suitable axillary battery

Hi

Have recently purchased a second 40lt engel to take away with the family on camping trips (one for freezin the other for a fridge). In the past running one engel I have used a standard deep cycle battery which performed the job well. gave me a little extra power at night to run the versa light and play a couple of cd on the sterio. I should say I run a uni solar 64w solar panel through a solar inverter while camped up) and can stay in one spot for weeks like that. However now with the extra engel the old battery is not handling the extra draw. I will be running an extra 64 watt panel however need to know which battery would be most suitable to take the extra power input from both panels to run both engels. Ive been told the 100-150 ah glass gell batteries are the way to go. Anyone give us some advice or put me unto a previous blog this has been discussed

regards

dave
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Reply By: Member - Andrew (QLD) - Monday, Jul 12, 2010 at 23:46

Monday, Jul 12, 2010 at 23:46
One blog to read is John & Val's: Electricity for Camping

Hope that is a good start :)

Andrew
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Follow Up By: davidx - Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 00:10

Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 00:10
thanks
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Reply By: Battery Value Pty Ltd - Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 07:51

Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 07:51
Hello Dave,

because your 64W solar panel delivers all the juice for the one fridge plus a bit extra, two solar panels will keep you going equally well with two fridges.
Since there's not much useable solar for 16 hours every day, your battery's got to bridge this gap.
Looking at the Ah from two 64W panels reveals you get close to 40Ah useable solar energy out of them every day.
Your battery has to be able to supply at least two thirds of this (16/24) before it gets re-charged, or 26Ah.
Aiming for a depth of discharge of 50%, you're looking at a 52Ah battery capacity or better.

If you don't mind the extra weight (33.5kg) of a good 100Ah deep cycle AGM battery, get one of these.
If weight is an issue, I recommend another AGM type battery: spiral wound pure lead/tin with superior electrical and chemical properties and improved service life.
E.g. a 50Ah unit will do this for you comfortably and it only weighs 18.5kg.
And when you come back from your trip, don't forget to fully charge your battery using a good mains powered charger.
Not doing so, will jeopardise the wellbeing of your valuable battery.

There is more info in my profile, and here.

For any other questions, just let us know.

Best regards, Peter
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Follow Up By: davidx - Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 20:52

Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 20:52
What would I be looking at for a 100 Ah battery in $?
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Follow Up By: Battery Value Pty Ltd - Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 21:14

Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 21:14
$199.00 for EO members, $229.00 for non members. All inc GST.

For any other questions like s&h based on your post code pls use this form.

Best regards, Peter
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Reply By: Maîneÿ . . .- Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 09:08

Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 09:08
Dave,
Your 1 meter square (1.36 x 0.74) solar panel delivers a maximum of 64 Watts and 3.9 Amps, however various other brands of same physical size, will deliver ~120 Watts and 7+ Amps.
You can add one of these higher producing power panels, instead of using another lesser power unisolar panel to your existing unisolar panel and you can then expect a much better performing system.

AGM batteries are definitely the way to go with a solar system because they will charge fully and much faster too.
You will also need a good solar controller now with a much larger power rating.

Maîneÿ . . .
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Follow Up By: Nic I - Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 09:32

Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 09:32
Hi Mainey,

Can you please suggest some of the more efficient panel brands ?

Also, do you know of an MPPT solar regulator which displays information like the Steca PR's do (as per your tag image) ?

Cheers,

Nic

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Follow Up By: Maîneÿ . . .- Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 09:49

Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 09:49
Nic.
look at Mandrake's Solar Power website
he is a business member on EO

check out “Steve’s solar panels”
His 140 Watt (?) is my choice for a *good reasonably priced* panel :-)

There are other more expensive panels out there (Sharp etc) but I am not really positive they are better or more efficient than this panel :-)

Maîneÿ . . .
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Follow Up By: Nic I - Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 11:18

Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 11:18
Thanks Mainey. Do you know of an MPPT regulator with a decent display ?
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Follow Up By: davidx - Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 20:49

Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 20:49
Thanks for the info. All very helpful. A couple more questions.

I'm currently running my one panel through an ARrid 12 V 12Amp 3 stage solar regulator (pulse tech). Can I run both panels through this regulator?

Also regarding the axillary battery can these larger Amp batteries still be mounted under the hood? Ive been told heat produced from the motor will effect some brands? Or would you suggest purchasing a 100 amp battery and keeping it only under the hood during camping trips and then returning the original axillary battery upon my return so to extend the life of these expensive batteries. From my research your looking at at least $450-500.?

Dave
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Follow Up By: Maîneÿ . . .- Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 20:57

Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 20:57
Arrid 12v - *12 Amp* is good because, 2 x unisolar panels will be ~8 max Amps
or 1 x unisolar and 1 x 'other' is then ~10 Amps, which is still under the 12 amp regulator limit.

I would put the agm not under the hood, if I could get it somewhere else.

Maîneÿ . . .
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Reply By: Nic I - Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 09:28

Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 09:28
Hi David,

A freezer will obviously use more power than a fridge, perhaps up to twice as much, perhaps even more.

With this in mind, and as I'm also planning to add a second fridge as a freezer, have if you looked around for something more efficient than an Engel ?

Trailblazer and Explorer both have more insulation than Engel/Waeco/Evacool, and while this makes them bulkier, it also means they use less power. I imagine there are more options than these two, especially since Explorer seem to have ceased trading.


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Follow Up By: Member - Andrew (QLD) - Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 10:15

Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 10:15
i believe they have already purchased the second fridge ;)

Andrew
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Follow Up By: Nic I - Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 11:17

Tuesday, Jul 13, 2010 at 11:17
Ok, thanks.
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Reply By: WATTS2C - Wednesday, Jul 14, 2010 at 13:49

Wednesday, Jul 14, 2010 at 13:49
When considering batteries, remember that they are all fussy beasts - even the best brands need to be looked after to perform well.

Deep Cycle AGM batteries arte definitely the way to go and as for regulators, MPPT delivers at least 25% more power.

MH
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Follow Up By: Member - Andrew (QLD) - Wednesday, Jul 14, 2010 at 14:16

Wednesday, Jul 14, 2010 at 14:16
shouldn't that read "at most 25% more power"? ;)

Andrew
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Reply By: WATTS2C - Wednesday, Jul 14, 2010 at 14:22

Wednesday, Jul 14, 2010 at 14:22
no - 25% + more power. Morningstar claim up to 35% more power for their MPPT regulators but we are a little conservative and like to say around the 25% mark.

We have strong anecdotal evidence from those who have fitted Morningstar MPPT regulators to support the fact that they deliver a phenomenal amount more power.

The way MPPT is designed/set up you should be able to gaurantee at least 21% more power, and Don's electrical engineering mind tells me that you should be able to take that up to around 25%.

We haven't bench tested it, but believe the claims are true.

cheers

mh
AnswerID: 424022

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