Air Tank Capacity

Submitted: Saturday, Mar 03, 2012 at 20:04
ThreadID: 92273 Views:3034 Replies:6 FollowUps:11
This Thread has been Archived
Hi all! I have searched the archives (before I decided to bother you all) and have not really come up with a definitive answer for my question:

What is an adequate size air tank to incorporate into my system? I am rebuilding/building a 1992 N/A HZJ 75 series ute, and the system is/will be utilised for airing up, F&R lockers, filter blow out. No rattle gun (I have a longbar for that and detest rattle guns).

I have been looking on ebay and seen the Tigerz11 9 and 18 litre air tanks and whilst the 18L will fit where I want to mount it, the 9L will be more suitable if it will fit the bill.

This will be my first time mounting a tank into the system and whilst I understand the basics eg more volume and more pressure = more air, I'd like to hear from other people's experience from what they have seen, used and learnt.

The old girl is getting a full rebuild prior to May 2013 - CSR Time for me (Solo - and before you all crucify me, wait until I post some pics of what will be a custom rig, my blog and plan closer to the date) so I will appreciate any and all advice relating to the air tank

Regards

Matt
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Member Andys Adventures - Saturday, Mar 03, 2012 at 20:29

Saturday, Mar 03, 2012 at 20:29
Image Could Not Be FoundHi Matt, I use a 9 lt aluminium air tank and have a switch that turns on the air compressor when the presser goes below 90 psi and cuts out at 110 psi. Just make shore that you can get to the drain plug when you mount it. It will do the job. Got mine on Ebay too.
Andy
AnswerID: 479329

Follow Up By: Member - Matt@Outback - Saturday, Mar 03, 2012 at 20:57

Saturday, Mar 03, 2012 at 20:57
Thanks Andy! I have done a fair bit of "research" (read: time spent on the computer whilst the missus is in a feral because I'm spending too much time on the ute) and in addition to what was supplied with the two ARB lockers, I have the extra relief valve, t pieces, regulators etc.

I noticed on both the 9 and 18L tanks from tigerz11 that they both had 5 ports, positioned in various spots on the tanks - you're very right as I want to mount the tank on a vertical surface using the stand legs welded on the tank. By the look of both of the tanks there will be a port for a drain plug whein I do this.

Thanks for your reply

Matt
0
FollowupID: 754772

Follow Up By: Member - Matt@Outback - Saturday, Mar 03, 2012 at 20:58

Saturday, Mar 03, 2012 at 20:58
P.S. thanks for the pic too - seeing how others have done it is always good for ideas and general knowledge
0
FollowupID: 754773

Follow Up By: Member - Rocker (NSW) - Saturday, Mar 03, 2012 at 23:15

Saturday, Mar 03, 2012 at 23:15
Hi Matt
I guess it comes down to how patient you are. Personally I'd go the 18 if you can fit it. I run one x 15 ltr with a pressure switch operating at 140 on & 175 off. Coming off the beach at 12 psi, I get 2 x 285/75 16 back up to 38 psi reasonbly quick but then wait for pressure to come back up before innflating the other 2. I have room under the tray therefore I'm going to fit a second 15 ltr tank which should suit my application just nice.
0
FollowupID: 754794

Follow Up By: Member - Matt@Outback - Sunday, Mar 04, 2012 at 12:04

Sunday, Mar 04, 2012 at 12:04
Thanks Scott!!
0
FollowupID: 754865

Reply By: Member - Bucky - Sunday, Mar 04, 2012 at 06:40

Sunday, Mar 04, 2012 at 06:40
Matt
Can't wait to see your rig pice
Canning can be done solo, it's not a hard track to do, and we seen plenty of solo travellers, in 2009.
Low tyre pressures and a reliable vehicle is all you need.
Just do your homework, carry plenty of spares, because if you do, nothing will go wrong. things fall of, like light assemblies, so small self tapping screws are a necessary item. FUSES
Superglue Jell, and some of that Steel putty, and 5 minute Araldite, come in handy at times too.

Cheers
Bucky


AnswerID: 479355

Follow Up By: Member - Matt@Outback - Sunday, Mar 04, 2012 at 12:17

Sunday, Mar 04, 2012 at 12:17
Thanks Bucky!

Good to hear that others do it solo as when I have posted my intent on other sites I get shot down for being a cowboy - pretty harsh considering I was in a recon unit in the Army for 8 years and I have a fair to reasonable idea of what I'm doing...

I'm rewiring the whole vehicle basically - moving the fuse box to the glove box - and hope that will help prevent electrical faults by inspecting the wiring thru that process as well as re-routing to make it more protected and secure.

Thanks for the advice on what to take - always glad to hear from others who have completed the CSR (and even those who had to turn back) - learning from others is always good.

Time Spent in Recon is Seldom Wasted

Matt
0
FollowupID: 754868

Follow Up By: Member - Matt@Outback - Sunday, Mar 04, 2012 at 12:18

Sunday, Mar 04, 2012 at 12:18
P.S. -Awesome profile pic!!!!!!
0
FollowupID: 754869

Follow Up By: Crackles - Monday, Mar 05, 2012 at 18:48

Monday, Mar 05, 2012 at 18:48
"Canning ...... it's not a hard track to do"
Well I suppose one could say it's not a hard track to do solo if you're naive & lucky or on the other hand experienced & well prepared. (But I doubt many experienced travellers would actually say that ;-)
Cheers Craig.............
===========================================
ExploreOz rating: Five Stars
Extremely remote with regular use of high and low range 4WD, not suitable for caravans and difficult for trailers (check for specific recommendations). Must be totally self-sufficient with all supplies, equipment, spares and at least one in your party should carry emergency communications such as HF radio, or a satellite phone. Beware of extremes of weather and unpredictable track conditions. These treks are the final frontiers of Australia's offroad environment.
0
FollowupID: 755022

Follow Up By: Member - Bucky - Wednesday, Mar 07, 2012 at 06:14

Wednesday, Mar 07, 2012 at 06:14
Crackles

Listen to the knockers, Never !
Naive and lucky, No !
Experienced desert travellers, YES
In a hurry, NO !
Keep 1/2 to 3/4 wheel width out of the wheel ruts, and there is no "porposing"
Take a camper trailer, we did.
All up weight 4.7 tonnes, spread over 6 wheels.
Tyre Pressures 12-15-12psi front to rear ( hot )
Drove firm at times, but never hard. Yes !
Be prepared to drive around, and look out for stakes, that can ruin any tyre, yes !

Punctures on the CSR .....NIL

Do your homework, PREPARE YOUR VEHICLE, CARRY PLENTY OF SPARES, and the CSR it is not hard, but there will be collateral damage, as it is a bit rough in places.

You can get up any dune at 1500-2000rpm, depending on your motor, and/or your turbo settings.

There is no need to use any of the "run-ups", even when towing, with the right tyre pressures,

Just waddle along, and never thrash anything

Rarely did we have to get angry to get over dunes, and on the 3 occasioons we had to have a second go, it was due to my complacency, and not difficult.

Just backed down, added another 10 meters or so, and just went up dunes with just a little more mementum, and never speed.
That includes travelling back down the CSR in mid September, when the temperatures were in the mid 40's, going up on the Nth side, in the heat of the day.

I really do know what I am talking about
Cheers
Bucky



0
FollowupID: 755161

Follow Up By: Crackles - Wednesday, Mar 07, 2012 at 18:03

Wednesday, Mar 07, 2012 at 18:03
I suppose the point I'm trying to make is an experienced traveller possibly shouldn't be suggesting to others on a public forum how easy it was just because they had few problems themselves. The difficulty with the Canning can be the changing conditions & of course the remoteness. Even small issues there can have serious consequences. That's why ExOz have given the Canning the repect it's due by nominating a 5 star (Most difficult) rating on Trek notes.
I've only done the Canning twice but on those trips it was interesting to see the difference with track conditions. 1st time we struggeled over the dunes using much of the run ups, the next time we could have done most of it in two wheel drive if we'd wanted to. 2nd run it rained. Bog holes, soft clay pans, the Savory Creek was running at 750 deep & there were sheets of water on the Northern sections. From memory one fella that season winched for several days on what you're saying is "not a hard track to do". I guess it's all relative.
"Just do your homework, carry plenty of spares, because if you do, nothing will go wrong" ......Sorry but that's a naive statement if I've ever read one ;-)
Cheers Craig...............
0
FollowupID: 755200

Follow Up By: Member - Bucky - Thursday, Mar 08, 2012 at 03:41

Thursday, Mar 08, 2012 at 03:41
Murphy's law prevails.

0
FollowupID: 755283

Reply By: Robin Miller - Monday, Mar 05, 2012 at 13:05

Monday, Mar 05, 2012 at 13:05
Don't even bother Matt

We and most friends use the spare tyre air tank method , 60- 80 litres usually
and we carry a seperate hose for it.

The above gives 2 fully independant setups so we have redundancy when on really out of way places.

As the spare wheel is the same size as the others then you can work out your
blow up capacity directly.

I.E. If you have 80psi in spare then you can put 10 psi directly into 4 others tyres and you know you have 4 X 10 = 40 80- 40=40 left.

You can also steal air from other cars tyres easily.

Robin Miller

Member
My Profile  Send Message

AnswerID: 479524

Reply By: Crackles - Monday, Mar 05, 2012 at 18:28

Monday, Mar 05, 2012 at 18:28
Firstly Matt what size compressor you have as if it's of a reasonable capacity you wouldn't require a tank for the needs you mentioned above anyway? (smaller the compressor the bigger the tank)
Rather than add unnecesary weight the simplist solution that works just as well is to tap an airline into one of the tube bars. A side step for example would give about 5Litres (more than enough to blow dust from an air cleaner). To reseat a bead I've had success with a 9L tank (old water fire extinguisher) although rather than spend money setting that up it would be better directed towards a larger compressor.
Cheers Craig............
AnswerID: 479559

Reply By: Member - Bucky - Wednesday, Mar 07, 2012 at 06:34

Wednesday, Mar 07, 2012 at 06:34
Matt

My young fella was in Recon for 5 years
1RAR in Townsville
known as CHAD !
ever bump into him ?

Cheers
Bucky
AnswerID: 479716

Follow Up By: Member - Matt@Outback - Wednesday, Mar 07, 2012 at 14:11

Wednesday, Mar 07, 2012 at 14:11
1995-2003 (So I've been out now longer than I was in) didn't bump into a Chad, however I wasn't RAInf/posted to a battalion. I was detached to Townsville based units a few times over the years but never got to spend much time in the place itself.
Good to hear from others serving in the machine though, and whilst I loved my time in, I go by the following motto now - it was good while I was in; but it's great that I'm out.
0
FollowupID: 755187

Reply By: Member - Matt@Outback - Wednesday, Mar 07, 2012 at 14:12

Wednesday, Mar 07, 2012 at 14:12
Thanks for all the replies!!

All good advice, and great to see other's preferences and experiences.

Thank you for taking the time out to consider and reply to my question


Matt
AnswerID: 479750

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)