Tyre Temperatures - What is the Danger Level?

Submitted: Wednesday, Jun 30, 2010 at 21:08
ThreadID: 79764 Views:6204 Replies:8 FollowUps:9
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Hi all, have just installed a SensaTyre TPMS.

Factory default for tyre temp alarm is 70 centigrade. Anyone have any ideas what the danger levels would be for a normal 4WD tyre? I would have thought that 70 is pretty hot??

Cheers.
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Reply By: Road Warrior - Wednesday, Jun 30, 2010 at 21:26

Wednesday, Jun 30, 2010 at 21:26
So I take it the temp sensor is taking that reading when you're on the fly? Does the tyre feel overly warm to touch? What part of the tyre is the reading taken from?

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Follow Up By: Member - John Baas (WA) - Wednesday, Jun 30, 2010 at 21:54

Wednesday, Jun 30, 2010 at 21:54
The sensors are taking continuous measurements - today's readings were around the high 20 degrees but it's pretty cold over here.

I was referring to the alarm default. I suppose, to re-phrase the Q; how hot would you reasonably expect a tyre to get when travelling at 110kph on the bitumen on a 42 degree day?

Cheers.
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Follow Up By: Road Warrior - Wednesday, Jun 30, 2010 at 22:26

Wednesday, Jun 30, 2010 at 22:26
Aah ok I was reading it like your tyres were at 70 degrees!

I know little about 4x4 tyres but I would imagine they wouldn't get near 70 degrees. That's pretty hot. That's what we normally maintain tyre temps at for race bikes at Barbagallo and that is with tyre warmers! They're pretty hot to touch them at this temp - too hot almost.

You've got a number of variables like tyre size, vehicle load/weight, the temperature on the day and of course your tyre pressures that will impact on what your temp readings will be. Taking a wild guess here but if the ambient was 42 degrees then expect to see 50-55 degrees on your temp gauge. That allows for the actual surface temp of the bitumen, as well as natural friction but then you also have the large surface area of the tyre to dissipate some of that heat...


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Follow Up By: Member - John Baas (WA) - Wednesday, Jun 30, 2010 at 22:33

Wednesday, Jun 30, 2010 at 22:33
Thks, looks like a consensus around the 50s is developing.

Cheers.
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Follow Up By: Mike DiD - Sunday, Jul 04, 2010 at 22:36

Sunday, Jul 04, 2010 at 22:36
On a really hot day, I wouldn't be surprised if the bitumen temperature was 70 degrees.
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Reply By: Member - Graham H (QLD) - Wednesday, Jun 30, 2010 at 22:01

Wednesday, Jun 30, 2010 at 22:01
Thats about what mine are set for and havent gone off yet.

Hottest my rear tyres got were 65 C with a full width mudflap on Chucked it and they never got over 50 even travelling in 40+ heat.

Thats while towing 2800kg


AnswerID: 422643

Follow Up By: Member - John Baas (WA) - Wednesday, Jun 30, 2010 at 22:16

Wednesday, Jun 30, 2010 at 22:16
That's very useful info Graham, thks. I was looking for a benchmark or two.

Cheers. J.
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Reply By: Rick (S.A.) - Wednesday, Jun 30, 2010 at 22:17

Wednesday, Jun 30, 2010 at 22:17
From experience in days of approx 30 to 35°, on the Stuart H'way between Tennant Creek & Alice Springs, my 265/75 R 16 tyres on bitumen got to 50°. This was at 100 kph, no trailer, 3.5t measured on weighbridge.

On dirt I travel slower + temps drop accordingly.

On the June 2010 long weekend, ambient temps about 18°, at 100kph on bitumen, towing 1.4 t trailer = 4.8t GVC, tyres got to high 20's °.

Hope this helps.
AnswerID: 422645

Follow Up By: Member - John Baas (WA) - Wednesday, Jun 30, 2010 at 22:19

Wednesday, Jun 30, 2010 at 22:19
Thanks Rick - another useful benchmark,

Cheers.
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Follow Up By: Andrew & Jen - Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 13:27

Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 13:27
Hullo John
The default is pretty close to what I have been advised by industry experts, although one suggested 65 would be his preferred max. I have never got near that figure using a hamd held infrared thermometer. Maybe have a chat with Rob Ackland - I understand he is collaborating with industry on a long term test.
Rgds
Andrew
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Reply By: Member - Barry H (WA) - Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 10:25

Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 10:25
John,

Can I be nosey and ask where you got your set of TMPS from?

I am in the market for some shortly.





Barry H
AnswerID: 422666

Follow Up By: Member - John Baas (WA) - Wednesday, Jul 14, 2010 at 22:27

Wednesday, Jul 14, 2010 at 22:27
Sorry for the late response Barry. Got it from:

Peter Spowart

Hannibal Safari Equipment

9/25 Ingleston Road

TINGALPA QLD 4173

AUSTRALIA

(P) 61 7 3348 9388

(F) 61 7 3348 9377

(M) 0408 887 442

(e) info@hannibalsafari.com.au

(w) www.hannibalsafari.com.au



Cost $630 with 6 sensors (for 2 spare wheels).


Unit worked brilliantly except for some intermittent short term loss of readings for only about 10 secs at a time. I'll follow up with Peter for the reason. Now that I've had some experience with it I can't imagine I'd ever go out again without one.

Cheers.



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Reply By: Member - Redfive - Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 14:15

Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 14:15
Hi JB

Ive had mine go off and there set at 75 that was on a very bad section of dirt road out near Cameron Corner i just slowed down for a bit and the temp droped pretty fast but in summer on tar its nothing to see 60 degs my thinking is if it a LT 4WD Tyre it would be good for a lot more than 70 even sitting out in the sun not even driving it i seen 45 to 50 just from the heat of the sun on the tyre

hope this helps

Glenn...
AnswerID: 422683

Reply By: Member - Perry H (NSW) - Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 14:17

Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 14:17
JB
Not sure what the manufacurers recommendations are, however from experience it depends a lot on what pressure /speed combination you have as to how hot they will get. I have the ones from Repco which are mounted inside the tyre on the valve. At 20psi if you go over about 30kph they will heat up after about 10mins, drop speed & they will cool. 40psi or so on the highway they will not heat up much more than a few degrees above ambient.
To answer your question I have run 79 degrees for a few hours whilst on 20psi over long corrugation sections without any ill effects on tyres & yes they are very hot to touch. Tyre are a few years old now & doesn't seem to have affected them.
AnswerID: 422684

Reply By: Member - Alex K (NSW) - Friday, Jul 02, 2010 at 18:18

Friday, Jul 02, 2010 at 18:18
Hi,
I have the Toyota factory TPMS in the 79. Driving into Albury last summer at 110kmh on freeway and a 42+ degrees day my tyres hit 65 degrees. I'm not sure how accurate they are but i know they work within a couple of degrees (tested with normal thermometer on tyre and morning reading).
Alex
AnswerID: 422798

Reply By: Mike DiD - Friday, Jul 16, 2010 at 20:31

Friday, Jul 16, 2010 at 20:31
The tyres on the sunny side will be hotter.

The tyres at the rear are hotter than the front because they are in the hot airstream off the engine.
AnswerID: 424254

Follow Up By: Member - John Baas (WA) - Friday, Jul 16, 2010 at 20:57

Friday, Jul 16, 2010 at 20:57
Thks for that Mike.

I was surmising from our CSR trip last week when we used the Sensatyre unit for the first time that it was because of the heavier weight at the rear. Clears it up nicely.

Cheers.
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