Pump selection for water colection

Submitted: Monday, Mar 05, 2012 at 11:12
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G'day guys,

I'm looking for a pump solution. We have always carted water in buckets when camping but the last couple of trips I've been spoilt by pumping into a water bladder which is just so much easier. I'm having some mods done to our vehicle and am looking for a 12v pump to be installed to suck out of creeks etc. I am looking for a unit that has the maximum reach and hight in keeping with my not wishing to cart with buckets.

The best solution this far is Flojet 4405-143 which permits 2m on the vertical and 10 meters away. Does anyone use a better solution?

Kind regards

Theo
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Reply By: Member - John S (SA) - Monday, Mar 05, 2012 at 11:54

Monday, Mar 05, 2012 at 11:54
http://caravansplus.com.au/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=5598

best pumps on the market have used these for years and never had one fail

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Follow Up By: Member - Rob D (NSW) - Monday, Mar 05, 2012 at 18:07

Monday, Mar 05, 2012 at 18:07
Hi John,

I have a whale submersible pump for my 12V shower and agree that it is very reliable and a great pump.

I looked up the specification of this whale GP1392 pump. It produces a maximum pressure of 19.9psi whereas the other two pumps suggested produce 35psi (Theo) and 50psi (Stan) respectively.

This means that it would not pump over the same vertical height as the other two. 13 metres compared with 20 and 30 metres respectively.

If you relax at a faster pace you can get more relaxation in for a given time.
Regards Rob

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Reply By: Member -Pinko (NSW) - Monday, Mar 05, 2012 at 12:37

Monday, Mar 05, 2012 at 12:37
If you have a 240v. gennie you might look at a submersable or a 12v. submersable if the body of water you are pumping from is large enough to accomodate the pump.
If you are using hoses to and from the pump then a shurflo triple diaphram 12v. is the go.50psi and what goes into the has to come outStan
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Reply By: Member - Rob D (NSW) - Monday, Mar 05, 2012 at 17:55

Monday, Mar 05, 2012 at 17:55
Hi Theo,

I looked up the specification of the Flojet 4405-143 which states that the maximum output pressure is 35psi and that it self-primes up to 2.4m vertical lift.

35psi (approximately 2 times atmospheric pressure) corresponds to a vertical column of water approximately 20 metres high (using the approximation of 1 atmosphere equals 10 metres of water column).

This means that the pump in question needs to be no higher than 2.4 metres above the water you are pumping from. Further the total vertical height of the hose should be no more than 20 metres above the water you are pumping from, this includes the 2.4 metres to the pump.

You may want to put a filter on the inlet as I have had my pump clogged by sand and pieces of vegetation when I had no option but to pump from a shallow creek.

The 50psi pump recommended by Stan Pinko will pump up about an extra 10 metres in height.

If you relax at a faster pace you can get more relaxation in for a given time.
Regards Rob

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Follow Up By: Member - bungarra (WA) - Monday, Mar 05, 2012 at 18:07

Monday, Mar 05, 2012 at 18:07
Rob

To clarify your post a little clearer. ( I havent looked up the performance charts) but using your figures and post above......

it may infer that the pump in question is performing well at a total head of 20m (suction and delivery head) when in actual fact at a total of 20 m head the water may be barely dribbling out the end as at those heads the pump as at the end of its designed range

in other words it will have run out of pressure and delivery at those maximum delivery heads. 35psi delivery at whatever flow rate is specified... ( at the pump discharge outlet) ..and a significant less delivery rate at the other end of the spectrum.....low pressure and a dribble..

cheers



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Follow Up By: Member - Rob D (NSW) - Monday, Mar 05, 2012 at 18:27

Monday, Mar 05, 2012 at 18:27
You are correct; at the maximum height the water will just be dribbling out. The entire pressure generated by the pump is just supporting the height of the water column.

So this means that if you want water flowing at a respectable rate then you will need to be pumping at a much lower level than the maximum water head.

If you relax at a faster pace you can get more relaxation in for a given time.
Regards Rob

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Reply By: Ray - Monday, Mar 05, 2012 at 18:07

Monday, Mar 05, 2012 at 18:07
Don't buy those submersible pumps, the red & white ones from camping stores as they are not truly submersible and you get an ingress of water after a time.
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Follow Up By: Member - Wide ranger - Tuesday, Mar 06, 2012 at 20:13

Tuesday, Mar 06, 2012 at 20:13
Guys ,
If you think you are going to have to lift water that high then,
you may want to have two of the same pumps on a reley system .
First pump lifts into a drum or busket at a flow rate you are happy with
and from there the second pump lifts to where you want the water .
only draw back is when the first cannot keep up with the suction on the second , either reset the limit of the first or thtottle output of the second with a valve so that the flows match .
I also find this good when lifting to my water heater and the second is lifting the hot water , throttle the one to match the heat input and flow rate ,
hope this makes sense .
Cheers
Mark

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Reply By: Member - Beatit (QLD) - Monday, Mar 05, 2012 at 20:39

Monday, Mar 05, 2012 at 20:39
Thanks guys, to coin a phrase it looks like a suck it and see! I was having a robust discussion (fight) with the bride on the various hights we have encountered. we never agree on much hahaha. one trip we bucketted from Crystal Ck on the way to Verilia Point, I felt it was under 2 meters from the log bridge and she said it was more.

Domestically I know I'm wrong.

Kind regards

Theo
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Reply By: Member - Lloyd M - Tuesday, Mar 06, 2012 at 07:14

Tuesday, Mar 06, 2012 at 07:14
I've bought a little Honda 4 stroke 1" pump, it takes up little room in storage, uses almost no fuel, is very light and both the quantity of water and the lifting head are no problems.

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Reply By: rooster350 - Tuesday, Mar 06, 2012 at 10:01

Tuesday, Mar 06, 2012 at 10:01
We have a small 12v Flojet type pump, it is in a wooden box with a 40ah deep cycle battery , a 400mah solar panel sits on top of the box at a 45 degree angle and pointing north. 10m of air hose from from water to pump and 20M of air hose from pump to tap at camp site...lifts water up to about 2m or so o.k , fills a 9l bucket in about 1.5 minutes....we set it up and forget it , battery never goes flat.
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