Deep cycle battery

Submitted: Tuesday, Mar 27, 2012 at 09:43
ThreadID: 92810 Views:1688 Replies:3 FollowUps:6
This Thread has been Archived
The deep cycle battery I have in my carry me camper has died
the battery fitted is An Exide 12V105 AH industrial deep Cycle
I am happy to replace with the same but does any one have another suggestion
I need to stay with same physical size as the one fitted
I don't have any more room for any thing larger
This one battery lasted for 3.5 years

Thanks for any info
Mark (Geelong)

Member
My Profile  Send Message

Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Mark (Geelong) - Tuesday, Mar 27, 2012 at 09:44

Tuesday, Mar 27, 2012 at 09:44
Looks like I hit submit twice
Mark (Geelong)

Member
My Profile  Send Message

AnswerID: 481508

Follow Up By: Member - Mark (Tamworth NSW) - Tuesday, Mar 27, 2012 at 10:24

Tuesday, Mar 27, 2012 at 10:24
I saw someone once write that most batteries don't die, .......instead they are killed by the owner/operator.

Yep I've been guilty with batteries I've used as auxillary power supply.
3/12 years doesn't seem long, could you have been one of the battery murderers?
0
FollowupID: 756869

Follow Up By: Neil & Pauline - Tuesday, Mar 27, 2012 at 10:32

Tuesday, Mar 27, 2012 at 10:32
My view is all batteries will die at some point. Depends how hard you flog them as to how quickly they are killed.

Neil
0
FollowupID: 756870

Reply By: Battery Value Pty Ltd - Tuesday, Mar 27, 2012 at 10:43

Tuesday, Mar 27, 2012 at 10:43
Hi Mark,

here are a few facts for you:

flooded (wet) type batteries in the 12V 'mono bloc' configuration aren't really deep cycle capable.

If your old flooded battery was subject to frequent cycling (discharging below 20~30% depth of discharge), then 3.5 years isn't too bad really.

But for significantly better life expectancy under the same conditions, you want gel, or better yet AGM technology.
The only time one of these may be outlived by a flooded design is under high operating temperature conditions like under the bonnet which is a moot point in your case.

I also recommend to look at the charging side of things, when it comes to replacing the battery.

Expect to pay about $2 per Ah, for a good quality AGM battery.

More information can be found in our profile.

cheers, Peter
AnswerID: 481514

Follow Up By: Dennis Ellery - Tuesday, Mar 27, 2012 at 22:51

Tuesday, Mar 27, 2012 at 22:51
Gee Peter that’s stretching the truth
There are a lot of high quality deep cycle batteries of the wet flooded cell type.
0
FollowupID: 756911

Follow Up By: Battery Value Pty Ltd - Wednesday, Mar 28, 2012 at 08:57

Wednesday, Mar 28, 2012 at 08:57
Hi Dennis,

fact is that if you want decent cycle life from a flooded cell type, you better avoid 12V mono bloc configurations.
2V cells e.g. 'traction' batteries, yes.
6V 'golf cart' batteries, yes (so so)

12V AGM deep cycle batteries on the other hand, give you a couple hundred cycles all the way down to 100% DOD, and close to 1500 cycles @ 30% DOD.

Where's the manufacturer's data sheet for a 12V flooded type battery showing similar cycle life?

cheers, Peter

0
FollowupID: 756928

Follow Up By: Dennis Ellery - Wednesday, Mar 28, 2012 at 12:11

Wednesday, Mar 28, 2012 at 12:11
AGM’s are good deep cycle batteries – I thought that 80% DOD was the max discharge recommended on a regular cycle, for most deep cycle batteries. A life span of a couple of hundred 100% DOD seems extraordinary.
0
FollowupID: 756947

Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Tuesday, Mar 27, 2012 at 23:41

Tuesday, Mar 27, 2012 at 23:41
You shouldn't be using a wet cell deep cycle inside a canopy. You are running the risk if an explosion if a bit of hydrogen from the battery sees a spark from your fridge.

AGM are safer. Most of the cheap AGMs (eg fullriver, remco etc) should be current limited to around 25 amps and can die when charged directly from an alternator via decent wiring. My Remco went that way. The Optima AGMs can take any current you throw at them, but will cost more and their capacity is less.

Thre is no perfect battery solution - you just need to know the charging characteristics of he battery you own and look after it accordingly. If you want a battery you can install and forget, then get an Optima.
AnswerID: 481566

Follow Up By: Member - Grant- Friday, Mar 30, 2012 at 23:16

Friday, Mar 30, 2012 at 23:16
Yep, if it fits, Optima every time.
0
FollowupID: 757225

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)