Question: What desert bush is this?

Hi there,

Here's some picture of the thinly stemmed bushes I saw the other week in the Great Victoria Desert.

Can anyone identify them?

Image Could Not Be Found

Image Could Not Be Found

Cheers if you can.

Alan

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Reply By: ricochet - Sunday, Mar 11, 2012 at 17:56

Sunday, Mar 11, 2012 at 17:56
looks like native poplar, they are a disturbance specialist and the area looks recently burned. short lived, only a few years.
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Follow Up By: Member - Paul B (WA) - Sunday, Mar 11, 2012 at 18:11

Sunday, Mar 11, 2012 at 18:11
Yep, native poplar alright - first things to grow after a fire and grow straight up with an almost pink stem to about 5 or 6 m before branching out like a poplar tree but they don't seem to live all that long - 5 or 10 years at most I would think.
Paul B Kalgoorlie

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Follow Up By: equinox - Sunday, Mar 11, 2012 at 23:23

Sunday, Mar 11, 2012 at 23:23
Thanks guys, looks like I have my answer.

Cheers
Alan

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Follow Up By: get outmore - Monday, Mar 12, 2012 at 01:06

Monday, Mar 12, 2012 at 01:06
OK didnt know thier name but they spring up like a weed after burning in the yellow sand plain country (an example is where the truckies were burnt near yellowdine)

not a desert dweller as such very common in the goldfields in burnt yellow sandpalin
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Reply By: The Explorer - Sunday, Mar 11, 2012 at 19:29

Sunday, Mar 11, 2012 at 19:29
Hi

They (Codonocarpus cotinifolius / Native Poplar) rate a mention here

Trees and Shrubs in the Wiluna region

Cheers
Greg
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Follow Up By: whisky_mac - Monday, Mar 12, 2012 at 14:15

Monday, Mar 12, 2012 at 14:15
With your scientific name I was able to find them in "A Guide to Plants of Inland Australia". They give the name as Desert Poplar with alternate names of Native Poplar, Bellfruit Tree, Bell Fruit. They describe it as a shrub or tree to 8m high with smooth pale bark. The picture shown is of a mature tree and there is no mention of the pinky colour at an early age but they do suggest it occurs after fire and is short lived. They also mention the name Mustard Bush because of the sharp mustard taste of the leaves.

Trees of Victoria and Adjoining Areas lists it as Bell-fruit Tree, Native Poplar and does describe the bark as smooth and pinkish. Regenerates especially after fire.

Cheers
Jim
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