READING INDISTINCT SERIAL NUMBERS

Submitted: Friday, Apr 06, 2012 at 12:28
ThreadID: 94718 Views:1600 Replies:3 FollowUps:5
This Thread has been Archived
Hi Members:

This may be way outside the scope of this forum, but I have been amazed at the broad knowledge held by many members.

I have an old outboard motor on which the serial number is virtually unreadable. There is something there: I can read a couple of the numbers.

I can recall many years ago, banks requested you write your signature on a piece of paper in the back of your passbook to create an impression of it which, during a transaction, was placed under a light for the teller to check your signature.

I wonder if such a light would show up my indistinct number. If so what sort of light was this and where can I find one. If not how can I read my number?

Thanking you in anticipation

Lynton

Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Member - Bruce C (NSW) - Friday, Apr 06, 2012 at 12:37

Friday, Apr 06, 2012 at 12:37
Hi Lynton,

Pretty sure it was Ultra Violet light.

Bruce.
At home and at ease on a track that I know not and
restless and lost on a track that I know. HL.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  Send Message

AnswerID: 482432

Follow Up By: Member - Bruce C (NSW) - Friday, Apr 06, 2012 at 12:39

Friday, Apr 06, 2012 at 12:39
Just had another thought.
If you have a reasonable digital camera try taking a photo of it and putting it on the computer and zooming in for a close up
At home and at ease on a track that I know not and
restless and lost on a track that I know. HL.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 757657

Follow Up By: Member - John and Val - Friday, Apr 06, 2012 at 12:48

Friday, Apr 06, 2012 at 12:48
And while you are taking a photo try one with low angle light that may help to show up any marks that remain.
Another trick if the number/letters were indented might be to rub some talcum or fine chalk acroos the number, blow off the surplus and see if there is any white stuff left in the indents.

Cheers,

Val
J and V
"Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted."
- Albert Einstein

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 757658

Follow Up By: Member - Richard W (NSW) - Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 06:36

Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 06:36
Lynton,

If you have Photoshop it's also worth ramping up the contast.
I've had success doing this.
0
FollowupID: 757697

Reply By: Fred G NSW - Friday, Apr 06, 2012 at 12:51

Friday, Apr 06, 2012 at 12:51
Lynton, it may be just alloy corrosion covering the stenciled numbers. I would try a very light rub with very fine wet and dry paper, or a metal polish. I have used that myself and it worked for me.
After each rub, polish across the number with a cloth. If there is still enough of the numbers there, they will be darker than the surrounding shiny allow.

Fred.
AnswerID: 482434

Follow Up By: Member - Peter R (QLD) - Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 08:14

Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 08:14
What about placing a sheet of paper over number and rubbing a lead pencil over the numbers?

Pedro
0
FollowupID: 757702

Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 20:00

Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 20:00
I've done the same as Fred - rub with 400 Grade Wet and Dry paper.
0
FollowupID: 757735

Reply By: Member - Lynton B (QLD) - Monday, Apr 16, 2012 at 07:00

Monday, Apr 16, 2012 at 07:00
A BIG thank you to Bruce, Val, Richard, Fred and Peter R for your suggestions. Tried almost all and found that reading it in a low angled light worked best.
Thanks again to you all. I really appreciated your responses.
Lynton
AnswerID: 483252

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)