dogs

Hi all, i'm going to be doing a lap around the country starting in late August. I'm going on my own, with no time limit. I'm considering taking a dog with me but would like advice from people who have done the trip with a dog. Does it restrict you from visiting many places? Do most campsites or caravan parks allow dogs?
Any advice or information would be appreciated
Cheers.
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Reply By: The Explorer - Tuesday, Mar 13, 2012 at 18:52

Tuesday, Mar 13, 2012 at 18:52
Hi

A forum search will reveal lots of advice - Dogs - Forum search

Cheers
Greg
I sent one final shout after him to stick to the track, to which he replied “All right,” That was the last ever seen of Gibson - E Giles 23 April 1874

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Reply By: Motherhen - Tuesday, Mar 13, 2012 at 18:55

Tuesday, Mar 13, 2012 at 18:55
Hi Jamdan

Dogs are not permitted in National or Nature Parks, and caravan parks vary. Most free camps such as roadside rest areas have no restrictions. Publications such as Camps Australia Wide mark pet friendly places, and on line caravan park resource Badger's also shows this where known (reports come from contributors who may not always notice unless they have a dog).Gary Stratton's Caravan Park listing has an emphasis on dog friendly caravan parks. Many travellers have dogs, and kennels or sharing dog sittig dutieswith others in camp grounds can be considered so you can visit some key National Parks.

We choose to leave our dog at home, but this is possible and the best for her as she is a farm dog. We also like getting out into National and Nature Parks.

Motherhen
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Follow Up By: jamdan - Tuesday, Mar 13, 2012 at 19:13

Tuesday, Mar 13, 2012 at 19:13
Cheers for that. I intend to visit lots of National/Nature Parks, so maybe best not to take the dog..
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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Tuesday, Mar 13, 2012 at 19:31

Tuesday, Mar 13, 2012 at 19:31
If your dog has other options, i would support that decision.

Mh
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Follow Up By: disco driver - Tuesday, Mar 13, 2012 at 19:58

Tuesday, Mar 13, 2012 at 19:58
Without trying to be too alarmist, be aware that in WA at least, most pastoral, agricultural and crown lands are frequently poisoned with 1080 for wild dog, fox and feral cat control.

There is NO antidote for 1080 and it's inevitably fatal for your pets.

You can limit the risk by always having a muzzle on your dog at all times except when feeding, a leash at all times but no matter what you do,short of giving your pet a holiday away from you(petsitters, kennels, other family or friends) there is always that risk that it will pick up a bait.

Watching your beloved pet die from poison is very traumatic.

Disco.
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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Tuesday, Mar 13, 2012 at 20:37

Tuesday, Mar 13, 2012 at 20:37
A good warning and advice re the muzzle for those travelling with their dogs Disco. Are there no baiting programmes in other states as well? I thought there were.

Mh
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Follow Up By: disco driver - Wednesday, Mar 14, 2012 at 01:06

Wednesday, Mar 14, 2012 at 01:06
Hi Motherhen,
I know of 1080 being used in other states but compared to WA it's use is fairly limited.
There are a number of reasons for this, the main one being that many native animals in WA have built up increased tolerance to 1080 through exposure over many generations to the Oxylobium and Gastrolobium species (Native Pea type plants)) which are mainly in WA only, hence very limited collateral damage to kangaroos,emu's and the little carnivorous marsupials.

The design and size of the meatbaits is such that the small marsupial carnivores cannot ingest sufficient poison to affect them so they remain unharmed.

There is a lot of research that goes into the preparation of Poison Baits, it's much more than just whacking some 1080 onto a lump of meat and chucking it out on the ground somewhere. I expect that as a WA farmer you are familiar with the procedures involved with rabbit control too

Disco.
(who was involved with a Govt agency controlling animal pests in the WA wheatbelt for a good number of years : now retired)
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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Wednesday, Mar 14, 2012 at 01:20

Wednesday, Mar 14, 2012 at 01:20
Hi Disco

No involvement with baiting rabbits, but as a farmer and native wildlife enthusiast i have a good knowledge wild dog baiting and the need for it. The controls on how where and when we can use baits now are extreme, and the person setting the baits has to be a trained operator. It is of course different to DEC land where i understand aerial baiting still takes place. My husband worked in wheatbelt towns, where offices were shared with staff such as you.

Mh
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Reply By: Wayne's 60 - Wednesday, Mar 14, 2012 at 03:48

Wednesday, Mar 14, 2012 at 03:48
Hi jamdan,

There was a similar question posed a while ago that we replied to.

Without really saying that we were smacked down by a plant grower in the US.

We were smacked down by a plant grower in the US, who was very pointed in their opinion that "responsible dog owners" can take their dogs ANYHERE!

Further to that, we were (and our club) labled as dog "Haters" by the same person.

As an example;

There are NO dogs allowed into the Nambung (Pinnacles) National Park.

There are signs stating that "No Dogs Are Allowed"

"Do not enter if you have a dog in your vehicle",

"Turn around and leave now"

One of our club members was a little taken back when a small dog person left their vehicle to have a wee moment on our club member's wheel.

The Ranger was aware of the incident and looking for the people involved.

Further to this, we have not witnessed an actual poisoning, though we do understand from other people that the poisoning of the animal is extremely distressing!!

As others have indicated, please leave the dog with other people, or at home, as it will limit the places you can legally access.


Regards,
Wayne & Sally.
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Reply By: Member - John and Lynne - Wednesday, Mar 14, 2012 at 13:09

Wednesday, Mar 14, 2012 at 13:09
We travel with our Jack Russell and we enjoy her company, the walks and the people we meet through her. However travelling with a dog does mean you have to take good care of the animal, especially in areas which may be baited (a leash and a muzzle) or have paralysis ticks. You need to keep the dog with you eg you can't just go out all day and leave a dog unattended and tied up! Also you need to stop driving to give the dog a break but this is good for you too. We find that she starts "Are we there yet?" if the day gets too long but then we don't like continuous long days of driving either! We certainly don't want a car sick dog!
However we have found that there are often kennels or vets or others who offer puppy day care or boarding close to major parks and other attractions eg at the Pinnacles the ranger station had (free) kennels where we could leave her safely for a few hours. At Katherine in the NT the local vet offered day care at a very reasonable rate. In Darwin (a very dog unfriendly town, as well as Kakadu NP), our dog spent a week in an excellent kennel recommended by a local vet. In the end it comes down to how much you enjoy your dog's company and whether or not you want to stay mostly in National Parks. We have never had difficulty finding good places to camp or appropriate caravan parks and campgrouns but sometimes we have had to look around. Lynne
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Reply By: myaussieadventure - Thursday, Mar 15, 2012 at 00:14

Thursday, Mar 15, 2012 at 00:14
Hi,
The 3 of us (my hubby, our ridgeback and me) have been on the road for about 14months now.
Having our dog was the best decision for us. I couldn't bare the thought of giving her away.
It has been so great having her as a companion, a conversation starter with so many people and a bit of security.
We have had to avoid staying in national parks but we haven't missed anything we wanted to see (we either leave her at the campsite or in the car if it's a quick stop)
Having a dog with you just means you need to plan where ur going to camp.
We do have problems around capital cities.

We are in our late 20's and we've said when we're older and do the trip again, we will prob do it without a dog so we can visit places we've missed but I haven't regretted for a second having her on this trip.

Check out where we've been/ camped etc on our website: www.myaussieadventure.com

Such an amazing country out here :)
You'll love it either way!
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