Tyre Pressure Monitors ..... Advice please!

Submitted: Tuesday, Apr 03, 2012 at 09:59
ThreadID: 92981 Views:2941 Replies:8 FollowUps:12
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I am currently looking at the whys & wherefores of fitting tyre pressure monitors & feeling like I have opened a can of worms!

My questions to TPM users are:
1. Are in tyre sensors or screw on sensors preferable? (I can see issues with replacing transmitter batteries)

2. Do I go for 6 sensors & fit them to the camper as well.

3. Is there as much difference between brands as there is in price?

4. Are they like a lot of other wireless transmitters that keep losing contact with the receiver?

Thanks.
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Reply By: Ozhumvee - Tuesday, Apr 03, 2012 at 10:33

Tuesday, Apr 03, 2012 at 10:33
I've had the sensatyre with internal band mounted sensors fitted to the Oka for about 15months and 20k k's , they've just about paid for themselves by saving one tyre from destruction due to a slow leak that I probably wouldn't have noticed till too late.
I fitted the remote aerial box under the truck as well to make sure it picked up the spare ok but it isn't really needed unless you have a trailer.
It also goes off when deflating tyres for sand work but quickly readjusts for the lower pressures.
The external type sensors would be very prone to damage when off road and on dirt roads, they also cannot sense the actual tyre temperature correctly as they are spinning around in the breeze which cools them considerably.
Peter
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Follow Up By: JAX W - Tuesday, Apr 03, 2012 at 10:39

Tuesday, Apr 03, 2012 at 10:39
I have the internal SensaTyre system also. Five fitted to the Cruiser with a relay unit mounted above the rear axle, PLUS five fitted to our van with the relay unit fitted above the van front axle. All wired through to display on RH side of dash.

The system works very well and is very reliable. They have been fitted for approximately twelve months and no sign of issues with batteries.

I would highly recommend them. NO connection with Sensa Tyre, other than as a customer.

Regards, Jack
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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Tuesday, Apr 03, 2012 at 14:04

Tuesday, Apr 03, 2012 at 14:04
Jack, you have the system we selected, but never went ahead with due to the logistics of getting it fitted when we were travelling. Very expensive including installation (for eight tyres without considering the spares), but we were looking at temperature readings as well as pressure, as well as internal to avoid stone damage or loss.

Motherhen
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Follow Up By: Ozhumvee - Tuesday, Apr 03, 2012 at 14:24

Tuesday, Apr 03, 2012 at 14:24
I know the cost is not insgnificant initially but it doesn't take long for the system to pay for itself by stopping a repairable puncture turning into a destroyed tyre or two.
Since fitting ours on both occasions that we've suffered a puncture the alarm has gone off and we've stopped, plugged the hole and kept going. I pretty sure that both times the tyres would have been a total loss by the time we noticed that they were flat.
If you are travelling on formed roads then the TPMS system can "replace" a second spare to some degree as the ability to detect the puncture before damage occurs is vital in saving tyres.
After detecting two punctures before damage occurred on our first trip away with the TPMS fitted I figure it has paid for itself and from now on we're in front.
If you are towing then the ability to detect a slowly deflating tyre is great as it will surely self destruct before you are even aware it is flat normally.
Peter
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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Tuesday, Apr 03, 2012 at 15:15

Tuesday, Apr 03, 2012 at 15:15
Hi Peter - particularly so as we have the Simplicity load sharing suspension on the caravan, and when one tyre goes down, you just don't know. People have wrecked rims like this. However in many month's travelling, we only had one tyre incident; when a tyre blew. We heard it, but it was not safe to stop so it rode on the rim for a few kilometres until we could turn off the road. The tyre loss was instantaneous so monitors would not have helped in this case. There may have been some rise in temperature beforehand - but i do not really know. Because of the cost of our tyres and the difficulty of knowing about a flat on the caravan was why we went looking.

Perhaps even the very cheap ones that display a light would be better than nothing. Has anyone tried them?

Mh
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Tuesday, Apr 03, 2012 at 16:03

Tuesday, Apr 03, 2012 at 16:03
Hi MH, although my internal monitor does display temperature I can't see a lot of value in that feature as, if the pressure remains within spec, then the temperature will also be OK. Response to pressure dropping will always be quicker than any temperature-rise response. Accordingly, I think the external type should be equally satisfactory (discounting possible theft, damage etc)

I haven't seen the "cheap light-display" type that you referred to and cannot find such on Google. Do you have a reference?
I do find it a nice comfort to regularly observe the pressure of each individual tyre while travelling but really, it should be sufficient to have a single alarm as, if it activates, inspection would soon reveal the culprit.

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Allan

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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Tuesday, Apr 03, 2012 at 17:33

Tuesday, Apr 03, 2012 at 17:33
This type of one Allan

Light Tyre Pressure Monitors
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Follow Up By: Ozhumvee - Tuesday, Apr 03, 2012 at 18:45

Tuesday, Apr 03, 2012 at 18:45
Bit hard to see them when you are trundling down the road at 80k in the dirt!
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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Tuesday, Apr 03, 2012 at 19:31

Tuesday, Apr 03, 2012 at 19:31
Hi Peter, that is why i wondered if anyone had tried them; that, and constant watching of the caravan wheels for flashing lights, and unable to see all wheels on the tug. The other drawback is your would need several sets for varying tyre pressures as they cannot be adjusted once set.

Mh
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Tuesday, Apr 03, 2012 at 21:03

Tuesday, Apr 03, 2012 at 21:03
Ahh, thanks Motherhen. I had not seen that type although was aware of the similar ones that have a coloured plunger. I was expecting wireless type but with only a single alarm lamp in the cab which would be simpler and as I have said, is really all that is needed. I mean, after all, you only have a single engine temperature alarm, not one for each cylinder.

Cheers
Allan

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Reply By: The Landy - Tuesday, Apr 03, 2012 at 10:38

Tuesday, Apr 03, 2012 at 10:38
Numerous threads on the topic, this is one I started sometime ago, and also references a previous thread as well. We have found them useful, and have them fitted to the TVan also.

Good luck with it...

Tyre Pressure Monitors - Thread

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Reply By: Member - Troll 81 (QLD) - Tuesday, Apr 03, 2012 at 11:14

Tuesday, Apr 03, 2012 at 11:14
I have screw on ones and have not lost one due to rough roads in the 4 years I have had them on. The batteries last around 12 months or so and they are easy to replace. I have the JETTE brand
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Follow Up By: Members - Bow & Nan - Wednesday, Apr 04, 2012 at 07:22

Wednesday, Apr 04, 2012 at 07:22
I have killed 4 Jette screw on sensors on rocky roads in 4 years. They are so unreliable that they now live in the garage.
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Reply By: Mick O - Tuesday, Apr 03, 2012 at 13:08

Tuesday, Apr 03, 2012 at 13:08
Shaker, I own a set of both internal and screw on TPMS. I have written a comprehensive comparison on the two. It may be of some help.

Product review No 6 - Tyre Pressure Monitoring Systems


Cheers Mick








''We knew from the experience of well-known travelers that the
trip would doubtless be attended with much hardship.''
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Reply By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Tuesday, Apr 03, 2012 at 13:32

Tuesday, Apr 03, 2012 at 13:32
Hi Shaker, As well as the references already given, Thread 92688 of 21 March also was of this subject and my views were given there.

However I would comment on your point 2.
I would think that it is even more important to fit the camper as at least in the vehicle you may get some handling indication of an under inflated tyre, whereas on the camper you may not become aware until something more major eventuates.
You may however need to install a repeater to be able to monitor the camper tyres reliably.

Cheers
Allan

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Reply By: Member - Alastair D (NSW) - Tuesday, Apr 03, 2012 at 16:59

Tuesday, Apr 03, 2012 at 16:59
Shaker,
As said above there are a few threads that comment/review various systems.

I have a Jette system (screw on type) which has given no trouble after being on the LC100 for 2.5 years. I have sensors on the camper as well but they have not done much travelling (unfortunately). The batteries have not yet been changed.

I originally got the screw on system so I could transfer it to the Troopy when we were not towing but have actually never bothered.

I have the relay unit but the dash unit picks up the trailer without it operating.

cheers
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Reply By: Member - Scott M (NSW) - Tuesday, Apr 03, 2012 at 17:18

Tuesday, Apr 03, 2012 at 17:18
Keep in mind, strap on sensors are no use if you use tubed tyres or split rims....
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Reply By: Shaker - Tuesday, Apr 03, 2012 at 19:37

Tuesday, Apr 03, 2012 at 19:37
Thanks for all the helpful replies!

One question that I forgot, are they much of a hindrance when airing up & down?

When travelling, particularly in the Outback you can be adjusting pressures several times a day, sometimes down to 15psi or even lower. I imagine that the locked on screw on sensors would be a real nuisance.



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Follow Up By: The Landy - Tuesday, Apr 03, 2012 at 20:19

Tuesday, Apr 03, 2012 at 20:19
Hi Shaker

I just screw mine on and don't use the lock, so no problem in this respect...

Cheers...
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Tuesday, Apr 03, 2012 at 21:09

Tuesday, Apr 03, 2012 at 21:09
Well Shaker, mine are internal so no need to remove them to air up or down.
There is also a switch on the receiver to shift the alarm point between two settings for normal and reduced pressure. With some other models the alarm point can be recalibrated, although perhaps with a little trouble.

Cheers
Allan

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