Overland Trail Tas

Submitted: Wednesday, May 26, 2010 at 21:51
ThreadID: 78801 Views:3634 Replies:18 FollowUps:38
This Thread has been Archived
My daughter is planning to hike the overland trail in mid winter!!!

She is well into planning and has roped in a friend... both in their mid 20s... fit and capable... but very inexperienced?

How worried should I be?
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Indigo Jones (QLD) - Wednesday, May 26, 2010 at 21:54

Wednesday, May 26, 2010 at 21:54
Worried enough to buy them an EPIRB and PLB ? wouldn't be surprised if they see a brass monkey looking for a brazing rod that time of year mate.
AnswerID: 418306

Follow Up By: Member - Royce- Wednesday, May 26, 2010 at 22:03

Wednesday, May 26, 2010 at 22:03
Epirb organized.
0
FollowupID: 688339

Follow Up By: MrBitchi (QLD) - Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 07:38

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 07:38
Epirb is not much good if no-one can get in to rescue you. The weather can shut that place down in a heartbeat..
0
FollowupID: 688394

Reply By: Member - KC (TAS) - Wednesday, May 26, 2010 at 21:58

Wednesday, May 26, 2010 at 21:58
but very inexperienced? Don't do it....
AnswerID: 418309

Follow Up By: Member - Royce- Wednesday, May 26, 2010 at 22:05

Wednesday, May 26, 2010 at 22:05
Her argument to me is that 'it is well marked' and 'there are a couple of groups following a day or so behind her'....

She is determined to go it alone if her friend doesn't come, so I've offered to come along and die with her....
0
FollowupID: 688341

Reply By: Rhys - Wednesday, May 26, 2010 at 22:25

Wednesday, May 26, 2010 at 22:25
If she doesn't have multiday walk experience in winter conditions she should not attempt this walk. It can be a very dangerous environment in winter, even properly prepared and experienced, Rhys.
AnswerID: 418321

Follow Up By: Member - Royce- Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 09:23

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 09:23
Sadly she is now adult and now makes her own decisions... still I worry!
0
FollowupID: 688417

Reply By: Member - Michael John T (VIC) - Wednesday, May 26, 2010 at 23:03

Wednesday, May 26, 2010 at 23:03
Royce,

We used to take groups of year 12 students through in late june early july. They had weeks of preparation and instruction beforehand and with very competent leaders who had walked it many times. (I think I did it 5 times) Nevertheless it was never the same from one trip to another and conditions can be great one day and autrocious the next and I mean full blown blizzards. Its a very beautiful but dangerous environment for the inexperienced.

Tell your daughter to do the trip but not in winter and with a small group of experienced walkers preferably with one or two who have walked the track previously.

The other point to make is that at this time of the year many of the highlights are unatainable eg climbing Mt Osser and Barns Bluff etc.. better and more responsible to do it when the weather is a little more predictable.

Regards,
.
Mike (Vic)
We retired to travell
It's time to go again...

Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 418326

Follow Up By: Member - Michael John T (VIC) - Wednesday, May 26, 2010 at 23:06

Wednesday, May 26, 2010 at 23:06
Meant also to comment, it would be seriously unwise to do it alone. Relying on other following groups to get you out of trouble is unfair to them as they may have their problems to cope with.

Mike.
We retired to travell
It's time to go again...

Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 688367

Follow Up By: Member - Royce- Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 11:03

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 11:03
"Tell your daughter to do the trip but not in winte"

Do you have a daughter? I used to be in a position to tell her not to do things. Nowadays it takes a little more tact and leverage to achieve my outcomes.

I won't stop trying though!
0
FollowupID: 688447

Follow Up By: Member - Michael John T (VIC) - Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 20:50

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 20:50
I understand what you are saying Royce ... yes I have two quite independant grown up daughters.

Mike. (Vic)
We retired to travell
It's time to go again...

Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 688555

Reply By: Kim and Damn Dog - Wednesday, May 26, 2010 at 23:14

Wednesday, May 26, 2010 at 23:14
Gidday Royce

I‘m a bit disturbed about this. If it’s the walk I’m thinking of, it’s not to be taken lightly, particularly in winter. In fact I’m surprised the walking track is even open at that time of the year.

I’ve done a lot of trekking through that country particularly the Western Arthurs, and I can tell you it’s not a place you want to be without any experience in winter.

If I remember rightly there are a number of huts built along the Overland Track, but that wouldn’t reduce the difficulty in getting to them.

Unless your daughter is very fit and experienced in that sort of country I’d suggest she does it in the summer months first.

PS I have no augments with carrying an EBIRB, but it could be a number of days before a helicopter or a ground crew arrives in that country due to the winter conditions.

Regards

Kim
AnswerID: 418330

Follow Up By: landed eagle - Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 07:04

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 07:04
I agree with you Kim. Being born and bred Taswegian we often hear of tourists going on walks in Tassie's beautiful wilderness only to get caught out by the rapid change of weather conditions over here, unfortunately leading to severe injury,exposure or death. This can happen easily in summer, let alone winter. The overland track isn't something I've tackled, but a few of my friends who are very experienced Tassie walkers have many times, and they always go during fair weather months.
The rescue choppers can't fly through low cloud and fog and it doesn't take long to freeze to death up there.
A young foreign tourist was caught out on cradle mountain a couple of years ago and slipped and injured himself. He couldn't get back to his pack and he was discovered a few weeks after his unfortunate demise when the snow melted enough to uncover his backpack and then his body.
0
FollowupID: 688393

Follow Up By: Member - Royce- Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 11:00

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 11:00
So as she approaches her late 20s... I can't tell her not to do something... but I can suggest alternatives...

any come to mind??
0
FollowupID: 688444

Follow Up By: Member - John and Val - Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 11:25

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 11:25
Royce,

Yes its difficult with "adult" offspring who still can make childish decisions - and yes we do still worry.

I suggest that your daughter should be old enough to understand that placing herself in a situation where others may have to risk life and limb to rescue her is totally irresponsible. She should not have to be coaxed or cajoled out of that kind of decision making process. If she cannot understand that then unfortunately she still deserves to be treated like a child!!!

The alternatives are to build up fitness and experience on the many walks that are available so that when she is actually ready she will be able to do this walk at the appropriate time of the year. The OT will still be there - she does not have to walk it this winter just because she thinks its a good idea right now. Growing up is about delaying gratification until circumstances are favourable.

Other walks - Hume and Hovell (NSW), Great Ocean road track (Vic) Bibulmun (WA) Heysen Trail (SA) to name a few.

Just my thoughts - as mother of 3 grown men

Val.
J and V
"Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted."
- Albert Einstein

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 688459

Follow Up By: Member - Royce- Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 11:53

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 11:53
Good advice and thoughts Val.

I'll keep working on this.

My grown son actually worries me even more as he goes about his daily occupation, perched on steep crumbling hillsides in his excavator, downing dangerous trees in fire effected areas around here!

I guess it's a Dad's job to worry.
0
FollowupID: 688464

Reply By: Tenpounder (SA) - Wednesday, May 26, 2010 at 23:53

Wednesday, May 26, 2010 at 23:53
Just to add a point or two.
One of the issues in a winter Overland is to decide how much gear to take: if you prepare for bad weather, you'll end up carrying a fair load, but if you don't, then you can become a Hypothermia candidate very quickly. Sadly, you can actually increase the risk of hypothermia by trying to carry enough gear to survive a blizzard, and slowing yourself down. Yes, I am speaking from personal experience.
The notion of doing the overland solo in winter isn't courageous, it is insane.
I recall one of our mob, who was well over 6ft, deciding to walk between the botton grass clumps instead of jumping from clump to clump, and he suddenly fell into a hole that left him immersed in freezing water up to his armpits. Mind you, jumping from clump to clump with a heavy pack on isn't much fun either! It is in these conditions that company is vital.
There's a heap written about these issues, especially the insidious way hypothermia creeps up on the victim, without enough conscious warning.
Not a good idea!
AnswerID: 418339

Follow Up By: Member - Royce- Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 11:01

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 11:01
An impressive amount of gear has been amassed. She might stick in into a pack soon and find out how heavy. Hopefully before she gets on to the ferry!
0
FollowupID: 688445

Reply By: jdwynn (Adelaide) - Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 06:18

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 06:18
Royce
Official website (link) says "Bookings are required for each walking season (1 November to 30 April)." Not real clear, but I wonder if that means you're not allowed to do the walk outside of that period. Best wishes

AnswerID: 418348

Follow Up By: Member - Royce- Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 09:25

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 09:25
That's why [I'm told by she who knows] there are so many people walking in the colder months. You don't need to book....
0
FollowupID: 688418

Follow Up By: MrBitchi (QLD) - Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 10:25

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 10:25
Royce, I'd suggest that comment from she who knows is enough to tell you she shouldn't do it. One of the reasons they insist on booking is to know who is out there and their schedules. Very hard to mount a rescue expedition when you don't know anyones out there.

Good luck.
0
FollowupID: 688437

Follow Up By: Member - Royce- Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 11:05

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 11:05
They still have to sign in before they leave. Sadly she has done a lot of research and has had a heap of advice.

Again ... sadly.... she mixes with the outdoor edventure types who have told her to 'go for it'. You know how it is... when you want to do something, you look for the supporting advice.
0
FollowupID: 688448

Reply By: Member - Heather G (NSW) - Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 07:13

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 07:13
H Royce,
It is a beautiful trek in the summer months.
We walked this in January a few years ago, with guides, and it was a clearly marked track then but in winter with deep snow on the ground there would be little chance of knowing where you were. You would have to carry so much gear to keep warm at night, (as well as the food of course) it would be nearly impossible I reckon to do it.
I clearly remember the first hut we got to for lunch had 2 levels and a door on each as at any time of the year there can be snow and the only way out of the hut is through the top level door!!!
In winter, it would be madness for anyone who isnt extremely familiar with the area and track to attempt it. Others have died in the vicinity. I know we think we are invincible when we are young, but I think it is irresponsible of them.
Just my opinion of course.

Cheers,
Heather
Of all the paths you take in life, make sure a few of them are dirt. John Muir

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 418351

Follow Up By: Member - Royce- Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 11:07

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 11:07
A couple of days ago she showed me some pics of the two level hut/s.

She was ever so excited by the concept! Sigh!
0
FollowupID: 688450

Reply By: MrBitchi (QLD) - Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 07:37

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 07:37
I come from Tassie. That track catches out many very experienced hickers. The only way she should do it is with a group that has experienced guides, regardless of the time of year. Winter, on your own, is asking for trouble.
AnswerID: 418355

Follow Up By: Member - Royce- Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 11:09

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 11:09
Which of course is what it's all about. The challenge.

I'm not going to get much sleep over the next couple of months!
0
FollowupID: 688451

Reply By: Member - Fred - Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 09:19

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 09:19
Why would you bother? You most likely will not see anything of the scenery - friend of mine did the trip in autumn then asked me if he could see my pictures as it was foggy for the whole trip and all he could see was the track and his feet.
AnswerID: 418372

Follow Up By: Member - Royce- Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 09:27

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 09:27
The 'why' is important of course. In my daughter's case it's a failed relationship and the desire to take on a BIG challenge to get over it.

Scarey huh??
0
FollowupID: 688419

Follow Up By: Kanga1 - Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 10:29

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 10:29
Hi Royce, there are Companies doing hiking trips through the Kimberley, Kings Cascades to Bachsten camp is one of them, 20 minutes on google will see her set up with something very challenging without the risk of exposure/hypothermia, and being unrescuable due to weather. Food for thought. Cheers. Kanga.
Tempus Fugit

Kanga.

Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 688439

Follow Up By: Member - Royce- Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 11:11

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 11:11
This time last year she was doing a teaching round in a remote community in Arnhem land.... Travelled there by herself from Eastern Vic. Lived in the community and went bush with them....

I met her up there and we had many an adventure. I'd love to be back there now.

I guess that's the point. She's been there done that and got the T shirt.

Now for something completely different! Groan!
0
FollowupID: 688452

Reply By: Member - Mark (Tamworth NSW) - Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 09:37

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 09:37
As part of a guided walk I have done it in early January. One of our guides walked it in July when he was 16 years old with some mates.

The track I found incredibly well marked (compared to other walks) with many kms of board walks where been bogs or the track was corduroy (spelling?). If you stuck to the track I couldn't see how you could fall into mud holes or bogs now. Off the main track different story.
The huts I found were well appointed and provided you had dry clothes you could survive almost anything, but then I'm not used to bleak cold southern weather

What would concern me is that your daughter is effectively alone ( min. 3 persons, two must be experienced) and the fact that much of the track will be frozen/ covered in ice. The slip factor on the icy ground through the tree rooted/ rocky sections and even boarded steps carrying a 15-22kg pack should be a worry. You can't see the surface is covered in ice, hence slippery.
Surely there are shorter walks she could do which would give the same experience, but offer easier rescue?
AnswerID: 418375

Follow Up By: Member - Michael John T (VIC) - Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 21:02

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 21:02
Mark,

Even though the track is now largely board walks in a deep snow covering (often dumps of several feet within a couple of days)it is very very easy to walk off the side of them and causing injury to yourself.

Mike (vic).
We retired to travell
It's time to go again...

Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 688556

Reply By: Shaker - Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 09:44

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 09:44
This reminds me of all the discussion prior to Jessica Watson's departure, about which I was a soothsayer of doom!

Just give her as much advice & encouragement as you can, maybe even buy her a Spot Messenger.
AnswerID: 418376

Follow Up By: jackablue - Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 10:08

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 10:08
Im pretty sure the difference is in the original post - very inexperienced!
0
FollowupID: 688428

Follow Up By: The Landy - Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 10:22

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 10:22
Spot messenger, GPS, Sat-phones, are all aids that may assist in managing the risks associated with remote area travel.

They are not, and should never be viewed as the entire risk management solution. Royce’s daughter needs to understand the risks associated with this trip, and if she does, she then needs to assess whether they are acceptable given her level of inexperience.

If your risk management plan largely revolves around activating a personal beacon, than you don’t have the experience necessary and you will potentially end up exposing yourself to unacceptable risks.

On Jessica Watson, she had sailing experience, a plan, assessed and understood the risks, and mitigated as many as she could....

As Cecil Madigan said, well planned trips don’t fail.

Cheers, The Landy
0
FollowupID: 688434

Follow Up By: Tenpounder (SA) - Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 10:24

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 10:24
Not a good analogy, Shaker. Jessica was well prepared, experienced in most if not all aspects, and well equipped. Setting off on the Overland without a full pack (tent, stove, dry clothes, etc.) and without the experience and training would be, well, like Jessica setting off in a 10ft rubber ducky with a tin of baked beans. A SPOT may work well, but the response time would likely be too slow to save her in a snow storm.
0
FollowupID: 688435

Follow Up By: Member - Royce- Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 11:14

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 11:14
Now you point it out Chris....

I might just be a GOOD analogy.

She will have a full pack, and she is far from stupid.

Also she has been 'out there' for a decade of life longer than young Jessica.

She won't be alone.

Shaker... I think maybe you are the first positive slant that I've had in this thread.... thanks.

Tell me about spot messenger. [please]
0
FollowupID: 688454

Follow Up By: Shaker - Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 13:19

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 13:19
Jessica Watson had never done any single handed blue water sailing!

The response time for her in an emergency would have possibly been far greater too.

I am quite sure that Royce's daughter will also acquit herself well, with the right encouragement & advice.
0
FollowupID: 688475

Follow Up By: jdwynn (Adelaide) - Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 13:32

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 13:32
Well honestly, I agree with Shaker. We live in a risk averse world (nanny state as Mark Webber said) – the kids, too often sit indoors and definitely avoid risk, life and experiences IMO, and largely we’re all responsible. Even if Jessica W failed it wouldn’t change my mind about things. I don’t think the kids learn about life much because they are so protected. “Experience – the term we give to our mistakes” and all that – but we don’t let them make mistakes. Honestly Royce, at this point, I’d be happy for my kids to join your daughter because to my way of thinking, she’s obviously made of the right stuff – she’ll be an interesting person, she’ll have experience in things, she’ll understand measured risks, she’ll be more knowledgeable about life than the next person. Armed with a PLB and previous experiences I’ll bet she’ll do alright and be better for the experience. Just my 2 cents.
0
FollowupID: 688477

Follow Up By: Member - Royce- Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 13:43

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 13:43
I just this moment had a conversation with her.

She is happy to pull out and exit by one of the escape routes...

But is adamant that now she has set herself to undertake the challenge, pulling out would be worse than attempting and failing it.

0
FollowupID: 688480

Follow Up By: Shaker - Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 16:02

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 16:02
Good on her!
0
FollowupID: 688507

Reply By: The Landy - Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 10:01

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 10:01
I’m all for people pursuing their dreams, especially when it comes to adventure travel. But there is usually risk associated with adventure travel.

They key is to identify the risks, understand them, negate them as much as possible, and have a plan as to what course of action you will take if things do not go to plan, or if you have some sort of emergency.

The question your daughter needs to ask herself (honestly) is do I have the experience necessary to actually identify the risks associated with taking this particular trip? If she believes she hasn’t then don’t go. If she believes she has then she needs to work through all those risks and assess whether they are acceptable taking into account her experience level and having done that, then make a decision as to whether to go or not.

A wing and a prayer won’t cut it on the sort of trip your daughter is planning, especially given unpredictable winter conditions.

Cecil Madigan, on commenting about his trek across the Simpson Desert, said something along the lines that well planned trips don’t usually fail....

I subscribe to that theory, but implicit in that statement is you need to be in a position to be able to know and understand what the risks to failure are.

Good luck either way it goes......

Cheers, The Landy
AnswerID: 418377

Follow Up By: Member - Royce- Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 11:19

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 11:19
Thanks Landy.

She is certainly doing her homework and is not completely stupid.

Does she have the ability to fully assess the risks though....

She has very little experience in snow and long overnight hiking.

She has however travelled the world, and been stuck in the outback with me a few times. She is resourceful and fit.

We even got lost in the Vic High Country once. It took a fair bit of care and planning to walk our way out... luckily before dark.

Now I think about it .... it's probably my fault. I have often headed off on adventures, got into interesting situations and had the thrill of solving the problem with a happy ending.

I am on the verge of asking if I can tag along!


0
FollowupID: 688456

Follow Up By: The Landy - Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 14:40

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 14:40
Hi Royce

“Now I think about it .... it's probably my fault. I have often headed off on adventures, got into interesting situations and had the thrill of solving the problem with a happy ending.

I am on the verge of asking if I can tag along!”

I hear what you are saying, and gaining experience sometimes means putting yourself out there. From some of the other comments you have made it would appear your daughter is well balanced and able to assess whether she should be there or not.....So good luck to her.

I remember when I first went flying solo when I was training for my pilot’s licence, there is only so much prep you can get and then you’re on your own!

Hum, ah, any extra room for one more?

Cheers, The Landy
0
FollowupID: 688491

Reply By: wendys - Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 10:33

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 10:33
I have walked the Overland Track several times, in summer months. It can be treacherous enough then. As others have said, to attempt it in winter, as a walk, is irresponsible and insane. She could be blizzarded into a hut for a long time - can she carry sufficient supplies for this? To rely on being rescued when it goes pear shaped, puts others at risk, too. I do not know the policy in Tas re this, but she may be charged much money for a rescue caused by her irresponsibility.
If she wants a challenge to help heal after a relationship rift, there are plenty of challenges in northern Aust. Suggest the Larapinta Trail to her......or the one from Katherine Gorge to Edith Falls......
AnswerID: 418384

Follow Up By: Member - Royce- Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 11:24

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 11:24
She tells me that the Overland Track is becoming very popular to do in Winter.

and.. that the difficult weather tends to be Spring rather than Winter.

I certainly understand your thoughts on irresponsible adventurers costing money and causing dangerous rescues.

I have actually had that conversation with her and she has satisfied herself that the Winter walk is commonly done. The very fact that it is challenging and different to the north Aus walks, is what has attracted her.

0
FollowupID: 688458

Reply By: Moose - Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 13:26

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 13:26
G'day Royce
You are thinking of asking to tag along! What experience do you have in those conditions? How fit are you? You'd probably just slow them down and make matters worse. So I'd scrap that plan.
Sounds to me like she'll be smart enough that she'll soon work out whether she's up to it after the first day (or less) and if she's not she'll turn back. Let her have a go. If she has all the right gear and the right mental attitude she'll most likely be fine.

AnswerID: 418405

Follow Up By: Member - Royce- Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 13:47

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 13:47
No experience.
Amazingly fit [ for my age......]

Hmmm now I realize where she gets it from. Your completely sensible, reasonable, logical comments make me really want to do it!

Believe me, if I thought that me going wouldn't spoil the whole independant point of the exercise I'd be right in there.

If her friend pulls out... .I'm in!

It will be amazing for her if she does do it successfully.
0
FollowupID: 688481

Follow Up By: Shaker - Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 16:05

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 16:05
She is a grown woman in her late 20s ... let her go!

Would you be this worried if she was a man in his late 20s?

0
FollowupID: 688508

Follow Up By: Shaker - Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 16:06

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 16:06
Forgot to mention, I also have 2 daughters now in their 30's
0
FollowupID: 688509

Follow Up By: Member - Royce- Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 18:23

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 18:23
Yes Shaker, If my son only 14 months older was doing the same thing I would be equally worried.... maybe more worried come to think of it!

He once headed off in his badly modified shorty landcruiser, with his mate to fetch more beer. Start Wonnangatta Valley .... he had no idea about the tracks as he had followed others in.

No map, just a D*ckhead mate and himself.... made it out and back by nightfall. Sure, he had a couple of hairy moments where he had to stack logs to get out of bogs and a sticky diaphram in the fuel pump which caused all sorts of problems.


Mind you, he's grown into a bit of a boring middle-aged/older than his dad type of bloke nowadays.
0
FollowupID: 688533

Reply By: Bazooka - Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 16:06

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 16:06
Royce

While I don't disagree with many of the earlier comments regarding the challenges your daughter may face hopefully I can allay your fears a little. I would describe the Overland Track as relatively friendly to WELL PREPARED inexperienced walkers - certainly not wilderness walking a la the SW of Tassie. And quite a lot of solo walkers do this trek, albeit not so much in winter.

Would certainly recommend your daughter walk with a companion (more enjoyable anyway) but if she prepares well and is sensible, (eg is prepared to pitch her tent and wait out a blizzard if it came, keep her pack handy at all times), the risks are manageable in my opinion. However she should not underestimate the likelihood of many days of bad weather in winter. At least the snakes (all poisonous) will be hibernating!

I walked the track in spring with a mate as an inexperienced teen many years ago when facilities were very basic (no board walks, old barely-weatherproof huts, very few walkers) and looking back we could have been better prepared, particularly wrt cold weather gear. But we were ready to sit out any bad weather if necessary and carried adequate food. Equipment, safety gear (no GPS' or EPIRBs then), food etc are all FAR better now than they were then. Maps of the area were very good then, likely to be excellent now I would think.

We also walked the YoYo track and South West walk a few years later (in Feb/March) - a significantly more challenging walk (no huts, few shelters, approx double the time), but another which SOLO walkers sometimes did. We followed with interest the log book comments of an 18yo solo walker who was one day ahead of us for the first 4 days of our trip. Unfortunately he left us stranded at Port Davey when he couldn't be bothered doing the 3 rows required to leave a boat on either side! As luck would have it 2 days later we were 'rescued' by a yacht which wined and dined us, and fetched both the rowboats so that we only had to do one crossing of the narrows.

Cheers
Jon
PS Your daughter might find this useful - mobile coverage in 'wilderness' Tassie: http://tasmania.bushwalk.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=21&t=415
AnswerID: 418432

Reply By: Member - Pedro the One (QLD) - Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 16:19

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 16:19
Yo, Royce ....
bit of a real dilemma for you ....... Iffen you haven't yet done it - get her to sit down at the PC and read this thread !!!

All three of my daughters finished Uni and then went and did their things ......
my eldest once did a Bunjy jump when she was about fifteen ...........
All three travelled the OS circuit - I am sure they did risky things themselves and never told me ??

Me, I would also go with the flow and say 'let her go' BUT ....
it is your job to worry, mate!
If she does it successfully she will be the better person for it .......

"If one advances confidently in the direction of their dreams
and endeavours to live the life they imagined -
they will meet with a success undreamt of, in common hours !!! "

Deep, possibly trite but very very powerful stuff.

Hope it all works out well for you both.
AnswerID: 418433

Follow Up By: Member - Royce- Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 18:27

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 18:27
Thanks Pedro.... I'm leaning towards just hanging on for he ride...

I'm pretty proud of her really.
0
FollowupID: 688534

Reply By: Member - Royce- Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 18:29

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 18:29
Well I must say that I'm pretty pleased with the response I had to this post.

I have been feeling very sad about how the forum was becoming boring and depersonalized. I find that it has much less sharing and caring happening.

Thanks everyone for your great input. I might stick around a little longer.

Cheers Royce :-]]
AnswerID: 418448

Follow Up By: jdwynn (Adelaide) - Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 20:10

Thursday, May 27, 2010 at 20:10
On'ya Royce, worthwhile post. Pls let us all know how it all goes in the end.
0
FollowupID: 688550

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (14)