Lower Trailing Arms

Submitted: Thursday, Mar 15, 2012 at 18:40
ThreadID: 92528 Views:1437 Replies:2 FollowUps:5
This Thread has been Archived
In Aug we are off on a big trip where at times we will be carrying heavy loads in fuel, water, food etc. I've read that the Nissan Patrol (GQ) has a reputation of bending the factory lower trailing arms when fully loaded. "Superior Engineering" have aftermarket and much stronger ones.

Is this something that anyone else has done and why? Is it something I can do at home or is there alignment issues that need to be resolved afterwards?

Thanks,

Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Ozhumvee - Thursday, Mar 15, 2012 at 19:29

Thursday, Mar 15, 2012 at 19:29
Yes they are a problem, I've welded two up over the years on other peoples vehicles.
The cheaper option would be to get a welder to beef them up by welding a piece of angle to the bottom side of them along the full length. Put the existing tube in the V of the angle and pay special attention to either end. We've used star stakes on the road.
The biggest problem is they are relatively thin wall tube and bend easily if they hit anything.
The ones I've welded have both torn away from the bush eye at the end, one was the axle end and one at the chassis end. Good idea to beef them up as it makes a mess when the wheel goes back into the rear guard when driving along.
Peter
1996 Oka Motorhome

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 480444

Follow Up By: Member - Chris & Debbie (QLD) - Thursday, Mar 15, 2012 at 21:38

Thursday, Mar 15, 2012 at 21:38
Just wondering, wouldn't this only be a problem if you managed to hit something, say while offroading, but not just from carrying a heavy load? or can they fail with just a heavy load with normal driving?
Chris
AussieHF touring club. 1089
-------------------------------------------

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 755911

Follow Up By: Lex M - Thursday, Mar 15, 2012 at 22:32

Thursday, Mar 15, 2012 at 22:32
Don't know about elsewhere, but in this state (Qld) welding a suspension component renders it unroadworthy.

Cheers
Lex M
0
FollowupID: 755914

Follow Up By: Gossy - Friday, Mar 16, 2012 at 08:43

Friday, Mar 16, 2012 at 08:43
The 'heavy load' was mentioned in a magazine article; not just hitting objects. It's not an expensive fix to put on aftermarket stuff to fix this so I'll go ahead with it. Now I can justify the fix to the handbrake :)
0
FollowupID: 755944

Follow Up By: Gossy - Friday, Mar 16, 2012 at 08:46

Friday, Mar 16, 2012 at 08:46
Ozhumvee, where did you get your car? Looks great!
0
FollowupID: 755945

Follow Up By: Ozhumvee - Friday, Mar 16, 2012 at 08:56

Friday, Mar 16, 2012 at 08:56
I've seen plenty of "reinforced" bars on GQ's over the years, once such work is done then there is no more problem but can understand the need for replacement ones rather than beefing up the originals.
The Humvee came to Oz nearly ten years ago from Saudi Arabia after Desert Storm. Ex USAF M1026 (same as the ones in Blackhawk down).
I did the RHD conversion and all the work to get it ADR compliant for rego, we've since travelled a couple of hundred thousand k's all over Oz on most of the iconic outback treks, it excells in the sand and has proven to be very reliable and pretty much bulletproof. Even Mick O got to tow it out of a bog due to driver error, you shouldn't go into a stretch of mud and water without locking the centre diff in a constant 4wd ;-))
Peter
1996 Oka Motorhome

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 755947

Reply By: Gossy - Friday, Mar 16, 2012 at 08:44

Friday, Mar 16, 2012 at 08:44
does anyone know if this is a home fix or is there alignment issues etc that need experts to get it done right?
AnswerID: 480502

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)