Panicking and hesitance due to being alone on those remote journeys

Submitted: Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 00:21
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Hi all,

My thoughts go back to 2007, when I had a few days to kill in Wiluna. I was in Wiluna early due to changing my mind about a route I had planned to take, which I didn't due do to my hesitance of being in a remote area by myself...more about that in a moment...

I didn't want to hang around thumb twiddling in Wiluna so had decided to go up the first bit of the CSR to after well 5 and visit the Carnarvon Range, before heading back to Wiluna via Neds Creek to meet my brother at the airport, to go on another remote journey. No problems!!!!

When I got to Well 2, which was near the beginning of the CSR, there was a couple stopped there in a Troopie. The Troopie was very well set up, enough to make the normal 4WDriver quite jealous; they could have driven anywhere in my opinion, and for extended periods...

The man was comforting his missus. She was spewing up, had the runs, and was crying. Most upset. It turns out she was very anxious about going into this "very remote area" by themselves. She was panicking, and their planned journey up the CSR to Well 23 was cancelled at that point, right at the start. I felt sorry for the bloke, all decked out with nowhere to go....he said they would go back to Wiluna and probably head north along the bitumen.....I bid them farewell and continued up the CSR by myself.

Well I can empathise with these people, as I had just cancelled a planned route I had in mind, the very reason I was in Wiluna early.

I had planned to head into the bush from Windy Corner to visit Nipper Pinnacle and then head south to the Alfred and Marie Range and then back via Mount Cox to come back to the Gary Highway near the Young Range (off road).

After I had passed the CSR heading east along the Talawana toward the corner (by myself, single vehicle) I started to think to myself what would could go wrong if something went amiss with the vehicle or myself once I got into really remote country (this was only my second really remote trip and first by myself). I didn't spew or have the runs, but the beads of sweat would have been visible on my forehead. Thinking hard to myself, I changed my plan - I'll only go out to the Pinnacle by myself (90 kms east of the Gary Highway) and then come back and pick up my brother at Wiluna and do the rest of the planned journey to the Alfred and Marie Range with him, at the expense of seeing other areas - which I still to this day have not visited.

I was a bit hard on myself later for chickening out, however when you have a gut feeling that something may be amiss, I think it wise to act on your feelings.

These are two extremes, examples of what that remote bush air does to your soul, however, even though they were completely different circumstances I completely understand what that woman at Well 2 was going through.

Anyone else had the heebie geebies out there?

Cheers
Alan







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Reply By: Wayne's 60 - Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 00:44

Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 00:44
Hi Alan,

We still have problems with people that will set up a mega dollar touring vehicle ...... and not attend a 4WD training course prior to departure ........... so that a lot of anxieties about remote travel can be put to rest, prior to departure.

Having said that, on a recent trip out into the Eastern Goldfields we were shown a very nice and secluded camp site ............. two hours after arrival, Sally was a shaking wreck ............. there are few times I have or will pack up a camp site after 9:00 PM and travel 100 kms to a new location.

We understand that the best laid plans can go astray, weather conditions can change, a well maintained vehicle can suffer a failure or crash.

At the end of the day, gut feelings are something to be well considered when travelling the outback, regardless of the preparation that has been put into place.

Cheers,
Wayne & Sally.
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Reply By: Ron N - Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 01:15

Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 01:15
I can remember the story when Bell Bros were trucking the manganese ore from Woodie Woodie to Pt Hedland in the early 1950's. The Woodie Woodie road was just a track for hundreds of kms out into the semi-desert.

The truckdrivers who drove the Bell Bros trucks had to be a resourceful, independent, outback breed. Not only did they have to drive bone-shaking old ERF's and Fodens with wooden-framed cabs, no A/C, and a seat like a park bench - as well as endless corrugations, choking dust, and shocking heat - but they had to do it on their own.

Bell Bros would get drivers up from the city, and a lot of them would break down and refuse to drive the trucks on the Woodie Woodie run.
A big number of the Perth born and bred drivers couldn't cope with the utter loneliness of the run, that would often take a week or more - if things went well.

When they broke down and couldn't fix the break, they had to sit and wait until someone realised they were missing, and then Bells would send out a search party. There were no communications. Either Bell Bros were too tight to install HF radios, or they figured they'd fall to pieces on that dreadful track.

Here's one to test you. This actually happened to a bloke I knew. You're out in the semi-desert country, hundreds of miles from Kalgoorlie, doing geological survey. You've got a good Ford F100 ute, and plenty of food and water - but no communications - and you're on your own.
You leave the radio on accidentally over about 3 days in your camp, and when you go to start the (V8) F100, the battery is dead flat!
You've got no spare battery, no way of charging the dead battery - and no-one will come looking for you for at least a couple of weeks.
What would you do, to get out of that pickle??

(He got the F100 started, and got out - but how?)

Cheers - Ron.
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Follow Up By: pepper2 - Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 07:03

Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 07:03
Jacked up rear wheel,put it in gear wrapped a rope around the tyre are rotated the tyre sufficiently to fire the engine ????????
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Follow Up By: Member - Wamuranman - Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 07:14

Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 07:14
Did he get a bit more power from battery by lifting bonnet allowing battery to warm up in the sun, top up the battery with vinegar or urine (assuming it wasn't a sealed battery)?

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Follow Up By: Mick O - Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 08:16

Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 08:16
Removed and warmed the battery fluid, returning it to the battery case and cranking while it was hot?
''We knew from the experience of well-known travelers that the
trip would doubtless be attended with much hardship.''
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Follow Up By: Ron N - Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 10:06

Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 10:06
Pepper2 is on the ball. He'd survive O.K. in the outback! Yes, the bloke took a number of spark plugs out to reduce compression, and tried to fire the V8 up by wrapping a rope around the crankshaft pulley.

He couldn't get enough engine speed up to make it fire that way - so he jacked up a back wheel, put it in top gear, and wrapped the rope around the wheel.

Once it had started, he put the plugs back in while it was running (no mean feat in itself!), and then packed up and got going - never daring to stop it again for at least a couple of hours!

I can remember when I first got my Engel in 1977, we went camping, and I only had a single battery in my 4WD F100. Like a silly young lad, I never checked the battery draw of the Engel and left the Engel on all night. Come morning, I had the flattest battery I've ever had.
It was so flat, it didn't even have enough current in it, to light the idiot lights on the dash!

Luckily, we were camping at Duke of Orleans bay, so there were plenty of other 4WD's around to give me a tow. A bloke with a HJ45 gave me a tow, and amazingly, when I let the clutch out in top gear at about 20kmh, it still wouldn't fire up!
We had to tow the F100 at about 50kmh in top gear, for about 200M, before it generated enough current to fire up.

A sudden-failure, dead-flat battery is the greatest threat to your survival in the outback. Luckily, we now have portable and convenient jump-start battery packs - and anyone going into remote areas now has a dual-battery setup installed - but many people used to venture into the remote areas in the old days, with only one battery!

Cheers - Ron.
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Follow Up By: equinox - Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 11:41

Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 11:41
Hi Ron - I think it was Jack Absalom who did that in one of his TV shows a couple of decades ago. Great idea!!

Cheers
Alan

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Follow Up By: Shaker - Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 21:10

Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 21:10
Sounds like an urban myth to me!
If he had an alternator it wouldn't matter how long he drove, it wouldn't charge a dead flat battery, neither would yours have after tow start.
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Follow Up By: PJR (NSW) - Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 23:22

Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 23:22
I may be wrong but back then it is quite possible that he had a generator not an alternator. ??? I don't know anything about the F100.
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Follow Up By: Ron N - Sunday, May 06, 2012 at 22:09

Sunday, May 06, 2012 at 22:09
Shaker - I'm sorry to advise you this, but I can assure you my F100 started just fine after 200M of towing, and the battery charged up just fine after a hour. I was there, it wasn't an urban myth related to me. As Pauline might say - "please explain?".
Both vehicles were fitted with alternators - alternators appeared on most vehicles around 1965-1967.

Cheers - Ron.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Monday, May 07, 2012 at 00:24

Monday, May 07, 2012 at 00:24
Then clearly the battery was not "dead flat", there was sufficient in it to provide some small current to the alternator field to generate some output, which in turn supplies the field with a bit more and so on. Within a few seconds the alternator would be producing full output to charge the battery.

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Reply By: pop2jocem - Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 01:18

Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 01:18
Hi Alan,

Yep, I can certainly understand the initial nervous feelings just before any remote area adventure. I guess no matter how well you do your preparation and planning there is always the feeling of "what contingency have I not made allowance for".
The wife and I have been travelling without the kids and a lot of the time by ourselves for some time now and strange as it may sound I often wish I was doing the trip without the good lady. Not because she is hard to travel with or that we don't get on, quite the contrary, she is a great companion, but the thought that she is putting her life in my hands (does that sound a bit melodramatic) sometimes makes my guts churn. She to her eternal credit always says "no worries, if something goes wrong you will find a way out". If I am by myself, well it's only my dopey neck that is on the line.
But would I want to go without her and would she let me....hmmm... not likely, so I guess I will keep trying to allow for mishaps, let the butterfly's have a field day before departure and keep on travelling.

Cheers
Pop
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Reply By: Life Member - Phil B (WA) - Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 02:11

Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 02:11
Another interesting topic Alan,

Whilst I don't go as remote as you when solo, I do notice I get more apprehensive when I've got the missus and the kids (two dogs) on board. I'm definitely not as relaxed.

You said it beautifully when you said;
"I was a bit hard on myself later for chickening out, however when you have a gut feeling that something may be amiss, I think it wise to act on your feelings."

cheers
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Reply By: fisho64 - Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 02:36

Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 02:36
One thing Ive learnt from being at sea-ANYTHING mechanical can fail, no matter how well serviced, how new etc
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Follow Up By: equinox - Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 11:43

Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 11:43
How true that is..

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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 12:43

Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 12:43
And anything can be fixed................. at a price!

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Follow Up By: Member - 2000 Red Rodeo - Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 14:09

Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 14:09
We had a major engine failure on an engine that was only 12 months old about 20 kms out of Innaminkca in October last year.

Sometimes it doesn't matter how much time and money you spend in preparation if Murphy has you in his sights. Up until the failure the car had been running like a dream.

Heading for the Simpson again in July. Must say I'm feeling a little nervous. As I have said to my travelling companions I'll count the trip a success if I get to drive all the way home.

One lesson I learnt is to have the top RACV cover. Which I didn't have at the time because my car never brakes down. That was a $2000 mistake.
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Follow Up By: rainbowprof - Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 21:10

Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 21:10
Red said "One lesson I learnt is to have the top RACV cover. Which I didn't have at the time because my car never brakes down. That was a $2000 mistake."

Yep, done the same. Once I let the RAC lapse. That time I blew up my motor. More fool me! Top level cover, pays for itself every time. Last time the immobilizer stayed immobilized when I tried to start the truck! Cooee, RAC please.
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Reply By: Member - shane c5 - Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 08:39

Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 08:39
yeah, had one of those moments a couple of days ago when I did the reccy into Barnet River gorge. Very nearly didn't do it but thought if I walked the track as I drove it it would be ok. No one knew where I was, no one on the roads and 8 tonne of truck. Even went as far as just putting front tyres on dirt I thought may be a bit dicey. I did have a sat phone, but found out I had the wrong no. for the office. hahaha Rendered the sat phone useless. Took me 1.5 huors in and 25 mins back out.

shane c5
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Reply By: Mick O - Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 08:51

Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 08:51
On those solo trips you can spend a bit of time perched on top of a sandhill contemplating the capricious nature of the gods...or you can just get on with it and enjoy it.

I must admit that I am not as mechanically experienced as some so spend a lot of time making sure the vehicle is in top condition but as said above, regardless of quality things will, and do break out there. If I've learnt one thing from Jaydub over the years, it's how to calmly look at an issue and work back, identifying things that aren't causing your problem until by reasoned elimination, you should have identified the issue (hopefully). Modern vehicles do worry me with their level of complexity these days but by and large, the engines are reliable.

If it's something I can't deal with, I have a satphone to call for help and always ensure that someone knows my route plan and itinerary. If I deviate from the plan, I always let someone know, even if it's by a hand written note passed to someone travelling on the Canning in the opposite direction.

What I do shake my head at on a personal level is the naivety I headed off with on my earlier trips. Yes there is no substitute for experience built up over time but I do shudder at things that could have happened back then.

Probably the single most frightening thing I found about outback travel these days is other peoples lack of preparedness. I refer to knowledge skills and actual vehicle preparedness as well. I’ve seen some pretty interesting sights over the years (you’d be surprised how far into the interior a Camry with a queen size mattress strapped to the roof can make it through sheer ignorance!) and I am constantly amazed and disappointed by what I find out there. It can be very frustrating when people forget the simplest of golden rules and then expect everyone else to bail them out of trouble and I’m not talking about carrying Repco with you here, just the simple things like comms, water, tyres, tools and a few essential sparse. Mind you many make it through purely by sheer luck ignorance (or insanity)!

I like a good solo adventure but there is no substitute for travelling the wilds in the company of good and experienced friends.
''We knew from the experience of well-known travelers that the
trip would doubtless be attended with much hardship.''
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Follow Up By: Ron N - Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 10:15

Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 10:15
Mick, the gods delight in making sure the part that breaks, is the one you haven't got! - no matter how well prepared you are!

A group of farmer friends went up the CSR in '89. I was supposed to go with them, but had to pull out a couple of weeks before they left due to other pressing issues.
One of the blokes loaded up his HJ47 with everything they thought they might need - and then found the HJ47 was well over 3 tonnes in gross weight!

They all sorted out what was REALLY important to take, and then pared the weight down. They took a wide range of spares - but then, one of the Landcruisers broke a tie-rod end, near the middle of the CSR!
Of course, no-one had packed a tie-rod end! This meant a big deviation for one of the mob to make a rush trip into Newman, to dig up a new tie-rod end!

Cheers - Ron.
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Follow Up By: Member - John (Vic) - Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 12:08

Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 12:08
Don't be a wooz Mick, just get out and do it!!
Live fast die young and leave a good looking corpse I always say!! :))

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Reply By: Bravo Man - Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 08:56

Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 08:56
Hi all

I just finished 18 months solo around OZ and before I left I bought a PLB.

I bought it more for solo Bushwalking as I was worried about accidents or getting bitten by a snake,but it did give me confidence to do some semi remote desert tracks as well.

Cheers....Peter
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Reply By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 09:27

Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 09:27
Hi Alan,

I usually have no undue concern about remote travel after careful preparation but there has been an instance where my gut feelings came into play.

We were camped alone in an isolated but not very remote spot when a pair of young blokes arrived and got on the turps. As nightfall approached their revelry increased to the point where I became concerned that we may become the object of their amusement and my intuition prompted me to just chuck everything into the back of the troopy and get the Princess out of there.

Maybe it was only innocent exuberant behaviour but Discretion is the Better Part of Valour.

Cheers
Allan

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Reply By: Member - David M (SA) - Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 10:30

Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 10:30
Spend a fair amount of time solo in the bush and always have the EPIRB with me.
Money well spent for the peace of mind.
Dave.
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Follow Up By: equinox - Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 11:47

Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 11:47
Hi Dave,
I carry a Spot and satphone with me, good insurance - they still may not help quick enough for a deadly snake bite though or other similar incidences.

Cheers
Alan

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In whatever comes our way.
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Reply By: TerraMer - Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 10:47

Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 10:47
I do a lot solo - trekking, travel to exotic and remote places, living and working in isolation. It never bothers me except when I'm campaign walking and need to camp by the side of the road or in exposed rest stops with no other campers in sight. The first few nights on unfamiliar highways I get the heebie jeebies and barely sleep as each new noise alerts me to all the possibilities. My mind is never satisfied it's just a possum or some livestock in the paddock over the road. No, it's obviously someone about to attack me or steal my trek cart or light my tent on fire. The mind can play silly tricks when it has only itself to rationalise with.

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Reply By: MEMBER - Darian, SA - Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 10:47

Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 10:47
'Remoteness' is relative to the individual in question - friend of ours had an overseas rello here years back that had a 'remoteness' panic attack on the Stuart highway, north of Pt Augusta - couldn't handle the vast outback (coming from a densely populated European city). One half of my 'expeditionary team' has a greatly different view on that issue to this other half (choosing my words carefully here :-o)..... as a result, our excursions into the outback are often not what they could be !
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Follow Up By: Ron N - Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 12:36

Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 12:36
Darian - Funny you should mention that. An Italian mechanic friend owned a garage, and his father came out from Italy to visit. Sam decided to show him the North.
The old fella was quite amazed at the scenery - but the eye-opener came when they were halfway between Pt. Hedland and Broome.

The old fella suddenly screamed out - ""Stop da car! Stop da car!!" Sam came to a screeching halt, thinking something was drastically wrong.
The old fella jumped out and wandered around in a stupor, with his hands out, waving them around.
Sam says, "What's up?". The old fella says, "So MUCH!! - of da NOTHING!!! So MUCH of da NOTHING!!!!" LOL

The old fella just couldn't get a grasp on the vastness and the emptiness of the great NW.
Coming from a heavily populated place where he'd lived all his life, it was just too much for him to take in.

Cheers - Ron.
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Follow Up By: get outmore - Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 13:12

Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 13:12
mates aunty came over from italy and i took them out to Lake ballard for exactly that reason
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Follow Up By: Member - Scott M (NSW) - Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 13:30

Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 13:30
Yeah - it's a funny sensation..... even experienced travellers like most of us on this forum can still get the emptiness 'willies' ...

A couple of times in the middle of nowhere with nothing significant insight, I've stopped to take in the sheer emptiness of outback Oz, and suddenly get that creepy feeling like you're the last person on Earth.

I've tried to explain to some of my work colleagues what the vast 'nothing' is like - can be hard to find words.

Having said that, 99% of the time I love the emptiness. One of my favourite memories is standing by myself on the rim of Wolfe Crater with no-one else for a 100 miles around watching a spectacular sunset with the horizon 360 deg around. Could even see the curve of the Earth.
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Reply By: Crackles - Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 17:16

Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 17:16
Have witnessed the stress several times even from so called seasoned travellers who have gone off the rails normally on the 2nd or 3rd day after leaving the last civilization. It's something that a trip leader really needs to carefully manage. The best option to settle the nerves when travelling remote areas is to surround yourself with successfull well trained & equipped people. On a run to Lake Eyre by boat we had a police seargent from the search & rescue sqaud, a MICA Ambo from the air wing, a critical care nurse from the Alfred, a member of the boat sqad & me. At no point was anyone concerned about what might happen as we felt the experience & preparedness of the group could handle any situation.
Best advice to avoid the heebies is to plan well & if the situation changes to stop, have a cuppa & reassess the options.
Cheers Craig..............
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Reply By: cobber - Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 17:45

Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 17:45
For peace of mind in the outback fit a HF Radio and join one of the HF Clubs you will always have someone to talk to if you want.
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Reply By: Rockape - Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 18:34

Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 18:34
Allen,

I have been watching this with great interest. Thanks for starting it.

I know when I was young I didn't have any problems going anywhere but even then I would feel the pangs of fear at times. Mainly after I had done something stupid and got away with it.

When I think back to where I have travelled and what I was driving at the time I just shake my head.

Yes sometimes the hair on the back of my neck still stands up when certain things happen or I will feel uncomfortable about where I am or what I am doing.

RA.

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Reply By: Member - MUZBRY(Vic) - Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 20:04

Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 20:04
Gday
I find when i am lonely and on my own in the bush with pangs of anxiety and stress, just have a game of patience , someone will turn up and tell you to put the queen on the king.

Muzbry
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Follow Up By: Gramps - Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 23:24

Saturday, May 05, 2012 at 23:24
Sounds like another excerpt from Jack Absalom.
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Follow Up By: Member - Scott M (NSW) - Sunday, May 06, 2012 at 01:47

Sunday, May 06, 2012 at 01:47
take a leak by the side of the road .... someone always drives past.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Sunday, May 06, 2012 at 09:41

Sunday, May 06, 2012 at 09:41
That's GOLD Scott !!!!!!

Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Member - Richard H - West NSW - Sunday, May 06, 2012 at 09:46

Sunday, May 06, 2012 at 09:46
'Sounds like another excerpt from Jack Absalom'.

Yeah, most certainly the things that you do not do.

Some years ago a couple of ornithologists went out into the Tanami, to look at birds, I suppose. They hired a radio from the RFDS at Alice Springs, and took off into the ooloo.

When it came time to return their vehicle wouldn't start, so they tried to crank up the RFDS, the radio that they hired but it wouldn't work. So they had to wait for about 14 days until their family realised that they had passed their 'return by' date, and got the NTPOL to organise a search. Of course they were found by a hired aircraft in double quick time, and help quickly arrived.

These people from all accounts were intrepid desert travellers, had adequate food and even went to the extreme of draining & flushing the vehicles' radiator and filling it with potable water. So as to ensure that no vehicles drove past their location they even built up a bush barricade across the nearby track, so to stop any passing traffic.

But 14 days out in the scrub waiting to be rescued. Wow, I'd go nuts.
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Follow Up By: Member - Scott M (NSW) - Sunday, May 06, 2012 at 10:04

Sunday, May 06, 2012 at 10:04
Allan, it would be joke if it were not true.... 3 'incidents' spring to mind:

1. travelling between Marla & Oodnadatta - hadn't seen a vehicle all day and stopped for a leak - family with campervan chose that moment to hove over a rise...

2. On the Tanami between Billiluna & Rabbit Flat - had seen one vehicle all day, stopped for a leak - another family with campervan barrelled around a corner

In both these cases didn't see another vehicle all day.....

3. Somewhere between Balcanoona & Frome downs - had to stop for a no. 2 - thought I was reasonably sheltered from the road until on of those double decker tour buses thundered past with all the old biddies on the top deck getting eyeful of moonshine.....
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Sunday, May 06, 2012 at 10:15

Sunday, May 06, 2012 at 10:15
I'll keep an eye out for you Scott! LOL

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Reply By: The Landy - Sunday, May 06, 2012 at 11:13

Sunday, May 06, 2012 at 11:13
I am strongly of the view that any adventure should be well planned, and include consideration of how you will respond to challenges that may arise, either expected, or unexpected. And once having planned the trip, and how you will deal with arising challenges, stick to it.

This might include go, or no-go scenarios etc. After all if you can rationally consider these scenarios and how you will deal with in the comfort of the living room at home before you leave it will give you great confidence when you get underway, and dispel fears or misapprehensions you or your travelling companions may have.

Making decisions or the run when the pressure is on can, and often does lead to poor decisions being made, possibly involving life and death scenarios.

And yes, you can’t plan for all possible contingencies, but you can have a plan as to how you might deal with the unexpected…

Food for thought, hopefully!

Cheers, The Landy
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Sunday, May 06, 2012 at 11:56

Sunday, May 06, 2012 at 11:56
How boring. Fill the tanks, point it toward the Bush....... and wheeeeeeeeeee!! LOL

Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Sunday, May 06, 2012 at 17:14

Sunday, May 06, 2012 at 17:14
Sorry Landy for my tongue-in-cheek response above but I couldn't help it!

But seriously, I have a differing stance on trip planning. As individuals we each have our own way of dealing with things and that does not make one right and the other wrong, just different.

For my own part I make careful and comprehensive preparations in respect of vehicle maintenance and preparedness together with adequate supplies for extended periods. Clearly I must make some geographic plan or I would not get out of the suburbs. But I often make no further plan than to head toward a general area and decide on the routes and stopovers as they appear. I do make "decisions on the run" and they are rarely if ever "poor". It happens to be an innate skill and my career occupations have honed it.

Furthermore I would not expect to be alone with the ability to make adequate decisions without extensive deliberation. Because one cannot plan for all contingencies it is perhaps preferable to only commit to what is reasonably certain and develop the capacity of purposive and prompt decision making. This does not preclude the consideration and possible actions toward possible unplanned scenarios.

Make plans by all means but do not then consider that all bases are covered. Be Aware certainly but also be alert to the need for spontaneous action even if it is driven by Gut Feeligs.



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Allan

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Follow Up By: The Landy - Sunday, May 06, 2012 at 18:09

Sunday, May 06, 2012 at 18:09
No need to apologise, as you say each to their own...although my response was in the context of remote area travel.

Oddly enough having a plan of action is only part of the story, recognising the need to implement it is another discipline altogether, many people have come to grief not only through lack of planning, but also failing to implement a well formulated plan even when they have recognised things are going pear-shape.

Human factors...a very interesting topic!

Cheers...

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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Sunday, May 06, 2012 at 18:31

Sunday, May 06, 2012 at 18:31
Landy, it's really nice to have a difference of opinion without getting into a heated argument. Thanks mate. Hope to meet you outback some time. Cheers.

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Allan

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Reply By: patrolmann - Tuesday, May 08, 2012 at 15:40

Tuesday, May 08, 2012 at 15:40
Hi Guys,
A couple of years ago I headed off alone from Adelaide to Perth Towing my was due at Denmark in the South of WA for my Nieces wedding and was to arrive on the Wed.

I stopped at Esperance and had some time up my sleeve so I headed out to see Cape Le Grand national Park. Spent most of the day there and came out on the beach at the other end of the park. Spoke to the only other 4x4 on the beach who was leaving as came on. He said I could take the beach all the way back to Esperence about 60 ks and save going all the way back around.
So off I heaed on my own and after about 9ks it was getting very soft and not a sole in site.
Suddenly thoughts coming to me i have no idea if this guy knows the area he told me to go, I have no idea if the tide is in or out and how far does it come up, If I get bogged no one will know where i am.
I found a fairly hard bit of sand and turned around and drove back the 9ks i had just travelled and then all the way back around to on the.

I kept thinking to myself that was a stupid thing to do with not knowing the area, the conditions and letting someone know where i was.
I was never so glad to get back to my van lol
A good lesson learned that day.
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