Graphite in Gearbox ?

Submitted: Wednesday, Jan 07, 2004 at 21:19
ThreadID: 9571 Views:4765 Replies:9 FollowUps:1
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Hello
Has anyone ever heard of putting a bottle of Graphite in the Gearbox Manual Gearbox.
Just wondered if any of you have ever heard of this being done.

Thanks in advance for replys.

Shane
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Reply By: Bob Y. - Qld - Wednesday, Jan 07, 2004 at 22:17

Wednesday, Jan 07, 2004 at 22:17
Shane,
When I was kid, they used to talk about doing this, but the biggest problem was it would settle on floor of g'box, and there was a lot of debate as to whether it got picked while the vehcile was mobile.
Probably why most of those additives are liquid these days?
hooroo...
AnswerID: 42138

Reply By: howesy - Wednesday, Jan 07, 2004 at 22:42

Wednesday, Jan 07, 2004 at 22:42
Especially if it is a toyota gearbox, notchiness andhard changing especially when cold can be cured 9 times out of ten by draining the trans. and re-filling with MTX80 motorbike racing transmission oil. the 80 grade is that much thinner and this oil gives great protection. Add nulon to the oil and mix before filling so it doesn't settle to the bottom on application.
AnswerID: 42144

Reply By: Eric Experience. - Wednesday, Jan 07, 2004 at 22:47

Wednesday, Jan 07, 2004 at 22:47
Shane.
Don't do it; I remember when this product first came out, Molybond, it was hiped like most new products still are, I was stupid enough to put some in a gear box just before a race, after a few laps I lost all the syncro and the race. The graphite sticks to metal and makes it slipery just like the ad claimed, shame you need friction on you syncro. Eric.
AnswerID: 42147

Reply By: Member - Ross - Wednesday, Jan 07, 2004 at 23:24

Wednesday, Jan 07, 2004 at 23:24
Sounds a bit like banana skins or a pound of mince in an FJ Holden diff.Fidei defensor

Rosco
AnswerID: 42155

Reply By: Member - Jack - Thursday, Jan 08, 2004 at 07:11

Thursday, Jan 08, 2004 at 07:11
Hi Shane.
Not sure I like the graphite idea, for the reasons mentioned in earlier posts.
I have just tried a product that was reviewed in a recent 4WD Monthly, called AW10 (AW = Antiwear).
I bought a 1 litre bottle this week, and added the specified amount to my "notchy" 1991 model 80 series gearbox yesterday. The results were instant. Feels smoother on the change, noticeably less "notchy" (without being completely eliminated, which I was not expecting).
It is not cheap, at $68 for 1 litre, but so far I am more than pleased with the results. Obviously I have no idea on any long term effects.
JackNo trees were harmed in the making or sending of this message.
However a great number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced.
AnswerID: 42183

Follow Up By: chrisfrd - Thursday, Jan 08, 2004 at 09:59

Thursday, Jan 08, 2004 at 09:59
G'day..

I use the Nulon brand one that costs $29 from Supercheap. It did the same thing.

My Nissan ZD-30 box improved instantly, but it is a complete cu*t in the morning.
0
FollowupID: 304647

Reply By: Member - Alan- Thursday, Jan 08, 2004 at 11:20

Thursday, Jan 08, 2004 at 11:20
I used Nulon in the box of the cook's manual Camry. Didn't completely cure it but certainly made an improvement with the changes.
AnswerID: 42201

Reply By: Martyn (WA) - Thursday, Jan 08, 2004 at 14:13

Thursday, Jan 08, 2004 at 14:13
gp.co.au,
It depends how big the bottle is, just putting an additive into anything needs to be a bit more scientific than just adding an additive. In my opinion you are better adding something that already contains the additive you are looking for. Personally I wouldn't put additives in, many of the reasons have been mentioned before. Gearboxes and LSD's need a certain amount of friction to work, making them to slippery won't work either.
Personally I use Royal Purple oil which I've found to be very good, this contains "synerlec" which works whatever it is, I don't know. It's not cheap but in my opinion it works, it's made the gearbox in my Rangie workable, the gearbox also runs cooler due to better heat transfer qualities.
Make sure you take some spare whatever oil you decide do buy, as "sure as god made little green apples" when you need some, the person behind behind the counter in a hick townsite somewhere will look at you like you came from the planet Zod if you ask for anything more than the "normal" stuff. Happened to me recently, I might as well have been speaking Spanish. Keep the shiny side up
AnswerID: 42231

Reply By: redrocket - Thursday, Jan 08, 2004 at 14:34

Thursday, Jan 08, 2004 at 14:34
Hi. I remember my Dad in the late 30's when he was a young man riding a 4 Square aerial and came across a Harley rider who had run out of oil and just about seized his bike. Dad had Colloidal Graphite in his oil. He put a couple of caps full out of his bike, and the Harley rider made it home. No good if you have a filter, it clogs up with the graphite and takes it all out of the oil. I heard just the other day that graphite is now banned, it gets into the skin? Heallth reasons.
I towed a 17 foot Milllard from Canberra to Cairns in the early 80's and being the first long trip and for a year away we took too much. It was very heavy. Towed it with a 5litre Torana LX Hatchback warmed up and over300HP When we got to Cairns the diff was stuffed too much power and too much weight to pull which caused extreme forces on the faces of the teeth of the gears. It caused them to turn blue with heat and even though the diff was full with good oil, the oil close to the gears could'nt make contact with them to cool them down, it just boiled and the damage was described to me that the diff had no oil in it. Similar experiance towing a HQ race car on a aheavy trailer with a VR Club Sport Gearbox gears got so hot oil boiled away from them and blued all the teeth. Fixed the problem with gearbox by putting in a very good synthetic Valvoline light gearbox oil. and just backing off on the power and taking things easier on the transmission when loaded up. Volvos used to use transmission oin in their boxes.
My suggestion is to put in a very good synthetic oil, change regularly, and understand the forces you are putting onto those gears.
Hope my two bobs worth is of some help. Just love to read the forum regards Mark
AnswerID: 42237

Reply By: goingplatinumcomau - Thursday, Jan 08, 2004 at 17:12

Thursday, Jan 08, 2004 at 17:12
Thanks all for the replys
This sure is a Great site and a Good bunch of People

The Truck in question is an old 1985 dihatsue Delta Diesel.............my cost was $00 nuttin rego due and gearbox stuffed ..........however the motor pulls so well in 4 th gear ..................i thought no sence leting a little diesel die for no reason ..........
Am looking at running up to Double Island Point ............to some camping ..........so the salt wont be a concern it has ballon tryes .......
I took it out a mechanic at Samford the truck 4 empty spud bags lol ......sure enough he jacked it up had gear box out in 1/2 hour ...........rolled onto the spud bags .........cold chiesel and hammer and a few bolts later ....he had it pieces ..........be the sort of guy to take around Australia can fix any thing.........Ok so of to rocklea Andersons gearboxes got the cluster gears .....and anutter shaft for well started at $350 and ...settled for $200 :)............bearings seals ect another $100...........so up to $300 ..................+ mechanics cost ...........and trip out the bush to get road worthy.

When he put it back together we put the nulon straight over all the Cogs ............It was my idea to put abit of grafite in as well ..............hey had a bottle so put the lot in and worked it over the cogs with the straight nulon ........added a little oil aas well ........................
Next move is go back to rocklea and get the rear seal houseing i left sitting on the bench :( before she is on the road.
I am some what concerned now after you great people have informed me of the mistake i have made here.
And i do thank you for your help.
Shane
AnswerID: 42256

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