Mits Triton rear diff issues-help!

Submitted: Tuesday, Nov 11, 2003 at 10:38
ThreadID: 8437 Views:2090 Replies:5 FollowUps:8
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Hi,
Looking for a bit of technical help. I have a 99 Mits Triton DC GLS (manual) v6. When 4wd is engaged, the thing is bloody hard to turn at slow speeds, it jumps around,shutters etc, almost as if the diff is locked.

As far as I know, the Tritons come with LSD's and there are no switches or buttons for a manually operated diff lock.

whats going on and how bad for the vehicle is this?, is there a gremlin here or is this a triton thing?
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Reply By: Tony - Tuesday, Nov 11, 2003 at 10:44

Tuesday, Nov 11, 2003 at 10:44
Sounds a bit like the clutches are sticking in the LSD but then it would happen in 2WD as well. Are you sure it's not the front diff thats causing the problem.

The next thing is to change the oil's in bith diffs, replacing it with a good LSD oil and see if that makes ant difference.
AnswerID: 36825

Reply By: Leroy - Tuesday, Nov 11, 2003 at 11:15

Tuesday, Nov 11, 2003 at 11:15
Hey Joe,

Are you enaging 4wd and driving on a hard surface?
Leroy
AnswerID: 36828

Follow Up By: joem - Tuesday, Nov 11, 2003 at 11:18

Tuesday, Nov 11, 2003 at 11:18
Yes, sorry, should have clarified. Its on the tarmac that it is happening.
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Follow Up By: Tony - Tuesday, Nov 11, 2003 at 11:36

Tuesday, Nov 11, 2003 at 11:36
Well, enough said.
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Follow Up By: Leroy - Tuesday, Nov 11, 2003 at 12:27

Tuesday, Nov 11, 2003 at 12:27
Joe Joe Joe.....if you want to break a drive shaft or something then you are on the right track. As someone has already mentioned, read the owners manual. You need a car with a viscous centre dif lock coupling!!

Leroy
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Reply By: floyd - Tuesday, Nov 11, 2003 at 12:03

Tuesday, Nov 11, 2003 at 12:03
Read the owners manual about engageing 4WD. It will probably tell you not to do this.

My simple advice to you is DON'T DO IT!!!

I dont know of any part time 4WD that will steer and drive normally on the tarmac. Full time 4WD vehicles are different as they have an unlocked transfer case that allows the front wheels and back wheels to travel more or less independantly of each other while both having drive from the engine. These vehicles have a centre diff lock so that you can manually lock the transfer case up when on slippery surfaces only.

If you use the 4WD system in your car while on hard surfaces like bitumen then you run a real risk of damage to the vehicle. The CV joints may break or at worst the transfer case may break. Both these are expensive to fix. Best case scenario you risk putting large strain on your drive train (uni joints, diffs gearbox, tyres etc) which may cause premature failure.

This is not a LSD problem as rear units perform the same weather in 2WD or 4WD.

If you have a front locker installed (aftermarket product that operates whenever the front diff is turned) then this may be contributing to th esteering problem and noises that you are hearing.

The jumping around and shuddering will be the tyres being pushed against each other because the transfer case is trying to rotate all wheels at the same rate. If you continue driving it in 4WD on hard surfaces the jumping around and shuddering will be replaced by the sound of snapping axles, breaking CV joints or the transfer case breaking into lots of pieces of metal.

Hope that this helps.
AnswerID: 36831

Follow Up By: joem - Tuesday, Nov 11, 2003 at 12:16

Tuesday, Nov 11, 2003 at 12:16
Thanks Floyd, bloody helpful info,thanks for taking the time , I didnt know about the difference between fulltime 4wd and parttime 4wd capabilities.

From some of the replies, this must be basic stuff, but it was great to get it explained.
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Follow Up By: floyd - Tuesday, Nov 11, 2003 at 13:26

Tuesday, Nov 11, 2003 at 13:26
Any time Jo, this forum is a great place to learn about a lot of stuff. I have learnt heaps here. Remember that there is no such thing as a dumb question. You occasionally may get a dumb answer though. Just ignore them.
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Follow Up By: Leroy - Tuesday, Nov 11, 2003 at 13:50

Tuesday, Nov 11, 2003 at 13:50
Joe,

You would not of known if you didn't ask! Maybe you should look into doing a 4wd course or joining a club (they usually have couses). Great places for learning things.

Leroy
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Reply By: Wombat (Victoria) - Tuesday, Nov 11, 2003 at 12:19

Tuesday, Nov 11, 2003 at 12:19
Hi joem,

Sounds to me that the good old Triton is just doing what it was built to do. Stop treating it so meanly - you big bully! "Live today as if there may be no tomorrow"

Wombat
AnswerID: 36833

Follow Up By: jonny knowalittlebit - Tuesday, Nov 11, 2003 at 16:25

Tuesday, Nov 11, 2003 at 16:25
Hows your triton going wombat?

Ive just repleced the rear main seal and had a new clutch kit put in.
One thing for shore is the first question i asked when i bought it was if it was normal that the thrust bearing made so much noise.
And after having the new clutch kit put in guess what the new thrust bearing make the exact same noise. A little bit of good out of a crap situation.

Guy
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Follow Up By: Wombat (Victoria) - Tuesday, Nov 11, 2003 at 17:00

Tuesday, Nov 11, 2003 at 17:00
Hi Jonny,

All's well with the Wombatmobile (as expected). If a noisy thrust bearing is all I have to contend with then I think I'll be as happy with our second Triton as we were with the first.

Although I did sit in a F250 Ford the other weekend and well . . . . hmmmm - you never know."Live today as if there may be no tomorrow"

Wombat
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Reply By: Nav 80 - Tuesday, Nov 11, 2003 at 12:23

Tuesday, Nov 11, 2003 at 12:23
Floyds comments are correct, also it is important to make sure you have the same size tyres and tyre profile all round . If not then you will get what is called transmission wind up, that is the front diff fighting the rear diff through the transmission because of the different sizes. There is always going to be a little difference even with the correct tyres due to wear etc but this is ok on dirt as the tyres can slip to compensate. On the hard surface this can not happen and you will get what you are experienceing, transmission wind up, and the result will be as Floyd has mentioned.
AnswerID: 36834

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