Hi lift jacks

Submitted: Monday, Nov 17, 2003 at 23:32
ThreadID: 8591 Views:3927 Replies:16 FollowUps:15
This Thread has been Archived
Hi- just a quick question. We were going to buy a hi lift jack for our troopy (it's an ex Britz Australia camper version) & a friend told us we were mad & to get a trolley jack instead as they have a wider base, you don't have to lift the suspension up & they're cheaper. What does the panel think?!
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Truckster (Vic) - Monday, Nov 17, 2003 at 23:49

Monday, Nov 17, 2003 at 23:49
Hilift jacks can be dangerous.. 2 times we used one, both times car fell off.

Do you NEED a high lift?? they are mainly used for recoverys out of deep ruts and crap.

Trolley jack.. how much room do you want to take up??

A good quality Bottle Jack is the go.
AnswerID: 37623

Reply By: Truckster (Vic) - Monday, Nov 17, 2003 at 23:49

Monday, Nov 17, 2003 at 23:49
Hilift jacks can be dangerous.. 2 times we used one, both times car fell off.

Do you NEED a high lift?? they are mainly used for recoverys out of deep ruts and crap.

Trolley jack.. how much room do you want to take up??

A good quality Bottle Jack is the go.
AnswerID: 37624

Follow Up By: Mark from Getaway Portable Refrigerator Hire - Monday, Nov 17, 2003 at 23:57

Monday, Nov 17, 2003 at 23:57
Hey Truckster, One reply is quite enough.........:-)
0
FollowupID: 27240

Reply By: Mark - Monday, Nov 17, 2003 at 23:52

Monday, Nov 17, 2003 at 23:52
Obviously your friend only changes tyres on a concrete driveway!!!

A hilift jack has soooo many other uses, like bead breaker, hand winch (with correct chains), sideways walking of car plus its use as a jack to change tyres. Ever tried changing a tyre thats peeled of a rim while stuck in a gully half way up a hill, try that with a trolley jack.

As for a wider base, I always carry a bit of 12mm formwork ply as a jack base. Even a trolley jack would sink on sand.

Cheers

Mark
AnswerID: 37625

Follow Up By: Member - DOZER- Thursday, Nov 20, 2003 at 21:24

Thursday, Nov 20, 2003 at 21:24
Hi Mark
Was told of a good one about the best jack base. One shovel. Doubles as an applicator ubder muddy 4b's
Andrewwheredayathinkwer mike?
0
FollowupID: 27540

Reply By: Mark from Getaway Portable Refrigerator Hire - Monday, Nov 17, 2003 at 23:54

Monday, Nov 17, 2003 at 23:54
Ann & Steve, Nothing personal but I think your friend is mad, only jokin. What do you want the jack for?
If it is for the garage then he or she is not mad but if it is for out and about then the news is not good!!
You can use : a) Hi Lift jack- If you have somewhere to lift the vehicle from and can be unstable. can be used for other tasks.
b) Bull bag - Good in sand
c) Bottle Jack -Good with base plate and something to run the flat tyre onto so that you can get the jack under the axle.

All depends on what you need.

Regards

Mark
AnswerID: 37627

Reply By: Paul - Monday, Nov 17, 2003 at 23:58

Monday, Nov 17, 2003 at 23:58
Hi,
i think you hit the nail right on the head. I bought a Highlift, tried it out a couple of times at home until I realised the thing was inherently dangerous by design. Now I carry a trolley jack wrapped in an old blanket behind the seat. Its far less dangerous, much easier to use and I'd reckon if I ever encountered mud (not a likely occurence around the Isa and Boulia) it'd be a lot easier to pack-up to stop it sinking into the ground.
I reckon the Highlifts are only good for one things, SHOW.
However, if you change your mind I've got one going cheap only used twice, never in anger.
Paul
AnswerID: 37628

Follow Up By: Slammin - Tuesday, Nov 18, 2003 at 00:36

Tuesday, Nov 18, 2003 at 00:36
Geeze Paul, what if it's muddy and the water is above the diff? I thought that when it rains in the Boulia area it does so in a big way?

Personally I reckon that trolley jacks are only good for people who want to pretend to be mechanics or know what they are talking about.

I reckon I would get a good laugh with you if you had to change a tyre on a hill and the trolley jack is rolling down the hill as it takes the weight of the vehicle. Or do you chock the vehicle and the trolley jack wheels as well......not many hills in Boulia area as well?

0
FollowupID: 27242

Follow Up By: Truckster (Vic) - Tuesday, Nov 18, 2003 at 10:35

Tuesday, Nov 18, 2003 at 10:35
Hilifts are designed to slide sideways on the base, they are to lift cars up and then slide sideways out of ruts. Not for use on driveways etc..
but still bleep in dangerous.
0
FollowupID: 27269

Follow Up By: Chris (W.A.) - Thursday, Nov 20, 2003 at 23:23

Thursday, Nov 20, 2003 at 23:23
That's exactly why my jack's on the spare wheel carrier....to show off....what sort of crap is that?
Obviously you've never done any offroad recovery work by yourself without assistance. There's more to recovery work than a shovel and a mates snatchstrap.
Explain why all the military vehicles and emergency vehicles in the country areas carry them.

And I'm 'showing' it off because it's safer outside the vehicle and gives me more storage room.

Regards

Nice southerly coastal fishing trip someday.
Chris
0
FollowupID: 27552

Follow Up By: Truckster (Vic) - Friday, Nov 21, 2003 at 12:56

Friday, Nov 21, 2003 at 12:56
Who has never done recovery on their own??

And Rural Fire Service dont carry High Lifts in NSW.. :)~
0
FollowupID: 27583

Follow Up By: Chris (W.A.) - Friday, Nov 21, 2003 at 21:40

Friday, Nov 21, 2003 at 21:40
I was referring to Paul, I don't think ours do either and there's not much need as our local FESA only have a HZJ75 and the tender is not 4wd...I was targetting the SES & Police. I guess the Hi lift is more versatile than a bottle, trolley or bullbag. Of course not every recovery requires a high lift but I know how to use mine and never had it go sideways or collapse especially with four jack points which are better than just putting the foot under a smooth edge. I even buried it on the Alkimos beach once to winch out which was a damn sight quicker than burying a tyre.
I find my bottle jack doesn't lift high enough anyway. If I change a tyre and only in the bush would I use a high lift for this I throw the spare under the chassis as a safeguard in case it does collapse or whatever the case may be.
RegardsNice southerly coastal fishing trip someday.
Chris
0
FollowupID: 27620

Follow Up By: Truckster (Vic) - Saturday, Nov 22, 2003 at 10:43

Saturday, Nov 22, 2003 at 10:43
The reason the baseplates move side to side on Hilifts, is they are designed to roll off...

When you are stuck in a rut etc, you lift the car, and pull the jack back so it moves the car out of rut, basically collapsing the jack sideways onto the ground..
0
FollowupID: 27633

Reply By: Willem - Tuesday, Nov 18, 2003 at 00:09

Tuesday, Nov 18, 2003 at 00:09
Carry a Hi lift jack and a Trolley Jack and a Bull bag....no worries.

As said before...a Hi lift jack has many uses. They are potentially dangerous if you drop one on someones head :-))) Don't climb in under the vehicle while jacking with a Hi lift. It is all a matter of common sense.

Cheers,
Willem

Always going somewhere
AnswerID: 37630

Reply By: Slammin - Tuesday, Nov 18, 2003 at 00:25

Tuesday, Nov 18, 2003 at 00:25
Ahhhh the old hi lift debate an oldie but a goodie not unlike the fats V skinny's, tubeless V splits, minnies v tight jeans, ya gotta love it.

If you only use a hi lift a couple of times then yes it probly is dangerous for some, but with some commonsense, practice and an idea of your vehicles balance they are easier and much, much faster than anything else (change a tyre in 43'+ with 4'000 flies in your face, ears, nose etc in less than 5 mins, incl putting the spare back and you learn to use and love your hilift) it is also very versatile as indicated above. It is also for my money a lot better than putting your bottle jack underwater.

The bottle jack also is a good piece of kit better on hills than a hi lift and can also be used to panelbeat in restricted spaces.

Personally I wouldn't include a trolley jack unless you have physical problems geting under the vehicle, or the vehicle is much much heavier than yours and you don't mind wrestling a trolley jack in the sand or dirt. Or are 100% on the blacktop and for some reason prefer it.

I would reccomend carrying both hi lift and a bottle jack esp. if in remote areas.
AnswerID: 37631

Reply By: Ann & Steve - Tuesday, Nov 18, 2003 at 00:37

Tuesday, Nov 18, 2003 at 00:37
Thanks for the feedback. Actually, the guy who advised us is a retired driller & has spent the best part of the last 30 years in the outback in WA- we were just surprised at his advice as it was the first time we had heard of using a trolley jack. It's given us food for thought, anyhow.
AnswerID: 37632

Reply By: Member - Bob - Tuesday, Nov 18, 2003 at 06:41

Tuesday, Nov 18, 2003 at 06:41
It comes down to weight. You can carry all sorts of gear that you may never use, if weight weren't a problem. I used to carry a high lift jack but I have found that for remote desert and rough road use it has no advantage over the lighter and more compact bottle jack. On one occasion, despite my best efforts at chocking etc, the car slid sideways off the H/L jack and bent the shaft. For me the best compromise is to leave the H/L at home.Bob
AnswerID: 37640

Reply By: Member - Eric- Tuesday, Nov 18, 2003 at 07:28

Tuesday, Nov 18, 2003 at 07:28
Guys , I only use the hight lift to take the major load off the smaller jack , I pick up the weight of the vehicle without lifting the wheels off the ground , then I use the factory jack with a piece of ply Venus Bay
AnswerID: 37643

Reply By: CT - Tuesday, Nov 18, 2003 at 16:21

Tuesday, Nov 18, 2003 at 16:21
Ann & Steve,
I am a firm believer in a highlifter and a bottle jack. Highlifters are heavy, dangerous, and when you are seriously stuck, one of the best things to have.

Change tyres with the bottle. The purpose for which it was designed. A trolly jack will do this to but was never designed for recovery.

If you go a highlifter, purchase a jack adaptor bracket that will allow you to safely locate the jack and lift off the wheel/hub assembly. Only about $30 and saves having to lift the vehicle body numerous times just to clear the suspension from an object.

Practice at home, read the instructions, and wear gloves and boots.
Cheers
Craig
AnswerID: 37685

Follow Up By: Ann & Steve - Tuesday, Nov 18, 2003 at 22:18

Tuesday, Nov 18, 2003 at 22:18
Thanks for the great advice,especially about the practice at home bit- garden isn't in yet in the new house- so have a few sand hills to play with!
0
FollowupID: 27348

Reply By: Charlie - Tuesday, Nov 18, 2003 at 17:17

Tuesday, Nov 18, 2003 at 17:17
I’ve fabricated a bigger baseplate / car stand for the hi lift jack and its solves most of the stability problems if necessary.
Charlie
AnswerID: 37691

Reply By: Charlie - Tuesday, Nov 18, 2003 at 17:17

Tuesday, Nov 18, 2003 at 17:17
I’ve fabricated a bigger baseplate / car stand for the hi lift jack and its solves most of the stability problems if necessary.
Charlie
AnswerID: 37692

Follow Up By: Member - JohnR - Wednesday, Nov 19, 2003 at 08:22

Wednesday, Nov 19, 2003 at 08:22
Charlie I agree with your first one.

I have a bit of 6"x2" hard wood screwed to the base, basicly because it grips to surfaces. It also gixes me a higher lift and it fits to stop it rattling in my underbody tool box.

John
0
FollowupID: 27373

Reply By: Member - Ken - Tuesday, Nov 18, 2003 at 23:05

Tuesday, Nov 18, 2003 at 23:05
Anne & Steve

We have a troopy that I have purpose converted to a pop top camper; that when loaded for a trip comes in at 3.5t ( plus sometimes).

Space & weight have always been a problem when putting it together over the past 3 years and as a result of the 'give & take comprise' that goes with this situation we carry a high lift and air bag/jack. (Plus a heap of other recovery gear)

I carry a piece of Aluminium Chequer plate to increase the 'footprint' for stability, however have never had to use the c/plate to date.

Also I have never had it 'rocking around where it gave any indication that it was going to slip sideways. I am a aware of and know how to carry out the 'side movement' manouver thats been mentioned, however I would have to be scraping the bottom of the option bin before I used it though. ( mainly from a potential damage situation rather than safety)

CT'S post above is spot on, especially about having the correct lift points or lift accessory kit to fit your vehicle. I have a KAYMAR rear bar which you can use a high lift anywhere along it, or if the vehicle has sunk so far, or is in a difficult situation I use that $30 lift attachment that CT mentioned. I have a purpose built lift attachment for the front TJM bar. (Bolts onto left and front tow positions)

I also have an attachment to fit the Troopys wheel hubs that allows for a CONTROLLED vertical lift out of holes etc. (The key word here being CONTROLLED)

Also as Willie mentioned, use your self preservation mode combined with common sense and the High Lift is a magic piece of equipment.

Abuse it and it will bite you on the arse.

Ours fits out of the way in dust bag on the KAYMAR spare tyre carrier.

Anyway at the end of the day its 'horses for courses' and what you feel is best for your situation and what you can handle.

Hope this gives you a few more ideas/clues to ruminate on.

Regards

Ken Robinson
AnswerID: 37752

Follow Up By: andyc - Wednesday, Nov 19, 2003 at 11:28

Wednesday, Nov 19, 2003 at 11:28
Hi Ken,

" also have an attachment to fit the Troopys wheel hubs" - where did you source this magic sounding piece of equipment?

AC
0
FollowupID: 27398

Follow Up By: Member - Ken - Wednesday, Nov 19, 2003 at 18:52

Wednesday, Nov 19, 2003 at 18:52
Andy

I bought it at Duncan's 4WD Centre on North Road, Oakleigh, Victoria.

Ken Robinson
0
FollowupID: 27440

Reply By: bigboy - Wednesday, Nov 19, 2003 at 20:11

Wednesday, Nov 19, 2003 at 20:11
I HAVE A HI-LIFT JACK ....
IT COULD BE DANGEROUS IF YOU USED IF WRONG ..
I CUT AND WELDED HOLES IN THE BULL BAR - REAR BUMPER ETC
THAT HOLD THE JACK FROM SLIPPING OUT ..
I GOT MYSELF THIS JACK BECAUSE I GO BEOND K-MART -COLES ETC CAR PARK..
WHERE I GO YOU WOULD BE LUCKY TO SEE ANYONE FOR DAYS
RACQ IS N.F.G OUT THERE.. THATS IT YOU KNOW WHERE ARE ANY WAY ...
I HAVE 2 HI-LIFT JACKS AND 1 OF THEM IS FOR SALE
RING ME ON 07 46696639
AnswerID: 37849

Reply By: Simon - Thursday, Nov 20, 2003 at 14:00

Thursday, Nov 20, 2003 at 14:00
Hi lift jacks are for show ponies who want people to think they are realy cool off roaders.

Realy cool off roaders dont use them tho.

Trolley jacks ok if you got the room, if not a couple of bottle jacks take up no room.
A screw type bottle jack is always handy as well as a scissor type jack.
AnswerID: 37921

Follow Up By: Truckster (Vic) - Saturday, Nov 22, 2003 at 10:44

Saturday, Nov 22, 2003 at 10:44
Realy cool off roaders dont use them tho.

It is school holidays isnt it..
Its REALLY...

and shows what you know boy.. Try Outerlimits and ask how many carry Hi Lifts...
0
FollowupID: 27634

Follow Up By: Simon - Saturday, Nov 22, 2003 at 10:53

Saturday, Nov 22, 2003 at 10:53
Basicly you are nothing more than a licked out waste of space.

Have you truly had some severe head trauma??

If so I apologise.
0
FollowupID: 27636

Follow Up By: Truckster (Vic) - Saturday, Nov 22, 2003 at 11:09

Saturday, Nov 22, 2003 at 11:09
If you cant take being proven wrong, then dont even dream of pretending to be smart.. Its WAaaaaaaaaaayyyyyyyyyyyyy beyond you.

Thankfully school holidays dont last for ever..
0
FollowupID: 27638

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)