Wet, Slippery, Long decents, I hate them!!!!.

Submitted: Friday, Jan 21, 2011 at 23:47
ThreadID: 83807 Views:3433 Replies:11 FollowUps:10
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Not much worrys me trundling around in the 4by, But i don't care what anybody says about driving techniques, on a STEEEEEP slippery decent, when the weight of the vehicle takes over, all wheels spinning frontwards or backwards, all you can do is hang on and if you have time, say( three hail marys!) And hope to hell you don't go over a cliff, or write yourself off!.

Went close today i can tell you, Didn't really want to get rid of the landy that way,,,,LOL.


Cheers Axle.
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Reply By: Kimba10 - Saturday, Jan 22, 2011 at 00:30

Saturday, Jan 22, 2011 at 00:30
Hi Axle, have only been in that situation once in the old lux, was very steep down hill but luckily was very short and was just riding the ruts so really wasnt going to go anywhere but I hate that feeling of not been in control. The old lux had brilliant low range but when I hit that clay stuff with A/T's on it was hang on for the ride. Regards Steve
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Follow Up By: Axle - Saturday, Jan 22, 2011 at 12:15

Saturday, Jan 22, 2011 at 12:15
G/Day Steve, Sometimes you can be in to lower a gear, You can drive thru the brakes and all that, but as you say hit that wet clay and when the weight takes over, its goodbye!..lol

Axle'
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Reply By: SDG - Saturday, Jan 22, 2011 at 01:01

Saturday, Jan 22, 2011 at 01:01
The knuckles turn white. The breathing goes shallow. Heart beats faster while the adrenalin pumps out. The passengers are screaming, and your eyes are bulging out of the sockets. The sphincter closes up tighter with every inch of motion.
Mght be safer to go skydiving.

I think most of us that go four wheel driving has been in a similar situation. Me included, and I don't like it.
After its all over and done with, the question remains.....

Would we do it again?
AnswerID: 442632

Follow Up By: Member - The Bushwhackers -NSW - Saturday, Jan 22, 2011 at 11:45

Saturday, Jan 22, 2011 at 11:45
Does the tightening of the sphincter really give more traction... lol

Cheers, Dave
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Follow Up By: gbc - Sunday, Jan 23, 2011 at 07:15

Sunday, Jan 23, 2011 at 07:15
In my humble opinion - yes. But sphincter vacuum rates are directly correlated to the seat covering type. Vinyl like the 75 series ovbiously gives great traction......
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FollowupID: 714790

Reply By: The Rambler( W.A.) - Saturday, Jan 22, 2011 at 01:09

Saturday, Jan 22, 2011 at 01:09
Been there on a wet Creb trek---good exersize for the heart!
AnswerID: 442633

Follow Up By: Patrol22 - Saturday, Jan 22, 2011 at 08:28

Saturday, Jan 22, 2011 at 08:28
Me too but in a 1960s 6 wheel drive pole lifting truck! I was part of the team that put the power onto Cooktown back in the late 1960s and I tell you what that was certainly white knuckle travelling along sections of that track in the dry let alone after a shower of rain.
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Follow Up By: Axle - Saturday, Jan 22, 2011 at 12:09

Saturday, Jan 22, 2011 at 12:09
It was a power line track that near bought me undone!, carting fuel to a machine, Lantana 20ft high was my only brake....lol.


Axle.
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Reply By: donk - Saturday, Jan 22, 2011 at 07:32

Saturday, Jan 22, 2011 at 07:32
I agree

You really need to hope the the ruts are deep enough to keep you on the track,not deep enough to strand you or tip you over and not direct you off the side or into something hard

The worst thing is if you slide down you probably wont be able to drive back up again if you need to go back (good to have a winch)

Regards Don
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Reply By: Member Bushy 04(VIC) - Saturday, Jan 22, 2011 at 08:59

Saturday, Jan 22, 2011 at 08:59
Hi Axle , been there done that.
Was in a group of 4x4s with a novice driver behind me, saw what was coming and told him not to use his brakes, he though I was until he shot down to me at the bottom.
Another meter and the rear end of mine would have been bent.
It was bad enough just using the gears (white knuckle) but when he hit the brakes he just took off. ( white knuckle + change under wear).


Bushy
AnswerID: 442650

Follow Up By: Member Bushy 04(VIC) - Saturday, Jan 22, 2011 at 09:00

Saturday, Jan 22, 2011 at 09:00
Should read thought I was joking
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Reply By: Roughasguts - Saturday, Jan 22, 2011 at 10:38

Saturday, Jan 22, 2011 at 10:38
Would it help if you had snow chains on your tyres????
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Follow Up By: Crackles - Saturday, Jan 22, 2011 at 12:04

Saturday, Jan 22, 2011 at 12:04
Yes. Huge improvement.
Cheers Craig.........
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Follow Up By: Axle - Saturday, Jan 22, 2011 at 12:21

Saturday, Jan 22, 2011 at 12:21
Would help thats for sure, until they got choked up with wet clay, then it would be like a track machine,not much fun,!


Axle.
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Follow Up By: River Swaggie - Monday, Jan 24, 2011 at 09:37

Monday, Jan 24, 2011 at 09:37
You know a guy used them over last winter in Bunyip State Forest on a drive i went on...Yes they did help but then you get the other side complaining how they rip tracks up...
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Reply By: spudseamus - Saturday, Jan 22, 2011 at 10:49

Saturday, Jan 22, 2011 at 10:49
only did it once -- love bites on the jocks!!
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Reply By: GoneTroppo Member (FNQ) - Saturday, Jan 22, 2011 at 10:52

Saturday, Jan 22, 2011 at 10:52
Funny you should post this, I just had such an experience about an hour ago.

I was on a 4WD ATV, now there is not many place those things won't go, anyway we had 125mm (5 inches) of rain overnight and a lot of our tracks are hard clay which when wet is like ice, you're flat out walking on it (literally flat on your back)

There was a break in the rain only light drizzle now so I thought I'd do a couple of jobs (we live on a farm) I was coming down a steep track which as well as being slippery as can be, also has deep ruts running everywhere from where the rain has eroded it. Normally you go pretty slow to avoid tipping sideways.

I started to feel the wheels slide so I gave it a bit more throttle, starting to go sideways a bit, not good, straighten up, going a bit fast now but wheels have stopped sliding. (knuckles sure are white now) Three quarters of the way down travelling well although a bit too fast.

Only problem now was the mob of cattle I was moving to another paddock and who were following me had also speeded up as I had (it's what cattle do).
So at this stage I've got a mob of 150 cattle (about 70 tonnes of prime beef) catching up on me fast with no way of stopping (they don't get much traction on the clay either)

My knuckles had gone whatever colour they go after white. Only thing to do is to speed up and hope.

That was one hell of a bouncy, sliding, wild ride. I would never go down as fast as that in the dry when the track has just been graded let alone in todays conditions.

I got to the bottom and turned into a bit of a side track about a meter ahead of the lead cattle.

To say my heart was pounding would be putting it mildly.

The story has a funny ending. Towards the rear of the mob were two very large steers about 600kgs who were actually sliding down on their back sides and knees they must have lost their footing and couldn't get up again. The look on them was the funniest thing I've seen in long time.

I've just washed the mud off and had a strong coffee, I'm feeling much better now.






AnswerID: 442668

Follow Up By: Axle - Saturday, Jan 22, 2011 at 12:27

Saturday, Jan 22, 2011 at 12:27
Lol. , I bet they where 500kg steers when they hit the bottom .Hahahahaha!



Cheers Axle.
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Reply By: Stevesub1 - Saturday, Jan 22, 2011 at 12:19

Saturday, Jan 22, 2011 at 12:19
A couple of years ago near Brissy, we had to lead a group down a long steep very slippery track after we got caught in the forest in the rain, lets just say it was exciting not until I found a short side track 2/3rd's the way down. We shot down there, stopped, had a short breather, then started again. it was such a relief to loose all that momentum.

The next vehicle was his first time out in his 4wd and he did not do the side track, he was white as when he got down.

All the experienced drivers did what we did so there were no problems other than bleep tered nerves.

We have had quite a few experiences like this when we lived in NZ and did more wet off roading than we do now, never is nice when you are being taken for a ride and have no real control. You never get used to it.

Stevesub
AnswerID: 442677

Reply By: StormyKnight - Saturday, Jan 22, 2011 at 19:33

Saturday, Jan 22, 2011 at 19:33
It doesn't have to be wet!

A step track with basically ball bearings as a road surface I did a few times in my 60 series. Being a Manual Diesel it had a very good low range 1st gear.

But at every diagonal contour bank the tyres would slip & the car felt like it was falling it took off so fast, only to skid back to normal when grip returned. Made the passengers look over the edge (inwhich you could see the bottom) in horror!

But its any length longer than a car length of steep clay that is always interesting - oddly, going up can be easier than going down with decent tyres.

AnswerID: 442742

Reply By: Robin Miller - Monday, Jan 24, 2011 at 10:51

Monday, Jan 24, 2011 at 10:51
Sounds like you had a moment like in thread 68264 Axle. Good to see you survived.

Now admit, it is a lot of fun afterwards when you don't hit anything.

Its during such moments the true worth of low C of G , narrower tyres etc
and probably traction control (if you had it ) become more than academic.
Robin Miller

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AnswerID: 442881

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