duel wheel carrier for gu patrol

Submitted: Sunday, Jan 09, 2011 at 09:06
ThreadID: 83538 Views:4935 Replies:8 FollowUps:5
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I am looking at the high cost of a duel wheel carrier for my new patrol prices from $1790 to top of range $4500 and only needed 3 or 4 weeks a year. Is it better to just carry spare on roof rack and change it if needed.
Has anyone got the cheaper bar from Powerful 4x4 made in china I would think.
I need a bit of help to make up my mind if any one has a view.
thanks peter

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Reply By: Notso - Sunday, Jan 09, 2011 at 09:13

Sunday, Jan 09, 2011 at 09:13
I don't know if anyone else has had similar problems, but when we did the Oodnadatta Track a mate had his spare on his roof rack. One afternoon we were sitting around iand heard a loud sort of explosion. His spare on the rack had ripped the rubber from the Wire bead and blown the tyre half off the rim. Don't know if the tyre was faulty or whether the heat was just too much.
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Reply By: Dave(NSW) - Sunday, Jan 09, 2011 at 09:23

Sunday, Jan 09, 2011 at 09:23
Peter,
I have a Kaymar duel wheel carrier, They give good rear end protection (can be scraped over rock ledgers) But are heavy which reduces your carrying capacity and puts you fuel economy up. Just a few things to think about before making a decision.
Cheers Dave.
GU RULES!!

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Reply By: Member - Doug T (NT) - Sunday, Jan 09, 2011 at 09:27

Sunday, Jan 09, 2011 at 09:27
Check this one out, KN CARRIER

I have had mine since Feb 2005 and has served well and will continue to do so.
I bought it direct from the factory in Perth and it was fitted there also.

.
still going strong with 836,179 K's

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Follow Up By: Member - Doug T (NT) - Sunday, Jan 09, 2011 at 09:42

Sunday, Jan 09, 2011 at 09:42
You won't get them for this price today

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Follow Up By: Member - peter r (NSW) - Sunday, Jan 09, 2011 at 09:55

Sunday, Jan 09, 2011 at 09:55
if we can only go back

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Reply By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Sunday, Jan 09, 2011 at 09:35

Sunday, Jan 09, 2011 at 09:35
Peter, You could take just the tyre on your rack if you have some tyre changing gear. Saves around 12 kgs and breaking your back!! Michael
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Reply By: Member - Michael and Chris (QL - Sunday, Jan 09, 2011 at 10:16

Sunday, Jan 09, 2011 at 10:16
Hi Peter, My suggestion would be to learn how to strip and fit a tyre, it is not that hard once you have done it a few times. If you get a good repair kit and fix most punctures on the car, you only really need to carry a spare tyre (no rim ) on the roof too keep the weight down. If you can't repair your own wheels it wouldn't matter how many spare wheel carriers you have. Heaps cheaper also. Check out Mick O's blogs regarding how to repair and what tools you should carry on trips. Cheers Mick
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Follow Up By: Member - peter r (NSW) - Sunday, Jan 09, 2011 at 11:32

Sunday, Jan 09, 2011 at 11:32
i think the tyre on the roof rack is the way to go as i have done in the past.
can not find Mick Os blog thanks peter

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Follow Up By: Member - Michael and Chris (QL - Sunday, Jan 09, 2011 at 12:19

Sunday, Jan 09, 2011 at 12:19
Hi Peter, just go to blogs and punch in Mick O you should find them or go to most popular reseating a tubeless tyre and start from there. A word of warning, you may need to set aside some time to see all his blogs. Cheers Mick
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Reply By: Member - Warwick D (SA) - Sunday, Jan 09, 2011 at 13:09

Sunday, Jan 09, 2011 at 13:09
Greetings, I have hasd this setup for two years now.
1) Access to spares is much easier for the second puncture, and I prefer to fix punctures at a chosen camp, not on the side of the road
2) it does affect the handling a little from the extra rear weight, but a lot less than with the tyre on the roof rack
3)access through the rear door is a bit of a pain, unlocking both tyre carriers, then the rear doors.
4)this does improve rear theft security, and "Impact" cushionong in the event of a rear end collision. They can be "drilled" and locked by the owner with a padlock, if desired
5, Tne extra "step" that the carrier provides is useful to access the roof.

Overall I still choose to take the advantages of having them, in spite of the minor disadvantages of having them.
Good luck in your personal choice.
Warwick
AnswerID: 441242

Reply By: Mick O - Sunday, Jan 09, 2011 at 17:13

Sunday, Jan 09, 2011 at 17:13
Hi Peter. I have just sold my GU which a fitted an opposite lock RW carrier. They are great but as stated, they are heavy, expensive and can get a bit painful if you're in and out of the back of the wagon all the time. My fitment was needs driven. With that much added weight, by the time you get your drawers in the back, the engel, some food and tools, you'll be looking at getting a rear suspesion upgrade (or 22mm rear coils at least).

I'd say that if you already have a roofrack and space is not at a premium for you, save your money and bolt a full rim and tyre to the roofrack. Some additional advice if I might. Put the tyre on top of a piece of ply and/or a piece of faily stiff puzzle mat (camp flooring) rather than straight onto the mesh of the rack. Also use two J bolts or similar to hold it down as this will help prevent movement and any vibration may cause issues.

Heres the link to the Blog Michael was referring to.

Reseating a tyre with butane and other stuff

You might also find the video in this blog interesting as well. It's about half way through the video clip.

Joanna Spring & Masterclass on outback tyre repair.

Cheers Mick


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trip would doubtless be attended with much hardship.''
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Follow Up By: Member - peter r (NSW) - Sunday, Jan 09, 2011 at 18:56

Sunday, Jan 09, 2011 at 18:56
thanks Mick i have had a bit of practice on the Mt Davies road some years back but the 98 2.8 patrol had steel wheels now they have the alloy rims which are a bit harder but we will manage if we have to. i have used 12mm ply on the roof rack to stop rubbing. i think after the above i will put the carrier out of my mind . peter

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Reply By: Member - Roger S (WA) - Monday, Jan 10, 2011 at 01:50

Monday, Jan 10, 2011 at 01:50
Hi Peter, 6 months ago we went through the same dilemma prior to a 6 week trip to the Kimberley. I went with an ARB dual wheel carrier and long range tank for our Patrol, for a couple of reasons. Moving a spare and or jerry cans off the roof is quite difficult and heavy especially if you are doing it by yourself. Also my wife found the locking mechanism very difficult to operate on the cheaper bar as compared to the ARB bar. After speaking to a supplier in Perth who had previously stocked a cheaper bar he said that the cheaper bar had failed with cracked welds and bearing issues. That said it is a big expense for a short time however not wondering if your gear is really up to the mark was reassuring when travelling along the Gibb River road with its countless corrugations. Also the potential failure of equipment is not only costly but inconvenient if you are in a remote location. We completed the trip without any issues.
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