meteor craters WA

Hi all
On a recent thread I presented, someone mentioned the Wolf Creek Crater not worth the distance to go there and the condition of the Tanami Road could be rather bad. Therefore I am wondering if any of you know of some craters that I can show my Grandies that is closer to the NW Coast Hwy and the Great Nthn Hwy in place of the WCC. I have searched and found one on Woodleigh Station however dont know if they allow tourists I have sent an email to the shire but no response. Has anyone else seen this particular one?
Ta much
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Reply By: Ron N - Wednesday, May 02, 2012 at 11:52

Wednesday, May 02, 2012 at 11:52
Dirt Princess - There are no meteorite craters in W.A., that are close to civilisation and immediately identifiable as craters.
Because Australia is such an old continent, most craters are eroded badly - and several are so huge as well, they are really only identifiable from satellite imagery. Woodleigh falls into the latter category.

Wolfe Creek is best seen from the air, because of its size. Veevers is the most identifiable and least eroded - but it's very remote, located 16kms off the Gary Hwy between the Great Sandy and Gibson Deserts.

You just might have to find some other interesting landforms to show the grandies, because spectactular meteorite craters in W.A. are virtually a non-event.

http://www.thelivingmoon.com/43ancients/02files/Earth_Images_06.html

Cheers - Ron.
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Follow Up By: Member - Joe F (WA) - Wednesday, May 02, 2012 at 12:32

Wednesday, May 02, 2012 at 12:32
G'day Ron

Please do not take my reply to your post as a direct criticism of you or your knowledge.

Very sadly public knowledge of the Hickman Meteorite Impact Crater has been pretty much kept quiet in Australia, although the craters existance is real and all scientific data can be accessed on the internet ~ all you or the enquirer needs to know that it actually exists.

People from all walks of life have visited the Crater since its discovery in July of 2007.
There are requirements that need to be applied for and accepted simply because the crater lies in a significant Iron Ore mining tenement.

I visit the Crater several times each month, the changes planned for in the immediate region to the crater are simply frightening and I can only guess that the less you and the rest of the broarder community knows the better it is for the mining industry.

I suggest that you might GoogleHickman Crater and learn about the crater.

Ron, no malice is intended in my reply.

Safe travels :
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Reply By: Member - Joe F (WA) - Wednesday, May 02, 2012 at 12:02

Wednesday, May 02, 2012 at 12:02
G'day

There are several accessible Meteorite Impact sites in Western Australia, obviously the recorded history as such is rather limited.

Google the subject and be prepaired to be amaized.

The most recent impact site discovered in 2007 is the Hickman Crater ~ 35km's North of Newman in the Pilbara.

Access to the Hickman Crater is free, although difficult due to its remoteness but you should be aware of the requirement in obtaining a BHP-Billiton rail access road travel permit.

The crater is almost intact and a genuinely special Astro`Geological feature, shame it happens to be in a mining tenement.

The Newman Visitor Centre hands out free mud maps and the BHP-B, permits can be applied for at the NVC, BE WARNED the NVC information can be dubious.
Image Could Not Be Found
Safe travels:
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Reply By: Mick O - Wednesday, May 02, 2012 at 12:09

Wednesday, May 02, 2012 at 12:09
Wolfe Creek is worth the trip, just take it slower on the road and drive to suit the conditions. The Tanimi at the northern end is fairly well maintained due to the amount of traffic it receives from the communities. Having said that, you can expect the odd rough patch.

Wolfe Creek Blog - Photos & Video

Veevers is a small hole in the ground easily dismissed as just another sandy bowl

Veevers Crater Blog & Photos

Give it a crack.

Cheers Mick
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trip would doubtless be attended with much hardship.''
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Follow Up By: Kris and Kev - Wednesday, May 02, 2012 at 13:20

Wednesday, May 02, 2012 at 13:20
I agree, Wolf Creek is worth a trip. And when we went there last year it was still in WA!
Great fee camping area there too. Very assessable walk to it and around the rim and if you disregard the sign, to the centre. Just one word of warning! I have heard that people have car troubles there, but if you do, just call Mick. But I hope it is not the same Mick as above?
Kevin
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Follow Up By: Mick O - Wednesday, May 02, 2012 at 13:25

Wednesday, May 02, 2012 at 13:25
Mwooh ha ha (Evil laugh there!).

''We knew from the experience of well-known travelers that the
trip would doubtless be attended with much hardship.''
Richard Maurice - 1903

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Reply By: Rod W - Wednesday, May 02, 2012 at 14:19

Wednesday, May 02, 2012 at 14:19
And then there is the Mt Dooling meteorite impact site, marked with a small cairn, which is 5ks east of the Mt Manning Range. Theres no hole but a 700kg delta winged meteorite was discovered there in 1979 and is stored in the WA Museum.
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Follow Up By: Member - Joe F (WA) - Wednesday, May 02, 2012 at 15:47

Wednesday, May 02, 2012 at 15:47
G'day Rod W

There is also a fairly well known of little crater not to far out of Cue in Western Australia.
It really isn't as spectacular to the eye as either Wolfe Creek or the Hickman Crater, but it is a bona fide crater, by the name of "dalgaranga".

Safe travels:
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Follow Up By: equinox - Wednesday, May 02, 2012 at 20:54

Wednesday, May 02, 2012 at 20:54
I've been to Dalgaranga Meteorite Impact Crater in 2009.

Easy run in.

Click on the link, I've put a couple of pictures up there, as has Doug T.

Cheers
Alan


Looking for adventure.
In whatever comes our way.
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Follow Up By: Member - Joe F (WA) - Thursday, May 03, 2012 at 10:39

Thursday, May 03, 2012 at 10:39
G'day Alan

Yes indeed its a very easy run to Dalgaranga, but the country side is spectacular especially in the "flower season".

This little crater seems rather insignificant at first sight, but if you know of or care to learn about its origins ~ its quite remarkable really.

Walga Rock and the ancient Wilgie Mia ochre mine were my targets on that particular trip, although a few years ago now and with limited time, Maria and I still managed to stay four days ~ simply exploring.

Safe travels:
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Reply By: The Explorer - Wednesday, May 02, 2012 at 14:52

Wednesday, May 02, 2012 at 14:52
Hi

You may find this interesting

Book - Australia's Meteorite Craters

Cheers
Greg
I sent one final shout after him to stick to the track, to which he replied “All right,” That was the last ever seen of Gibson - E Giles 23 April 1874

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Reply By: Motherhen - Wednesday, May 02, 2012 at 15:43

Wednesday, May 02, 2012 at 15:43
Wolf Creek can be visited as a day trip from Halls Creek - an option for those not wanting to tow on the Tanami or the corrugated access track.

This may give you a few options to investigate: Meteorite Craters in Australia

Motherhen

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Reply By: Member - John and Val - Wednesday, May 02, 2012 at 15:44

Wednesday, May 02, 2012 at 15:44
Hi again Dirt Princess,

Oh, the perils of the written word ... I think I may have been one who suggested giving WCC a miss. BUT (and a big but too) that was in the context of what then seemed like a very big trip for the time available - and a fair detour from your proposed route.

If you have plenty of time, and if you are doing the Tanami, then WCC is certainly worth a visit, but be aware that the access road in from the Tanami is very corrugated, and the Tanami can be rough as well. There is a basic camping area there - just pit toilets and maybe a bit of water in a tank (?).

I guess the old journalists saying holds true - the answers you get depend on the questions you ask :-))

Cheers,

Val
J and V
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Follow Up By: Dirt Princess - Thursday, May 03, 2012 at 00:12

Thursday, May 03, 2012 at 00:12
Sorry Val
It was a little of what you said but also the many posts I have read about the Tanami Road that made me question the worth of going out of our way. I have adjusted some of our plans since receiving the advice of the more experienced travellers. I think I will still consider WCC and might even do a few others. The information supplied on this thread has been enormous. Thanks everyone.
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Reply By: SDG - Wednesday, May 02, 2012 at 16:32

Wednesday, May 02, 2012 at 16:32
Watched a documentoy the other week about some Americans visiting the old metorite sites, finding old meteorite fragments, and making a buck off them.
AnswerID: 484811

Follow Up By: Dirt Princess - Thursday, May 03, 2012 at 00:05

Thursday, May 03, 2012 at 00:05
Mmmmmm..... Now who would be so gullible to buy? Where's the proof that it is. Might be worth thinkin' about if I were broke. A few bob might go a fair way. Nah! I couldn't do it to the poor suckers.
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Follow Up By: Ron N - Thursday, May 03, 2012 at 10:50

Thursday, May 03, 2012 at 10:50
I'm not sure about Dirt Princesses grandies, but most kids nowadays would be pretty underwhelmed by visiting a crater, with most expecting to see something that they've seen in a Hollywood action movie.

I think I'd be more inclined to go hunting for meteorites on the Nullarbor, than go looking at (mostly) greatly weathered craters. The meteorites on the Nullarbor stick out because they're mostly dark basalt, but the Nullarbor is mostly light-coloured limestone.

The Nullarbor is noted for fantastic meteorite finds, with most of the Southern Hemispheres best examples found there. The W.A. Museum has about 500 in their possession, and many haven't yet been fully examined.

The sad part is - you can't collect - or even own - or even pick up a meterorite! (in W.A., anyway). The little known, Museum Act 1969 - Section 45, prohibits all of the above - and you're only entitled to a reward for information leading to the recovery of a meteorite not previously known to the Museum Trustees, or expenses incurred in recovering same.

http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/legis/wa/consol_act/ma1969107/s45.html

Cheers - Ron.
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