oil filter tucked well up in the bowels of the motor and this piece of equipment was the only one that worked.
AnswerID: 416413

Reply By: get outmore - Wednesday, May 12, 2010 at 16:19

Wednesday, May 12, 2010 at 16:19
hahah

Ill let you off if you didnt service the vehicle last time yourself

otherwise whose the idiot?

you put them on and take them off by hand - never used a filter remover on a filter I fitted myself
AnswerID: 416414

Follow Up By: Member - Christopher P (NSW) - Friday, May 14, 2010 at 01:17

Friday, May 14, 2010 at 01:17
same, i use my hand which has and put plenty of oil on the ring before i put the filter on.

Little trick lube oil ring well????? with fresh clean oil.....
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FollowupID: 686745

Reply By: Olsen's 4WD Tours and Training - Wednesday, May 12, 2010 at 17:41

Wednesday, May 12, 2010 at 17:41
Because people would over-tighten them more than they do now. Mine go on by hand and come off by hand- though sometimes a bit of force is needed, I only need my hands.
AnswerID: 416424

Reply By: Fred G NSW - Wednesday, May 12, 2010 at 18:10

Wednesday, May 12, 2010 at 18:10
We're hearing ya brother :-((

Unless ya drive a pre 1970 holden or falcon, ya can't reach nothing any more, LOL, but then some of these young blokes would want to know where the rest of the flamin' donk was ? hahahahahaha :-)))



AnswerID: 416427

Reply By: Member - mazcan - Wednesday, May 12, 2010 at 18:29

Wednesday, May 12, 2010 at 18:29
hi
if they are put on in the correct manner no nut or spanner is needed

and if a nut was built into the cannister blokes would do them up that tight they would squease the oring or seal to the point it would bugger up or leak

and the cost of a filter would double if a nut was built into it

imho
me thinks it's the nuts that fit a filter too tight is the real nut issue

not having a go at anyone in particular just my thoughts on something that re-occurs each time an oil change comes around
cheers
AnswerID: 416429

Reply By: Member - Greg A (QLD) - Wednesday, May 12, 2010 at 19:11

Wednesday, May 12, 2010 at 19:11
It's not necessarily a problem with the way the filter has been put on. My Toyota Starlet that I use to commute has the filter in a position that only allows one hand access. I'm able to get it as tight as required when installing the filter using one hand, but getting it off with one hand (that sounds rude!) is nearly impossible.

I made up my own removal tool using some 25mm strap screwed to a bit of 25X25mm pine.
AnswerID: 416435

Reply By: _gmd_pps - Wednesday, May 12, 2010 at 19:40

Wednesday, May 12, 2010 at 19:40
why do you all think so complicated ?? who needs a strap for a filter ??
just a screw driver will do, ram it through the housing and off ya go ..
never had any trouble that way if it really was too tight from some
idiot mechanic who has no idea about pressure fittings.
have fun
gmd
AnswerID: 416446

Reply By: Wilko - Wednesday, May 12, 2010 at 19:50

Wednesday, May 12, 2010 at 19:50
Hi rough as guts,

I agree but I think the overiding problem is the lack of room around motors these days. I had a loose bolt on my Pajero and I could access it, I had to take it to the dealer.

Give me the old 70's motors which had about a foot clearance all round lol.

Cheers Wilko
AnswerID: 416448

Follow Up By: Fred G NSW - Wednesday, May 12, 2010 at 20:17

Wednesday, May 12, 2010 at 20:17
Wilko, you and I are on a similar wavelength LOL LOL

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FollowupID: 686569

Follow Up By: cycadcenter - Thursday, May 13, 2010 at 07:07

Thursday, May 13, 2010 at 07:07
Remember when you could stand in the engine bay with two feet firmly planted on the ground.

If you had fuel pumping to the carby and spark you could generally get yourself home or to help.

Bruce
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FollowupID: 686611

Reply By: fisho64 - Wednesday, May 12, 2010 at 20:57

Wednesday, May 12, 2010 at 20:57
if its that big a deal go to Supercheap or Repco etc and get a remote filter housing setup.
Probably around $100 and something bucks and you can bolt it to the roof if you want!
AnswerID: 416467

Reply By: Member - Serendipity(WA) - Thursday, May 13, 2010 at 05:53

Thursday, May 13, 2010 at 05:53
After years of working oil filters by hand the latest tool from toyota to suit their new V8 engines is a hex head oil filter remover.

Toyota have made an oil filter that goes inside the sump housing and this tool removes the great big plug so you can get at the oil filter. You would think other companies could make up a similar tool for external oil filters. Maybe they do.

And the oil filter is located next to the drain plug so you don't have oil coming out in two locations and end up with oil all over the driveway. Plus it is very easy to access being just under the passenger footwell area.

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AnswerID: 416496

Follow Up By: Olsen's 4WD Tours and Training - Thursday, May 13, 2010 at 06:36

Thursday, May 13, 2010 at 06:36
Got to love?? these new engines. Oil filters in the sump and starter motors under the inlet manifold. Give me the old 1HZ and Nissan TD42. I'll ven happily pay a tax for not meeting Euro4 or 5, just give me the simplicity back.
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FollowupID: 686610

Follow Up By: Member - Serendipity(WA) - Thursday, May 13, 2010 at 08:24

Thursday, May 13, 2010 at 08:24
Ah yes

My grandfather would say similar things when they brought out these damn fangle things called automobiles. Not like a reliable horse that could find its own way home after a heavy night on the town.

Not sure the filter is in the sump but just the area - form the pic you can see what looks like the oil pump is probably just there too.

But I do agree that manufacturers could look to simplicity a bit more - if this thing ever broke down out in the bush I would be totally stuffed to get it running again. Unlike earlier not computerised ones - their break downs where usually simpler to start with.

David

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FollowupID: 686615

Follow Up By: pdm3006 - Friday, May 14, 2010 at 21:46

Friday, May 14, 2010 at 21:46
Other companies have made that tool.
I religiously use Baldwin oil filters (full flow and bypass) and I bought one of these types of tools that fits the filters perfectly for (from memory) $6 from the Baldwin head office in Melbourne.
They will even send it to you if you don't live in Melbourne.
Really helpful and knowledgeable people too.
Cheers.
Peter.
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FollowupID: 686835

Reply By: Ray - Thursday, May 13, 2010 at 09:16

Thursday, May 13, 2010 at 09:16
Oil filters used to have hexagon nuts on the end but don't ask me when they were removed.
Talking about complexities of vehicles these days, a chap in our village has a Mitsubishi Magna V6 and to change the rear three spark plugs he had to remove ,I believe, the inlet manifold. I believe that the vehicle manufacturers do not want the average joe to do maintenance of their own.
Perhaps we should ask some of these so called salesmen, or is that sexist, how do I ect?
One thing that struck me was with my son's car. The fuel pump cacked it. The pump was inside the fuel tank and the tank, which was 3/4 full had to be drained and the tank removed from the car to fix it.Fortunately he was close by and I was able to tow him into my workshop.
In another instance I had a F150 with duel fuel tanks that had a fancy gismo to change tanks. I don't think that this gismo worked from day one, so I installed an external fuel pump and simply transferred fuel from the rear tank to the front when required.
I also had an instance where the fuel pump on a Holden that had the old red motor cacked it but I was able to get home by syphoning fuel from a jerry can on the roof. You couldn't do that with the new vehicles. As far as room in the engine bay (what room) forget it and unless you have a pit or a hoist some jobs are very hard to do.
AnswerID: 416506

Follow Up By: get outmore - Thursday, May 13, 2010 at 10:48

Thursday, May 13, 2010 at 10:48
cmon now were stretching it

those holden 6s were a serioly unreliable pos and if you wernt a bush mechanic
you soon learnt to be

my dad got stranded 2wice by ours 1st was when the cardboard timing gear disintegrated and second was when the og for the dizzymade of the same stuff fell apart

no bush mechanicwill fix those shortcomings.

then there was the matter of them needing a rebuild about every 150k
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FollowupID: 686633

Follow Up By: Wherehegon - Thursday, May 13, 2010 at 21:03

Thursday, May 13, 2010 at 21:03
Mitsi do have a special tool for removing the rear plugs, most replace them with the platinum tipped ones on the back only so they last the 100 thou before they need replacing them again, the front they just use normal ones. Could never work that out, why not just replace all 6 with them and you wouldnt have to worry about changing any of the plugs for 100 thou ?? Regards Steve
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Reply By: Member - Johny boy (NSW) - Thursday, May 13, 2010 at 12:08

Thursday, May 13, 2010 at 12:08
We use nothing but Holden 202 engines to power our farm trucks and if it dont have one in it from factory we soon make sure it does as they are VERY reliable and EASY to work on imho and as for oil filters as mentioned before you put it on by hand and you take it off by hand ,the last time I bought a filter for my cruiser I was offerd a filter with anut on it but I cant remember the name of it and while we are on the subject I met a bloke about 4 weeks ago with an old patrol that has a removable housing that he then throws away a toilet roll and installes a new one,he said he has done it with his trucks for years and never had a problem and as long as he carries oil with him he wont get stuck as he always has a roll of dunny paper with him LOL! ??
has anyone else seen these as I want to buy one for my cruiser as a back up plan??

Cheers all :)
AnswerID: 416518

Follow Up By: Member - Neil G (VIC) - Thursday, May 13, 2010 at 13:50

Thursday, May 13, 2010 at 13:50
Hi Johny boy,
I had one of those filters on my old 1980 XD Falcon and she had 406 000 on it with absolutely no trouble when it was retired. They area by-pass filter called a Franz Filter and you should be able to find them with a search on the net.
Cheers,
Neil
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FollowupID: 686655

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