Snatch straps

Submitted: Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 11:35
ThreadID: 91862 Views:2561 Replies:7 FollowUps:9
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Hi all,
I'm in the market for a new snatch strap and am wondering, why the difference in widths? I can get an 11000kg strap in 60mm, 75mm or 100mm from various suppliers.
What's the difference as they are all rated the same?

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Reply By: Stevo - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 13:02

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 13:02
Different ply thickness.
AnswerID: 477744

Reply By: Wayne (NSW) - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 13:22

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 13:22
John,

They might have the same rating but would have a different amount of stretch and rebound.

A small vehicle recovering another small vehicle might not get the same amount of rebound out of a 100mm strap as say 2 Hummers using the same size. It is all about the weight of the vehicles.

A strap that has a rating of 11000kg regardless of width would be very heavy duty and would not work as well as a 9,000kg strap on your average 4WD. In this case bigger is not always better.

Wayne
AnswerID: 477748

Follow Up By: MrBitchi (QLD) - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 13:24

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 13:24
But they are all rated to the same amount of stretch (approx 22%) ??
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FollowupID: 753023

Reply By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 14:26

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 14:26
Hi John

Like Wayne has stated above, bigger is not the best.

I had to replace my very much used snatch strap a few years ago and was looking at a wider/higher load snatch strap. The first thing that the ARB salesperson asked was what vehicle I was going to use it on. He strongly advised against the 11,000 kg strap and only recommended the 8,000 kg strap. The reason was that in serious conditions there could be a great chance of damage to the chassis of the vehicle, as the higher rated strap was for light trucks, not your average 4X4.

I took their word and settled on the 8,000 kg rated unit and have had no issues. I could be wrong, but what I was told does make sense.


Ask a few 4X4 shops and get their advise and hear what they have to say.



Cheers



Stephen
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AnswerID: 477753

Follow Up By: MrBitchi (QLD) - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 14:29

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 14:29
I understand the pros and cons of an 8000kg versus 11000kg, but what I don't get is why one 8000kg strap is 60mm wide and another 8000kg strap is 100mm wide. Why is one 40mm wider than another? Which is better???
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FollowupID: 753036

Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 14:32

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 14:32
Hi John

Sorry but I could not answer that question. Like I said above, give one of the Major 4X4 stores a call and they would surely have the correct answer.



Cheers


Stephen
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FollowupID: 753038

Reply By: Member - Mark G Gulmarrad - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 19:21

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 19:21
John

expecting a little drama this Easter are we?

hehehehehe.
AnswerID: 477791

Follow Up By: On Patrol & TONI - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 20:51

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 20:51
Mark
is John going out with you at easter, I could see no other reason he would need a strap :)))
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FollowupID: 753098

Follow Up By: Member - Rob Mac (QLD) - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 22:59

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 22:59
My first thoughts exactly Mark, but I have seen how John's wagon goes, especially when going up that steep hill with the big washout.
Cheers see you there
Rob Mac
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FollowupID: 753120

Follow Up By: MrBitchi (QLD) - Wednesday, Feb 15, 2012 at 08:33

Wednesday, Feb 15, 2012 at 08:33
Just making sure the NRU (Nissan Recovery Unit) is fully prepared ;))
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FollowupID: 753133

Follow Up By: Member - Rob Mac (QLD) - Thursday, Feb 16, 2012 at 00:04

Thursday, Feb 16, 2012 at 00:04
Image Could Not Be FoundSomething like this eh John
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FollowupID: 753247

Follow Up By: MrBitchi (QLD) - Thursday, Feb 16, 2012 at 08:42

Thursday, Feb 16, 2012 at 08:42
That's the one, Rob. NRU in action :)
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Reply By: vk1dx - Wednesday, Feb 15, 2012 at 09:22

Wednesday, Feb 15, 2012 at 09:22
Hi John

Different thicknesses but rated the same?

That is a hard one. The only suggestion that I have is that one may be "rated" at a value but may be a "Chinese" imitation. Not everything coming across our shores is inspected. eg "named" brand clothes at the Sunday markets!!!

Safest way is to go to an actual 4WD shop and ask. It may also pay to purchase it there. It may cost a few dollars more, but that's better than buying a "rated" one from the markets or the internet and have it break on you.

Phil
AnswerID: 477824

Reply By: Member - Tony V (NSW) - Wednesday, Feb 15, 2012 at 10:25

Wednesday, Feb 15, 2012 at 10:25
John,

Different manufactures use different nylon and weaves for the straps.

To utilise the kinetic energy associated with the strap to provide a 20% stretch, a different width may be required by the manufacturer.

Some will use a 6mm x 100mm webbing others 8mm x 75mm or 10mm x 60mm webbing for the same tonnage to provide the average 20% stretch.

So if you use the general rule of 2 to 2.5 times the weight of the vehicle for purchasing a strap you will normally end up with a 8 tonne strap for the average Landcruiser - Patrol.

Most Dual cabs a 6000kg strap.
Smaller Suzuki sized vehicles a 4000kg strap.

I have a Landcruiser and would never use a 11000kg strap on my vehicle to be recovered or to recover another vehicle. I don't need the shock load of attempting to stretch an 11 tonne strap on my vehicle. .

Why ? To stretch a 11 tonne strap to get the the full use of kinetic energy (20% stretch) I would need to in a 4.4 tonne vehicle not a 3 tonne one.

Just play with a couple of elastic bands of various strengths to understand the stretch to load difference.

I would always use the strap for the lightest vehicle in being recovered or in recovery if possible. So if i was asked to recover a Suzuki 4WD I would expect the owner to have a 4000kg snatch strap as a 8000kg one will not stretch with the lighter vehicle.
AnswerID: 477830

Follow Up By: MrBitchi (QLD) - Wednesday, Feb 15, 2012 at 10:28

Wednesday, Feb 15, 2012 at 10:28
That's the best answer so far :)

I agree about the 8000kg strap. That's what I carry and what I'll be buying. Just couldn't figure out the different widths.
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FollowupID: 753142

Reply By: Rob! - Thursday, Feb 16, 2012 at 14:36

Thursday, Feb 16, 2012 at 14:36
The question that should firstly be asked is what does the "rating" mean. Does the 8 000lb strap rating mean that that is the maximum force the strap can hold or is it the force required to stretch it to 22%?
AnswerID: 477919

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