Cocklebiddy to Rawlinna Track Photos for Alan

Submitted: Friday, Jan 28, 2011 at 21:31
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Hi Alan

In reply to Alan's (equinox) latest Blog and at his request, here are some pictures when we drove the track in August last year. We wanted to get away from the black stuff and head to theTrans Access Road. When asking at the Cocklebiddy Roadhouse about the track conditions, the two chaps behind the counter both looked at each other and said it was a horror track. When Fiona said that we were used to travelling in remote areas and everyone has a different view on track conditions, you could see the looks on their face and if I was a mind reader, the reply would have to be censored. We took around 5 hours all up to travel the 144 kilometres and spent one night on the track. The first 30 kilometres were in perfect condition all the way to Arubiddy station and was possible to sit comfortably around 80 kilometres per hour and from there on the was travelling was slow, between 20 - 40 kilometres per hour.

Yes it was rock covered and slow, but it was a great drive and would do it again tomorrow - well not really, as I have to work. So if you are travelling west or east along the Eyre Highway and want a great detour, it is well worth the drive.

Here they are Alan


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Reply By: Dasher Des - Friday, Jan 28, 2011 at 21:48

Friday, Jan 28, 2011 at 21:48
Nice Photo's Stephen, When we did the track about 5 years ago, we had to stop a couple of times to find the track as the area was covered in wildflowers and you literally couldn't see the track. We didn't have the benefits of the signs either and ended up at the Rawlinna Station house. We camped at the bottom of the Connie Sue but as we were travelling solo and had a sidewall stake from a rock, we weren't game to continue up the Connie with only 1 decent spare tyre then. The Transcontinental road was a really good road and much more scenic than the highway.
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Friday, Jan 28, 2011 at 22:17

Friday, Jan 28, 2011 at 22:17
Hi Dasher Des,

It was great out there and if Fiona had her way, we would have camped along the Trans Access Line for a week, it was that great.

We were also travelling solo. We had all the safety gear and were never concerned at any stage. The solitude out there was unreal and the stars were unreal.

Cheers

Stephen
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Reply By: equinox - Friday, Jan 28, 2011 at 22:04

Friday, Jan 28, 2011 at 22:04
Thanks for that Stephen.

We were headed down the Connie Sue then onto Cocklebiddy. At that stage we we about 4 days ahead of schedule so we explored the coast a bit.

The photos bring back memories, I didn't take many pictures in that section after Neale Junction.

The photo of the last gate (or first gate for us) hasn't changed much !!!

Regards
Alan


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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Friday, Jan 28, 2011 at 22:23

Friday, Jan 28, 2011 at 22:23
Hi Alan

There must be more people doing the track now, compared to when you did it and Dasher Des. I feel the signs have been put in to make sure people keep on track and do not end up at Rawlinna Station like Dasher Des did.

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Stephen
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Reply By: Rod W - Friday, Jan 28, 2011 at 22:43

Friday, Jan 28, 2011 at 22:43
I seem to recall there is something in the vacinity of 30 gates to open and shut so hence the official gate keeper is a must. I know it wasn't me as I was the driver.
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Friday, Jan 28, 2011 at 22:47

Friday, Jan 28, 2011 at 22:47
Hi Rod

Yes a gate girl or young child is a must, that is for sure.


Cheers


Stephen
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Reply By: Member - Phil B (WA) - Saturday, Jan 29, 2011 at 08:07

Saturday, Jan 29, 2011 at 08:07
Great photos as usual Stephen.

However I thought you being a gentleman would do the right thing and let Fiona drive and you open the gates!

Phil
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Saturday, Jan 29, 2011 at 08:19

Saturday, Jan 29, 2011 at 08:19
Hi Phil

Fiona did such a great job and I have to have her full marks...well nearly. There were 2 gates where she could not undo and I had to lend a helping hand.

When Fiona read what I had posted, she said that I should have called her the 'Gate Girl' and not the gate opener.


Take care.



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Stephen
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Reply By: Peter_n_Margaret - Saturday, Jan 29, 2011 at 12:27

Saturday, Jan 29, 2011 at 12:27
I spent 3 weeks on the Nullarbor in December 1954 with a group exploring caves (I was 9 years old).
Fences were rare and gates were rarer still, but the fences that did exist were just 2 strands of wire with posts 50mm apart. The passenger stepped on the top wire and you drove across... :-)
Sheep saw so few fences that they would not go near one!

Cheers,
Peter
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Saturday, Jan 29, 2011 at 14:15

Saturday, Jan 29, 2011 at 14:15
Hi Peter

That would have been a great time back then. At least in that part of the country, apart from the fences and gates, nothing else would have changed a great deal.


Cheers


Stephen
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Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Sunday, Jan 30, 2011 at 07:14

Sunday, Jan 30, 2011 at 07:14
It is just as fragile too.
I recall the guide that we had following the wheel tracks from a single vehicle that he had driven to some caves 20 years before.
Never forgot that lesson......

Cheers,
Peter
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Follow Up By: Member - Graham H (QLD) - Sunday, Jan 30, 2011 at 10:16

Sunday, Jan 30, 2011 at 10:16
50mm apart?????????????????????





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