Changing a tyre on an alloy rim ?

Submitted: Friday, Feb 10, 2012 at 16:29
ThreadID: 91788 Views:6615 Replies:8 FollowUps:18
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G'day All

I've changed more tyres than I should have on steel rims but looks like I will now have to change some tyres on alloy rims. I have been using tyrepliers, good long sturdy well rounded tyre levers and the trusty old rubber mallet to good effect and can get the job done reasonably quickly.

What would be your helpful tips to stop me scratching the living daylights out of the alloy rims ? Just getting prepared for an upcoming trip !

Cheers

Gazz
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Reply By: Member - Tezza Qld - Friday, Feb 10, 2012 at 17:12

Friday, Feb 10, 2012 at 17:12
Hi Gazz

When I have to do the deed on alloy's I use a white rubber mallet and I have a length of high pressure black 25mm poly water pipe ,about 300 long , which I split lengthwise with a cutting wheel .
This slips over the rim to avoid damage by the tyre levers


The white mallets are usually available from landscape suppliers as they are used to stop the black marks when laying pavers. Just checked, mine is a Flextool brand, bought from Parchem constructions.

If memory serves me correctly Rema Tip Top also do a rim protector for alloy rims.


Hope this helps

Cheers Teza
AnswerID: 477436

Follow Up By: Member - Outback Gazz - Friday, Feb 10, 2012 at 17:44

Friday, Feb 10, 2012 at 17:44
Thanks Tezza

The poly pipe sounds like a good idea as it would have the "coil shape" built in and would be almost as round as the rim ! I will check out the Rema product and if all else fails will take some poly pipe with me. Any particular reason for the 25 mm over say 19 mm ?

All the best

Gazz

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Follow Up By: Member - Tezza Qld - Friday, Feb 10, 2012 at 19:23

Friday, Feb 10, 2012 at 19:23
No Gazz

19 mm would be good or even better. Just used what I found in the shed


Teza
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FollowupID: 752662

Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Friday, Feb 10, 2012 at 18:41

Friday, Feb 10, 2012 at 18:41
3 ways of avoiding the problem.

#1 Don't change tyres. So get good at using a plug kit - plugs take a bit of practice but in remote areas they are gold.

#2 Don't take a spare casing. Better to have a second spare on a rim, then you'll not be tempted to change a tyre. And alloys are usually about 6kg lighter than steel rims, so less hassle with taking an extra mounted tyre.

#3 If you need to "repair" or "patch" a tyre on an alloy rim, then I suggest you use a wider flat tyre iron that doesn't dig in ( I have one from years ago); and that you repair the tyre with the second bead still on (sometimes the second bead is the most difficult). I've also used the plastic protectors that come with the tyreplier kits and they do help.

Cheers
Phil
AnswerID: 477443

Follow Up By: Member - Outback Gazz - Friday, Feb 10, 2012 at 18:57

Friday, Feb 10, 2012 at 18:57
Thanks Phil

I've been carrying and using a plug kit for quite a few years now and reckon they're great ! I am not predicting that we will get punctures etc but I have to do a tyre changing demo and all the vehicles that are going have alloy rims ! The only alloy I like working with in the bush is the alloy that keeps my favourite liquid refreshment in - and it's a good alloy too - it crushes up easily before putting it in the waste bag. Whilst the vehicles I am taking aren't mine, I will say that I look after my stuff pretty well but try to look after other peoples stuff just that little bit more !

All the best

Gazz



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FollowupID: 752659

Reply By: Outnabout.. - Friday, Feb 10, 2012 at 22:26

Friday, Feb 10, 2012 at 22:26
As others have said you can get rim protectors and they do work.
If you use tyre lubricant when refitting or you know the corret technique for removing te tyre off the rim completeley you will never need a mallett.
Too much chnce of a misfire and a damaged rim or ankle. I changed tyres for years using a rubber mallett then one day 10 years ago someone showed me the easy way.
AnswerID: 477463

Follow Up By: Member - Outback Gazz - Saturday, Feb 11, 2012 at 15:23

Saturday, Feb 11, 2012 at 15:23
G'day Outnabout

I was taught to take the tyre off with levers and put the tyre on with a mallet and have found that with a bit of detergent / water mix applied with a spray bottle it was quite easy with no damage to the rim or ankles !
Any tips with your "easy way" ?

Thanks

Gazz
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FollowupID: 752729

Follow Up By: member - mazcan - Saturday, Feb 11, 2012 at 18:37

Saturday, Feb 11, 2012 at 18:37
hi
when i had a jeep cherokee years ago with alloy rims i had to take a tyre off to get a nail out the tread
i took it off on the inside of the rim and it was easy with levers and soap and no damage to the face side of the rim put it back on the same waybut with a rubber hammerand plenty of soap went on just as easy ex farmer had years of experience on all sizes of tyre from wheel barrows to large tractor and machinery tyres there the killers
cheers
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FollowupID: 752744

Follow Up By: Member - Outback Gazz - Sunday, Feb 12, 2012 at 08:44

Sunday, Feb 12, 2012 at 08:44
Thanks Mazcan

A mate of mine is going to lend me one of his old spare alloy wheels so I might try your suggestion of starting and finishing the change from the inside of the wheel instead of the face side ! I have to do a tyre changing demo on an upcoming trip and if I have a practice run using the "from the inside way" in my backyard before we head off I might look like I know what I'm doing when we are on the trip. None of the cars going are mine and they all have alloy wheels so I was hoping not to scratch the living daylights out of somebody elses alloy rims !

All the best

Gazz

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FollowupID: 752771

Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Sunday, Feb 12, 2012 at 09:25

Sunday, Feb 12, 2012 at 09:25
Gazz,
You're a wise man - always worth having a practice run before you do a demo!

In this case, you'll find it impossible to lever a tyre over the inside of a rim. The sunken "well" which the bead drops into is only on the outside face of the rim. Mazcan may have had a very skinny rim where the well was in the centreline which is unusual. Here's a photo
Image Could Not Be Found
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FollowupID: 752772

Follow Up By: Member - Outback Gazz - Sunday, Feb 12, 2012 at 12:34

Sunday, Feb 12, 2012 at 12:34
Thanks Phil

Never even thought about that - should have known better but - touch wood - it's been quite a while since I've had to do the deed. I might just try the rim protector ideas and stop worrying so much about scratching someone elses wheels.

Cheers

Gazz
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FollowupID: 752794

Follow Up By: member - mazcan - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 12:18

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 12:18
hi phil g
the rim you show has a different profile to the ones i have on my vw and had on the jeep and i agree it would be a difficult and/or imposible but the rims i did had a deeper well the jeep had only 6.5inch width and i have done 4 tryes on my current vw it has 7inch but also has a deeper well and tapered section than the one you have shown
i new after i posted some one would pick me on that and new it would be someone with wider rims lol
no worries not all rims are the same
cheers
ps sorry gazz
that i didnt fully explain
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Follow Up By: Outnabout.. - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 19:24

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 19:24
Outback Gazz,

get some good old fashioned Lux flakes and mix with water. You want a thick paste and I find if you leave it a few days it will go just right. If it dries out just add some water and rub with a small paint brush in a circular motion just lke you would if you are old enough to have used a shaving brush.

Of course you can buy professional tyre lube but usually it only comes in commercial quantities and is expensive. If you have a good relationship with your tyre dealer you may be able to get a little bit in a small container.

Two problems I see people doing is they lubricate the wrong part when putting it on. You are putting it back on so you must lubricate the rim and the underside of the tyre as this is what you have to ease over the rim.

The next problem is that whether you use levers, malletts or hand like me DONT try to take to bigger "bites"

I kneel down or sit the tyre on the table and use my body weight and stiff arms to push down in a side to side motion, Some people may have to stand on the tyre with their heals where the tyre meets the rim and shift the body weight just an inch at a time.

I am a big person however before I moved interstate I used to instruct at my 4WD club how to do this method and had 50 -60 kg woman being able to do this.

I will concede that MudTyres do need a bit more force because of their construction but the average person can chnge HT or AT;s easily with a bit of practice.

Even if you can't get it completly on the last bit can be finished off with a lever but remeber DONT LEVER TO MUCH at a time.

As far as removing the tyre without a mallet it is a bit hard to describe the actual method (maybe I should do a video one day) but once again lubrication of the appropriate contact areas is a major part.

If you are ever in Emeral Qld I would be more than happy to show you.

DAviid

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FollowupID: 753085

Follow Up By: Member - Outback Gazz - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 22:18

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 22:18
Thanks David

I think you're on the money here ! I raced dirt bikes for ten years and learnt that taking smaller bites was the best and easiest way to go seeing that the levers I used were only 6 inches long ! I don't really have time to do a practice run on the alloys now but without doubt I will use your method ! As in my original post I stated that I have changed many tyres on steel rims - nearly all on my own vehicle but I was just worried about scratching some elses rims when they are paying me to take them away in their cars ! I'm in South Oz but a few years ago I worked in Middlemount and quite often went to Emerald for a bit of a holiday so to speak - nice spot !

Thanks for your reply and advice

All the best

Gazz
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FollowupID: 753113

Follow Up By: Member - Outback Gazz - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 22:23

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 22:23
Hey Mazcan

no probs - think I've got it sorted now !

When I get back from my all expenses paid trip from Adelaide to Darwin and return in someone elses car I will let all of you know how I went !


Cheers


Gazz
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FollowupID: 753114

Reply By: Ray - Saturday, Feb 11, 2012 at 09:01

Saturday, Feb 11, 2012 at 09:01
Stick to steel rims
AnswerID: 477474

Reply By: Member - Bucky - Saturday, Feb 11, 2012 at 14:40

Saturday, Feb 11, 2012 at 14:40
Gazz
get a thorn proof tube from a bike shop.

Cut off 3"- 4" at a time, ans us males have the perfect unstrument to measure that !

Put over end of tyre lever, use wisely, and presto, no marks

Cheers Bucky
AnswerID: 477490

Follow Up By: Member - Outback Gazz - Saturday, Feb 11, 2012 at 15:27

Saturday, Feb 11, 2012 at 15:27
G'day Bucky

I will look into that !

Are you bragging Bucky ?

I'm hung like an acorn but as most women know - an acorn stays harder a lot longer than a kranksy !

Cheers

Gazz
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FollowupID: 752730

Follow Up By: Member - Bucky - Sunday, Feb 12, 2012 at 05:32

Sunday, Feb 12, 2012 at 05:32
Gazz
the correct terminoligy is

"hung like a Chihuahua"

hehehehehe

Cheers
Bucky
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Reply By: Peter_n_Margaret - Saturday, Feb 11, 2012 at 15:31

Saturday, Feb 11, 2012 at 15:31
Use tyre slip, and lots of it. The stuff the pros use. It really does work and works better than home made stuff.

Cheers,
Peter
OKA196 Motorhome.
AnswerID: 477495

Reply By: Peter_n_Margaret - Saturday, Feb 11, 2012 at 15:32

Saturday, Feb 11, 2012 at 15:32
Use tyre slip, and lots of it. The stuff the pros use. It really does work and works better than home made stuff.
On any rim.

Cheers,
Peter
OKA196 Motorhome.
AnswerID: 477496

Follow Up By: Member - Outback Gazz - Saturday, Feb 11, 2012 at 15:38

Saturday, Feb 11, 2012 at 15:38
Thanks Peter_n_Margaret

You can call me the mirror man - I'll look into it !

Happy Travelling

Gazz
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FollowupID: 752731

Follow Up By: Member - Tezza Qld - Monday, Feb 13, 2012 at 08:30

Monday, Feb 13, 2012 at 08:30
Gazz

Believe it or not I carry a tube of water based personal lubricant in my tyre kit

Works a treat on tyres, leaves no residue and as a bonus you never get caught short LOL

If you get glow in the dark stuff should be easier repairing tyres at night Ha Ha



Cheers Teza
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FollowupID: 752870

Follow Up By: Member - Outback Gazz - Monday, Feb 13, 2012 at 18:36

Monday, Feb 13, 2012 at 18:36
Hey Teza

I'm not looking forward to changing a tyre on a trip with you and Bucky - after reading Bucky's reply about the 3 to 4 inch male measuring stick and now you're telling me about the "personal lube" stuff you carry, I would have to make sure I don't drop the valve !! I had to get an "extension" ( these puns are getting a bit much now ) for my old tyrepliers as mine only go to 16 inch and the 200 series wheels are 17 inch - then I asked the salesman about "rim protectors" ( here we go again ) and he said that they affect the way the tyrepliers work and said he just wraps a couple of layers of duct tape around the levers when working on alloy rims and hasn't scratched any rims yet, so I will try Bucky's idea of the thorn proof tube first then if I have to I will use duct tape !

Thanks Teza and Bucky
and everyone else who replied with advice


Cheers

Gazz
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FollowupID: 752915

Reply By: Alloy c/t - Saturday, Feb 11, 2012 at 17:51

Saturday, Feb 11, 2012 at 17:51
O'neill Industries R&R Beadbreaker , no mallet /tyre levers required , NO marks/scratches ,no effort required unless you call turning a shifting spanner effort , even the wife has used it after watching the dvd on 'how to' ,,,,
AnswerID: 477508

Follow Up By: The other Norm C (WA) - Thursday, Feb 16, 2012 at 00:30

Thursday, Feb 16, 2012 at 00:30
Bead Breaker will only break the bead and assist in reseating the tyre
You'll still need tyre levers to remove/refit the tyre
Norm
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FollowupID: 753248

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