9350 auto tune

Submitted: Thursday, Jul 21, 2011 at 12:21
ThreadID: 87693 Views:4515 Replies:9 FollowUps:6
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Hi guys. I can buy a reconditioned 9350 auto tune at a good price. can any one who has one of these fitted tell me if they can stand up to severe corrugations like the Anne Beadell,cape york, gunbarrell tracks. I have done these tracks so using them as an example. Pros and cons would be good. If not can you recommend a better one.
Thanks in advance

AL
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Reply By: Member Al (Sunshine Coast) - Thursday, Jul 21, 2011 at 12:50

Thursday, Jul 21, 2011 at 12:50
Hi Al, Knowing the internal components and construction of auto tune HF antennas I could say that they have some fragility, more so than a tapped whip.
However Codan's website says this of the 9450.......

"Rugged design."
"The 9350 antenna is constructed to withstand the severe environmental conditions usually experienced in some of the more remote areas of the world. It meets or exceeds the shock and vibrations requirements for MIL-STD-810."

Read more on their website:Codan.

Cheers
Allan

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AnswerID: 460493

Reply By: Member - Andrew L (QLD) - Thursday, Jul 21, 2011 at 12:50

Thursday, Jul 21, 2011 at 12:50
I have an autotune mounted on my rear wheel carrier arm. Bought it 2nd hand with the NGT.
Has been faultless, several Simpson trips, Canning Stock Route, Tanami, Plenty/Donohue, lotsa bush, even managed to back into a tree in Vic high country and pushed my spare wheel into the autotune which then pushed into rear door, breaking window and distorting door which had to be replaced.

Autotune survived fine.



In my opinion, the worst place for an autotune is on the top bar/loop of a bullbar, now that is where it will get subject to vibrations, being a fair way from the bullbar mounting on the chassis, buzzard strike, trees and traffic.

If you can, mount the autotune so as the tip of the autotune/bottom of aerial is at the height of your vehicle, so that with the aerial removed, the autotune does not become a risk in buildings or increase your headheight.
AnswerID: 460494

Follow Up By: racinrob - Thursday, Jul 21, 2011 at 15:45

Thursday, Jul 21, 2011 at 15:45
My only comment would be don't use the spring on top of the Autotune with the stick aerial as it will cause cracking, just use the whip aerial, very little if any difference in signal strength.
Have run my autotune on the top loop of the bullbar for many years and done all the big treks without any drama.

rr VKE237 Sel 6678
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Follow Up By: olcoolone - Thursday, Jul 21, 2011 at 16:27

Thursday, Jul 21, 2011 at 16:27
SOooooo why does Codan recommend the spring if you say it will cause cracking?

Thought the reason for the spring was to stop cracking.
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FollowupID: 734188

Follow Up By: OREJAP - Thursday, Jul 21, 2011 at 18:46

Thursday, Jul 21, 2011 at 18:46
I have had mine mounted to a plate behind spare wheel which is on the rear door on a cruiser,patrol & two Pajero's without any internal damage. Over 13 yrs & numerous trips which included severe corragations. As a side issue I would not mount it on a bull bar becasue if the object is more that 30mm it will be illegat as obsctructing your forward vision....that's in Victoria but I dare say other states would be the same.
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FollowupID: 734211

Follow Up By: racinrob - Thursday, Jul 21, 2011 at 21:06

Thursday, Jul 21, 2011 at 21:06
olcoolone. Using the rigid stick aerial on the spring eventually causes cracks to the top of the Autotuner or so I've been told by other members of my HF club regardless of what Codan say.


rr VKE237 Sel 6678
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FollowupID: 734225

Follow Up By: olcoolone - Friday, Jul 22, 2011 at 12:53

Friday, Jul 22, 2011 at 12:53
Sure it's not "if you don't use a spring".

I find it hard to believe as Codan is very quick to address issues and the 9350 has been around since 1993, would of thought they would if fixed it by now.

Maybe an urban myth?
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FollowupID: 734290

Follow Up By: Member - Mark E (VIC) - Friday, Jul 22, 2011 at 22:14

Friday, Jul 22, 2011 at 22:14
The thin stainless steel whip will give you similar performance and does not place so much stress on the top of the composite black housing.

If you're really worried about maximising the performance, longer whips can be purchased.

I hardly ever use the big black whip these days.

Cheers,

Mark
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FollowupID: 734354

Reply By: Member - Leigh (Vic) - Thursday, Jul 21, 2011 at 12:52

Thursday, Jul 21, 2011 at 12:52
Did the AB with mine and no problems with the unit. If you use the fibreglass whip make sure you avoid high impact with overhanging trees. I ended up with two halves after I gave it a hammering! Now use a thin stainlesssteel whip about 5' long.
AnswerID: 460495

Reply By: olcoolone - Thursday, Jul 21, 2011 at 13:16

Thursday, Jul 21, 2011 at 13:16
The United Nations, Red Cross and a few other peace keeping mobs us then so they must be OK.... I'm sure they are not driven by price alone.
AnswerID: 460498

Reply By: Member - Fred B (NT) - Thursday, Jul 21, 2011 at 13:54

Thursday, Jul 21, 2011 at 13:54
Image Could Not Be FoundGooday Al,

lots of trips over 4.5 years of WA & NT tracks with no problems. I do use a steel whip though as I have heard of a number of people breaking the fibreglass ones.
regards
Fred B
VKS 737: Mobile/Selcall 1334

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AnswerID: 460499

Reply By: The Landy - Thursday, Jul 21, 2011 at 14:13

Thursday, Jul 21, 2011 at 14:13
They are built to withstand the type of treatment you indicate, rough roads, corrugations etc. We had no problems with ours in 4 years of usage. Although, I recently upgraded to the Codan 3040 autotune which is mounted low on the front bulbar (where a winch would be) and it is an excellent unit...

Good luck with it.
AnswerID: 460503

Reply By: Tim - Thursday, Jul 21, 2011 at 17:08

Thursday, Jul 21, 2011 at 17:08
My work trucks all have these fitted and without being too specific, we replace vehicles because they have been destroyed due to getting a constant battering on the dirt roads and the radio gear gets swapped over to the new vehicle. Good luck breaking one.
Tim
AnswerID: 460524

Reply By: Member - Boobook - Friday, Jul 22, 2011 at 06:09

Friday, Jul 22, 2011 at 06:09
Al, one thing to check is the serial number of the 9350.

The serial number is a letter followed by about 4 numbers. Eg E1234
If the one you are looking at buying is an A series Serial number then you should make sure it has been refurbished. There are some changes that ruggedise it.

If you need it to be checked over Peter at Lara electronics. can go over it and bring it up to a D spec if necessary. I think it is about $300 from memory.
AnswerID: 460564

Reply By: snailbait (Blue mntns) - Saturday, Jul 23, 2011 at 15:49

Saturday, Jul 23, 2011 at 15:49
hi all
There are 2 size of springs one is for the stick aerial and 1 for stainless whip aerial. when i got a new ngt i got two aerials but no springs. have your ngt programmed at Lara electronics vic

Terry
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AnswerID: 460707

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