Yabbies in The Cooper

Submitted: Friday, Jun 24, 2011 at 23:04
ThreadID: 87181 Views:5619 Replies:9 FollowUps:14
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Attention All Yabbie Experts

The good thing about living in a small country town, is that everyone knows everyone business. Seeing that I have a great love of the Outback, many locals come up to me at work and ask various questions on the bush.

One such chap that I know works up at Moomba and just last week he came in and told me of the latest happenings up at Innamincka and what was happening in the Cooper.

One such story was that there are some parts of the Cooper that are just crawling with yabbies - literally. He said that there were thousands of them, and coming from the chap I knew that what he said was true.

Low and behold, I received an email tonight from Keith in Victoria, who mentioned that he had been following the forum and was given these incredible photos of what I was told about by one of the Clare locals.

Can anyone give an explanation as to why the Yabbies are like this, as Keith and I would both like to know why.

If you have seen them like this, perhaps you may also like to share your images.


All images supplied by and given permission by Keith to show you all.


Have a Great Weekend.


Cheers


Stephen
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Reply By: Member - Graham N (SA) - Friday, Jun 24, 2011 at 23:47

Friday, Jun 24, 2011 at 23:47
Hi Stephen,
We were up at Ski Beach Innamincka about ten days ago and had the yabbie nets out over night and only caught about 50 small fish I can see why now all the yabbies were off to get their photos taken.

Cheers
Graham
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Saturday, Jun 25, 2011 at 08:05

Saturday, Jun 25, 2011 at 08:05
Hi Graham

I bet things are looking great up at Innamincka at the moment. We are heading back up there again in a months time. so with all the water dropping, we are hoping that most sites are open again. What Eric told me was the Yabbies were that dense, they never used a net, but dragged their large esky through the water and the esky was completely full, He said that they were eating yabbies for days, but could not remember the location where they got them.

Thanks for the reply.



Cheers


Stephen
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Follow Up By: Member - Graham N (SA) - Saturday, Jun 25, 2011 at 08:26

Saturday, Jun 25, 2011 at 08:26
Hi Stephen,
Things sure are looking good at Innamincka the Stzelecki track is as smooth as a bitumen road at the moment, they seem to have had a change of menu at the Outamincka bar and the meals are superb probably the best I've tasted in the 'outback'.
We heard they were caching yabbies with a beer box, you would want to get a few in the first effort LOL.

Cheers
Graham
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Saturday, Jun 25, 2011 at 08:37

Saturday, Jun 25, 2011 at 08:37
Hi Graham

To be fair with the Innamincka Pub, we have never had a bad meal there yet, touch wood, and on the way up, you are always guaranteed a great meal at the Copley Pub.

There is one iconic outback pub that we have had fare too many bad meals, that we would never waste our money there again....Birdsville!

Some will now defend it but like I have said, one bad meal in not good, but many is very bad.

Great to hear the Strez is like that and counting down the days.



Cheers


Stephen
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Reply By: get outmore - Saturday, Jun 25, 2011 at 00:28

Saturday, Jun 25, 2011 at 00:28
lack of oxgen or some other habitat destruction

- some rippers in there

BTW its a turtle nowadays

they used to be know as tortoises to differentiate them from sea turtles and the truly aquatic pig nose turtle but that went by the by and now there turtles

i think too many people were associating tortoise with the land dwelling models found elswwhere
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Saturday, Jun 25, 2011 at 08:09

Saturday, Jun 25, 2011 at 08:09
Hi get out more

Yes indeed, there are some big bugger in that lot. Thanks for the explanation as to why they seem to be on the move.

I was not aware that there was a name change to turtle, so thanks for the update.

Have a great weekend.


Cheers


Stephen
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Follow Up By: The Explorer - Saturday, Jun 25, 2011 at 14:43

Saturday, Jun 25, 2011 at 14:43
Hi

Turtle is the Macquarie Turtle Emydura macquari.

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Greg
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Saturday, Jun 25, 2011 at 16:52

Saturday, Jun 25, 2011 at 16:52
GHi Greg

Thanks for that.



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Stephen
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Reply By: Member - Bucky - Saturday, Jun 25, 2011 at 04:18

Saturday, Jun 25, 2011 at 04:18
That's amazing Stephen !

Last year at the Innamincka Common they tasted real good, but the numbers in your photograph, are incredible.

Hope you got your share
CHeers
Bucky
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Saturday, Jun 25, 2011 at 08:13

Saturday, Jun 25, 2011 at 08:13
Hi Bucky

The thanks go to Keith for allowing me to put the images up on the forum, thanks Keith.

When I first head the story from Eric here in Clare, it seemed very hard to believe and the numbers that some people were collecting seemed unreal, but now I can see why.

Have a Great Day.



Cheers


Stephen
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Reply By: Member - Joe n Mel n kids (FNQ - Saturday, Jun 25, 2011 at 10:02

Saturday, Jun 25, 2011 at 10:02
wow, thats interesting, my guess is that it is nothing out of the "ordinary" given we se above the waterline thousands and thousands of birds appear from seemingly noware and breed double the norm rate then my guess it is also happening below the water in order to maintain the "food cycle" .....
Last wet season it was wetter as in more rain and higher levels in the rivers, this year lower levels but more consistant rains and with it came zillions of frogs, i mean zillions of native frogs (thats really good) like i have never seen, flying insects were bad also, so my guess it runs into the Gulf and the prawn season will be big .....
About five years ago i had a freind in Maningrida fishing a bit up the river, all was just a normal day until he noticed all this stuff floating down the river, looked like logs, it was CROCS of about 1-2 m long, thousands and all heading out to sea, went on for about 1/2 an hour then just stopped, he said he has never seen so many crocs in one spot and all heading out to sea like some migration ......
We probally live in a land of extremes a little like up north east coast this year, everyone calls it a "bad" year, big cyclones and the worst floods ............. it was simply a really GOOD wet season and Australia needs it.
Cheers
Joe
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Saturday, Jun 25, 2011 at 16:55

Saturday, Jun 25, 2011 at 16:55
Hi Joe

Yes mother nature can sure through in so special events.

I don't think that I would have been comfortable out fishing with your friend...those floating log, I think I would rather see the Yabbies...LOL


Thanks for your reply.



Cheers


Stephen
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Reply By: Skippype - Saturday, Jun 25, 2011 at 16:23

Saturday, Jun 25, 2011 at 16:23
Stephen
I have seen that twice in the past 30 years. It was like that at Durrum Downs on the Cooper near Ballera about 2 weeks ago. We had yabbies for days. Just using a shovel to pick them up.
I don't know what causes it but when it happens it is spectacular.
Skip
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Saturday, Jun 25, 2011 at 16:59

Saturday, Jun 25, 2011 at 16:59
Hi Skip

It must be a very special sight to see, that is for sure. My son was based out at Ballera surveying for the Gas Line and said it was a great camp, and now doing the same survey work out of Injune, north of Roma.


Have a safe trip back home.



Cheers



Stephen
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Reply By: Will 76 Series - Sunday, Jun 26, 2011 at 19:22

Sunday, Jun 26, 2011 at 19:22
Stephen,

That is unreal. I was there a last year after the rains and peope were catching fish in a milk crate as the fish were gathering at the bridge washway trying to get up stream over the causeway. Unreal to see this!
What an amazing difference water can make to this unique country.
Thanks for the photo's.

regards Will
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Sunday, Jun 26, 2011 at 19:32

Sunday, Jun 26, 2011 at 19:32
Hi Will

That is exactly what I said when I first saw the images and you are so correct about what a difference water can make to a usually parched country.


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Stephen
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Reply By: get outmore - Sunday, Jun 26, 2011 at 21:10

Sunday, Jun 26, 2011 at 21:10
this has made me think and ask the question

what is the most amazing abundance of wildlife have you seen?

for me it was the late 70s or maybe 1980

i was a kid at school at the wudinna Area School on the upper eyre Penninsula when 000s of pelicans decended on the town oval and the school oval literally covering all sports feilds in town. over about 3 days they thinned out and dissapeared.

I got told it was the pelicans which had moved to Lake eyre for the 74 filling stopping over for a rest on the way back to the coast as the lake dried out

will never forget that
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Sunday, Jun 26, 2011 at 22:40

Sunday, Jun 26, 2011 at 22:40
Hi Get Outmore

That would have been a very truly amazing sight, that is for sure.

Thanks for sharing that great moment.



Cheers


Stephen
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Reply By: Will 76 Series - Sunday, Jun 26, 2011 at 21:49

Sunday, Jun 26, 2011 at 21:49
Got to say the giant fruit bats at Belligen in Northern NSW is a sight to see on sunset when the fly across the sky in the hundreds!!

Will76
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Sunday, Jun 26, 2011 at 22:42

Sunday, Jun 26, 2011 at 22:42
Hi Will

The giant fruit bats sure are a sight when they take off at night. I can still remember when I first them for the first time in Townsville years ago.



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Stephen
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Reply By: Member - A J- Friday, Jul 01, 2011 at 12:20

Friday, Jul 01, 2011 at 12:20
Stephen - I have been advised that the same thing happened in 2000 and it is related to the yabbies returning to their place of birth. They have been washed down stream by the flood water and are now returning.


A J
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Friday, Jul 01, 2011 at 14:04

Friday, Jul 01, 2011 at 14:04
Hi AJ

Thanks very much nuch for that, and just shows how increadible nature is.


Cheers


Stephen
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Follow Up By: get outmore - Friday, Jul 01, 2011 at 14:05

Friday, Jul 01, 2011 at 14:05
I dont buy it, sure I actually dont know but from what ive seen of yabbies they are adapatable survivors if they got washed down stream they woud just make home where they were

if you chuck a few in a dam they breed up - they dont go in search of their birth place

as I said my theory is its got to do with the flow being oxygen deprived which happens in floods in many places resultng in fish kills

just as fish will gasp at the surface, yabbies will seek more highly oxygenated water either in the shallows or go looking for it

the picture doesnt show if they are actually heading anywhere in particular or just massing in the shallows
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