fuel related repairs

Submitted: Tuesday, Jan 17, 2012 at 21:16
ThreadID: 91278 Views:2120 Replies:6 FollowUps:13
This Thread has been Archived
I was on here about 2 months ago regarding extensive repairs to my Holden Crewman Ute that the repairers put down to dirty fuel. Of course the fuel company denied responsibility. Well guess what, the ute broke down again over the weekend and the prognosis again from the repairer is dirty fuel. I may be female but surely I couldn't be up for new injectors again 2 months down the track even though I changed what brand of fuel (as in company brand) I put into my vehicle??
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Tuesday, Jan 17, 2012 at 21:58

Tuesday, Jan 17, 2012 at 21:58
Ring the company involved, I had a BP diesel problem some years back and they paid for the tqnks to be removed, the cost was luckily only $700, remove tank and clean fuel lines etc.. They rang and followed up to see if everything was ok... very professional.. I always get a receipt with the litres and price on it and keep till the next tank.... Michael
Patrol 4.2TDi 2003

Retired 2016 and now Out and About!

There's time to rest when you're dead,
Get out and do something instead!

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 475244

Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Tuesday, Jan 17, 2012 at 22:01

Tuesday, Jan 17, 2012 at 22:01
I forgot to mention, like every company, they have insurance for this kind of thing, just like a plumber or someone who does work or provide a service to you, fuel stations are no different.. Michael

Patrol 4.2TDi 2003

Retired 2016 and now Out and About!

There's time to rest when you're dead,
Get out and do something instead!

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 750197

Follow Up By: fisho64 - Wednesday, Jan 18, 2012 at 00:39

Wednesday, Jan 18, 2012 at 00:39
yep and their first line of defence is denial. Even if it stops 1 in 10 claims, its only cost them a piece of paper....
0
FollowupID: 750218

Reply By: Ross M - Tuesday, Jan 17, 2012 at 21:58

Tuesday, Jan 17, 2012 at 21:58
It seems the fuel filter had not been changed and therefore caused the original fuel injector fault. Dealer/ service fault.

Whoever repaired the vehicle SHOULD have fitted a new filter before they fitted the new parts which have now failed again.

So it looks like the filter hasn't been changed by anyone for a second time.
I imagine you have paid for these service items.
Ask whoever fitted/repaired the vehicle to show you the list of parts they replaced. If they cannot prove it was changed then you have them on toast and this repair as well as the original should be at the dealers/repairers expense.

From my experience nearly all dealers short change customers and filters is one item rarely changed because who will know and how would the customer prove it wasn't done.

This is why they are called stealerships, they are corrupt, have no morals and will rip off customers wherever they can.
Go get em.

Ross M
AnswerID: 475245

Follow Up By: Yanktigers - Tuesday, Jan 17, 2012 at 22:29

Tuesday, Jan 17, 2012 at 22:29
Ross M is correct about this. I have seen where vehicles have gone for service and the client has been billed but the vehicle has not been touched. If do not get anywhere take the matter up with consumer affairs but make sure you have all your receipts

Garry
0
FollowupID: 750199

Follow Up By: Member - Josh- Tuesday, Jan 17, 2012 at 22:40

Tuesday, Jan 17, 2012 at 22:40
A mate got an invisible pen from the toy shop (the one that shows up under uv light) and wrote on the fuel filter "you're full of ......". When he went to pick up the car he asked was it all done. "Yep all done as asked". He then shone the light on the filter and asked the mechanic to read it. The mechanic had the cheek to say "that's not very nice".
If you think you're being ripped off go get one and try it.

Josh
0
FollowupID: 750200

Follow Up By: Yanktigers - Wednesday, Jan 18, 2012 at 00:44

Wednesday, Jan 18, 2012 at 00:44
Josh I reckon that is excellent. I hope everyone is able to read your thread and do what you have said.

Garry
0
FollowupID: 750219

Follow Up By: Member - Bucky - Wednesday, Jan 18, 2012 at 04:19

Wednesday, Jan 18, 2012 at 04:19
Jason
Love it

Fortunately I trust 100% my mechnics. But if there is ever a doube that is the best way to prove it
Cheers
Bucky
0
FollowupID: 750223

Reply By: Trac71 - Wednesday, Jan 18, 2012 at 07:15

Wednesday, Jan 18, 2012 at 07:15
Thank you so much everyone. I was thinking along the lines of the fuel filter. And the other thing that bothers me, would ALL my injectors need to be replaced?
AnswerID: 475261

Follow Up By: Ross M - Wednesday, Jan 18, 2012 at 09:42

Wednesday, Jan 18, 2012 at 09:42
If it is any consolation Holden dealers are not changing the filters on Colorados at what could only be described as the reverse of an alarming rate.
Most of these cost the customer around $8000 to have it repaired by the dealer who caused it.
If you see a car dealer with a bloodied nose you can guess why.
The lack of servicing in Australia is out of control and people by most accounts do nothing about it when it happens to them. They just blindly trust, no white cane at all, the dealer who is ripping them off.

Ross M
0
FollowupID: 750239

Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Wednesday, Jan 18, 2012 at 17:37

Wednesday, Jan 18, 2012 at 17:37
Ross!! Why are holden dealers not changing filters? Are people being charged for these and not changed?? Or are they not changing them because they dont need the money?? Its a pretty wild statement!!! Michael
Patrol 4.2TDi 2003

Retired 2016 and now Out and About!

There's time to rest when you're dead,
Get out and do something instead!

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 750280

Follow Up By: ross - Sunday, Jan 22, 2012 at 16:41

Sunday, Jan 22, 2012 at 16:41
Trac71,have they told you what the fuel is contaminated with,is it dirt,water ,other petro based chemicals?
If they say its contaminated ,they must have an inkling of what it is.
Im a bit sceptical that this dirty fuel story is used as an excuse to run up big repair bills.
Service stations also have filters on their bowsers as well

As to your question as to whether it would damage all the injectors,thats hard to say.If it could damage one ,its reasonable to assume it could damage more
You have the right to view any components that a mechanic says needs replacing.
A good mechanic would willingly explain why he thinks an injector needs replacing.
0
FollowupID: 750674

Follow Up By: Trac71 - Sunday, Jan 22, 2012 at 19:53

Sunday, Jan 22, 2012 at 19:53
Thanks Ross, it's like dark bits in the fuel (both samples look similar). But we think we've found the cause of my "dirty fuel". They reckon the fuel neck has rust in it (we asked them to check that) so a new neck is on its way. They're keeping the old neck to show us. But I'm up for a new fuel pump again apparently. Fingers crossed though that this solves the mystery. I've warned her though, she plays up one more time, that's it, she's going to be replaced...
0
FollowupID: 750699

Follow Up By: ross - Sunday, Jan 22, 2012 at 23:33

Sunday, Jan 22, 2012 at 23:33
Yes ,I saw your post after I had posted. Rust does look black after being immersed in fuel for some time.
Makes you wonder if the fuel filler can rust,maybe the tank can as well.
Im not sure if holden are using plastic or steel tanks.
0
FollowupID: 750724

Reply By: lindsay - Wednesday, Jan 18, 2012 at 20:16

Wednesday, Jan 18, 2012 at 20:16
I might be dumb, but as the owner of 9 diesel vehicles I thought that when a fuel filier blocked it would reduce the amount of fuel getting to the injectors, not letting crap through. Like an air cleaner the dirtier the filter the less it lets past. Maybe my 45 years with diesels, serviced by myself has led me astray and I really did not not know much about filtration.
AnswerID: 475357

Follow Up By: Ross M - Wednesday, Jan 18, 2012 at 23:36

Wednesday, Jan 18, 2012 at 23:36
Lindsay is correct in saying a filter will filter better when blocked.
The trouble starts when the filter, either petrol or diesel is left there long enough that the filter medium,ie the filter material itself, starts to degrade and lets through lumps of filter, water and dirt.

Donaldson filters site makes mention of filter degradation and to avoid it.
Many makes say 18-24 months is maximum life of a fuel filter actually immersed in fuel.
If the first filter was doing its job then all is well but when the degradation starts then it will cause further problems again and again if not changed.
As the owner of diesels Lindsay will have changed his filters and not got to the point where degradation of the filter medium happened.
The function of a filter is to stop contaminants and will block eventually. This will give symptoms of fuel starvation, not of component failure and component blockage.
This vehicle was driving until it was stopped with blockages of components down stream of the filter. The idea is to change the filter before this happens.
It is highly possible the filter has degraded and all the crap has now gone to the fuel system. It worked well when the filter was doing its job but now there is a repeat performance which theoretically can't happen with a properly functioning filter.
Although its about a petrol engine here. The mention of diesels came into it to highlight the fact that some of them, many makes involved here, can be driving along happily and suddenly destroy their injection pump and injectors. The common item here is NOT changing the filter as necessary to avoid trouble.

Many people who have had their vehicles serviced by dealer/mechanic have had trouble.
I can't recall such failures happening to people who diligently service their own vehicles.
0
FollowupID: 750308

Reply By: Ian B9 - Sunday, Jan 22, 2012 at 07:50

Sunday, Jan 22, 2012 at 07:50
I went through the same scenario, after getting the vehicle back to our workshop we found the pump was wearing and causing the blockage problem, not a dirty fuel problem. There is no filter between the pump and injectors. Changed the pump have not had any problems since.
AnswerID: 475637

Reply By: Trac71 - Sunday, Jan 22, 2012 at 09:35

Sunday, Jan 22, 2012 at 09:35
Thank you everyone. Wow, what a week. Apparently the fuel filter is in the fuel pump and my fuel pump was replaced the last time. But we think we've found the cause of my "dirty fuel". They reckon the fuel neck has rust in it so a new neck is on its way. They're keeping the old neck to show us. But I'm also up for a new fuel pump again apparently. Fingers crossed though that this solves the mystery. I've warned her though, she plays up one more time, that's it, she's going to be replaced...
AnswerID: 475651

Follow Up By: Ross M - Sunday, Jan 22, 2012 at 22:55

Sunday, Jan 22, 2012 at 22:55
Both petrol engines and common rail diesel engines have a fuel filter between the tank pump and the injection system. This is the important one.
Trac71, your system has a strainer in the tank and the fuel is strained though it and enters the pump. This strainer only strains out large bits.
The fuel is then delivered to the real fuel filter so the fuel is cleaned of contaminants before it gets to the injectors.

The filter we are talking about is this filter and it is between the tank pump and the engine injection system. This will be the one which may never have been changed.

On many Commodores the filter in question was situated just outside the tank under the back and not something which a lot of people would bother to change. This is a factor which would add more weight to the argument about the filter not being changed.
If it was changed a short while ago at the last repair then the filter should look brand new, cos it aint long ago. If it doesn't look new then it wasn't changed.

If the filter is any good at filtering it should not be letting through stuff which will cause you trouble.

Ross M
0
FollowupID: 750718

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)