Butane Cylinder in a hot sealed car?

Hi All,

I'm about to embark on a trip from SE Aus to the North; Port Douglas, Darwin, Broome and everywhere in between!

I'm currently tossing around cooking options. I originally thought an inverter and halogen oven might be a good way to go, but my inverter only connects direct to the battery, not the cigarette lighter, so that puts me off, and is probably inefficient use of power, petrol and battery life.

I do have a gas stove, but what are the dangers of carrying around a butane gas cylinder in my subaru outback. I imagine I will be leaving the car in the sun 30 degress heat for hours at a time on some days.

What do you experienced people think?

Thanks in Advance!
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Reply By: Ron N - Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 11:26

Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 11:26
Eager - It's VERY dangerous, and you don't need high temperatures. All gas appliances should be vented to the atmosphere. Just a slight leak in a sealed vehicle, and you'll blow your car up.
There's been several instances in recent years of tradies with gas bottles in vans, that have leaked overnight, and the vans blew up when the remote locking was activated and a spark ignited the gas. At least one bloke was killed as a result. The devastation from a small amount of gas exploding is nothing short of amazing. If you carry a gas bottle, ensure it is carried outside the vehicle or is vented to the atmosphere.

Cheers - Ron.
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Reply By: Mr Pointyhead - Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 11:39

Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 11:39
See

http://www.worksafe.vic.gov.au/wps/wcm/connect/wsinternet/worksafe/home/forms+and+publications/alerts/storing+gas+cylinders+in+vehicles
AnswerID: 486546

Follow Up By: Mr Pointyhead - Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 11:41

Reply By: olcoolone - Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 11:52

Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 11:52
Nice knowing you....

Apart from the chance of an explosion there is also a good chance you will DIE inhaling the gas unknowingly, butane and LPG are heavier then air so if you do inhale it you can not get it out of your lungs.... this can build up over time as in a car journey.

It's called huffing when you do it on purpose and it's called unfortunate when you do it accidentally.
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Reply By: Eager2CAuswithdog - Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 12:04

Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 12:04
Ok thanks guys. You've answered my question. I'm surprised these gas stoves are so popular then.

Anyone got any suggestion of how I could cook on this trip?

Fried eggs on the bonnet?

Thanks :)
AnswerID: 486548

Follow Up By: P2D2 - Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 09:28

Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 09:28
Well the reason they are so popular is because they work and don't give any issues or problems. If you check the butane cylinders from memory they are rated to 50C or even more. Considering the tens of thousands that carry stoves and hundreds of thousands of caravans and motorhomes with gas cylinders accident ratio is minuscule.
With the butane stoves it is advisable to remove the butane canister from the stove, but most dont. I don't but do store the stove when travelling so the canister is correct way up - standing straight up, bottom down.
Best place to buy canisters is BigW for price and importantly the canisters are ISO Butane which is better than Butane in cool weather.

Sadly you will always find the alarmists making a noise. Driving is incredibly dangerous so don't go anywhere and stay at home. Butane gas canisters are the least of your worries travelling if used safely. Considering tens of thousands of back packers a day would use butane canister stoves, when did you least hear of exploding backpackers.
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Follow Up By: Member - Bruce C (NSW) - Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 18:49

Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 18:49
Good reply P2D2. Well measured.

Knew you had it in you to make a positive contribution. Keep up the positive posts. Very welcome.

Exploding backpackers, now there's a thought, LOL.

Cheers, Bruce.
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restless and lost on a track that I know. HL.

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Reply By: member - mazcan - Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 12:16

Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 12:16
hieager 2
this best advice i can give you would be to buy a rooftop box and roof bars to mount it on to suit and carry your gas stove and butane gas cartridges in the RTB they are not sealed tight like a locked vehicle
i have a roof top box i use on my vw golf when i go camping for this reason and there have been no problems
i also lined my rtb with some insulation to reduce the heat factor but it depends on your budget -its up to you
cheers barry
AnswerID: 486550

Reply By: GT Campers - Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 12:19

Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 12:19
E2COWD... is the gas stove you refer to one of the little aerosol ones?

If not, put a roof rack on the Subie to carry your gas bottle

AnswerID: 486551

Reply By: KevL64 - Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 13:40

Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 13:40
I'm a little mystified by the responses above.
If I understand correctly, the canisters you are talking about are the aerosol butane cartridges used in any one of the dozens of brands of single burner stoves?

They are no different to any other aerosol can.They will be no more dangerous in your car than a can of aerogard or deodorant. Please note I used the term "no more dangerous", not "not dangerous at all". Any aerosol can leak or explode under the "right" conditions.

Do people suggest ALL aerosols should be carried in a roof rack?


They in no way present the same risks as a standard gas cylinder due to the use of self sealing valves. Ordinary gas cylinders use hand operated taps/valves that can be bumped and can and will leak. They should never be carried in an enclosed vehicle.

Kev

AnswerID: 486557

Follow Up By: Honky - Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 14:05

Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 14:05
I agree Kev.
The propellant of underarm and even Cooking spray is Butane.
A horrible way to die with exploding gas and oil at least you will not stick to the seat.
I carry the aerosol gas cans in the car with the stove. I would recommend that you do have the Little red cap on for safety though nor leave in direct sunlight.
If they where so dangerous than why are they in box and delivered in enclosed trucks to the stores. Not like gas cylinders.

Honky
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Reply By: get outmore - Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 14:08

Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 14:08
Keep out if direct sunlight and they will be fine. I had a deodorant can go off because it was sitting in direct sunlight.

I always have butane canisters in the 4by no issues
AnswerID: 486558

Follow Up By: Rockape - Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 21:06

Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 21:06
get outmore,

I am with you. I do the same as you and keep them out of the sun and make sure the valves are off and don't leak.





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Reply By: Mick O - Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 14:17

Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 14:17
I may have missed it but I think a key point has been overlooked. Firstly the small butane cylinder stoves allow you to disconnect the butane cylinder when not in use. Even better is to spend a whole 10 seconds removing the cartridge from the stove before packing it away. The cylinders have a small cap to prevent accidental gas release so simply store appropriately, out of the sun and well insulated as I’m sure you’d be able to find ample locations in the vehicle to provide safe stowage.

I’ve carried and used them for years and find them invaluable and a lot easier and safer than carrying a large 4 to 9 kg gas cylinder and gas stove.

Cheers Mick
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trip would doubtless be attended with much hardship.''
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Reply By: Eager2CAuswithdog - Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 14:48

Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 14:48
Um... i hate to mention this at this late stage (though answers above still informative, thanks!) but the stove is actually LP.

:s
AnswerID: 486561

Follow Up By: nowimnumberone - Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 16:01

Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 16:01
Easy if your stove is lpg
Just get one of the $20 butane stoves and some cylinders.
cheers
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Reply By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 16:01

Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 16:01
There is absolutely NO PROBLEM with carrying flammable gas containers, whether refillable cylinders or throwaway canisters, inside a vehicle.............

......UNTIL you get a gas leak, which can and has occurred for any one of a number of reasons. And you have a better chance of getting a gas leak than you have of winning the lottery!

Yep, you have been doing it for years without incident. Been buying lottery tickets too without hitting the jackpot, haven't you? But gambling is such fun, especially with your loved ones.

Experienced?? Well, I have worked on LPG/LNG production and know the efforts we went to in avoiding the risks.

Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Dave(NSW) - Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 16:55

Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 16:55
Here's one that went slightly wrong while cooking in the rear of the car.

Image Could Not Be Found
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 17:17

Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 17:17
Blimey Dave, that LPG cylinder is big enough to power a Chinese Takeaway!
I wouldn't want it inside the car even if it was empty!

Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: garrycol - Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 19:04

Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 19:04
And yet LPG installations for car engines are still fitted to the inside of vehicles where exactly the same issues can occur - authorities seem to think it is OK to have car LPG tanks inside vehicles.

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Follow Up By: Big Woody - Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 05:58

Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 05:58
That photo appears that it is the result of a fire from cooking in the rear of the vehicle rather than an explosion from a leaking gas cylinder.
I cannot see any evidence of an explosion.

BW
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Follow Up By: Dave(NSW) - Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 09:57

Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 09:57
Yeah apparantly it was a cooking fire, the hose had a small leak then caught on fire. Just goes to show how things can go wrong very quickly.
Cheers Dave.
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Reply By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 16:15

Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 16:15
Hi Eager, aside from the LPG hazard aspect, halogen ovens typically consume 1300 Watts and with the inefficiency factor of an inverter you would be drawing some 120 Amps from your battery. So apart from the purchase cost of a 1500W inverter, you would need a good-sized battery and charging system.

Cooking with electricity is simply not a practical option for camping.

Cheers
Allan

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Reply By: The Landy - Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 16:34

Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 16:34
What about a Coleman Dual burner stove, set you back a couple of hundred dollars, works perfectly and uses unleaded fuel...

Enjoy your trip...

AnswerID: 486570

Follow Up By: Bushranger1 - Friday, May 25, 2012 at 14:36

Friday, May 25, 2012 at 14:36
I will second that.

Used a 2 burner for 20 years for car based camping & a small single burner for backpacking. Used my 2 burner for 2 yrs every day on my Round Australia trip. Run some injector cleaner in the fuel & rarely have to change the generator.
I don't carry gas at all.

Cheers
Stu
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Follow Up By: Eager2CAuswithdog - Friday, May 25, 2012 at 15:01

Friday, May 25, 2012 at 15:01
I bought one this morning, on special :)

How easy is it to find shellite in the outback?
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Follow Up By: Bushranger1 - Friday, May 25, 2012 at 16:15

Friday, May 25, 2012 at 16:15
Some hardware shops sell it.

I use it for my job & buy it at Bunnings but like I sais I mostly use Unleaded in my fuel stove as the Shellite is around $27.00 for 4 litres at Bunnings so petrol is much cheaper if you are using your stove a lot.
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Reply By: Honky - Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 16:39

Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 16:39
You could always get a Coleman Duel fuel stove as they are designed to get hot anyway.
Just carry the fuel outside the car.

Honky
AnswerID: 486572

Follow Up By: Eager2CAuswithdog - Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 10:27

Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 10:27
Thanks Honky.

Its still not simple to carry fuel outside the car as I don't have a roof rack.

I do have rails and bars.

Wouldn't it still be an issue if there was direct sunlight on the roof all day?
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Reply By: Whirlwinder - Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 18:36

Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 18:36
No, don't carry butane gas cans inside your vehicle. It is just asking for trouble when it is so easy to carry them outside on the roof.
We have a Coleman dual fuel stove and it is great, better than LPG for cooking and you don't have to carry those big mother cylinders just 4 litres of ULP outside the car.
It is a little more fiddling to get set up but who cares. You are on holiday anyway.
The reason I won't carry LPG or butane inside is that I lost a young friend to a LPG explosion in his Hiace van in about 1994. It literally blew him to pieces and nearly killed his younger brother. It is too easy to put it outside!!
Ian
AnswerID: 486582

Follow Up By: Eager2CAuswithdog - Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 10:31

Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 10:31
Thanks Whirlwinder,

How would you suggest I carry 4 litres of fuel outside the car with roof bars and rails? Would I need a rack?

Is it safe to carry fuel on the roof, if it is in the sun all day?

There should be an invention where I can get just a small amount needed for cooking out of the cars petrol tank! :)
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Reply By: Eager2CAuswithdog - Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 19:03

Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 19:03
Yes I'm definitely talked out of carrying gas inside the car. I'd rather live on tins of tuna for 3 months. Though that might lead to mercury poisoning.. :)

Carrying petrol on the roof isn't too appealing to me. I've had so many costs I hadn't thought of already and although I do have a rails on the roof of the Subby (both ways) I don't have a rack and I'm guessing they are not cheap, not to mention another stove. Also, I'm thinking that would be costly on fuel economy over a 13,000 km trip?

Another suggestion I've been given was to get a separate battery, deep cycle/truck size and use the inverter off that (i've already got a 1500W/3000 modified sine wave one) , and recharge it when I stop at powered site/motel etc.

Is that a good/workable plan?

As well as cooking I was also hoping to recharge my laptop battery.

Thanks!!
AnswerID: 486587

Follow Up By: garrycol - Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 21:47

Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 21:47
Put the cylinder in something like a milk crate so that the valve cannot be knocked - tie the crate down and tie the cylinder to the crate. Ensure the valve is in good nick - replace the seals. Drive with ventilation on.

If you can, when stopped leave a window or two open and crack the rear tailgate open - most of the issues have been addressed - take measures to counteract them.
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FollowupID: 761854

Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 22:03

Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 22:03
Garrycol you are kidding yourself.

Firstly, the valves are all metal-to-metal seats. Replaceable seals exist only on the valve stem and only come into play when the valve is open. Sure, they need to be in good condition for when the cylinder is connected and in use but play no part when in storage or transit.

Secondly, leaving a window open will not avoid heavier-than-air LPG vapour collecting in the lower parts of the body interior. These proposed measures do not address the hazard.

Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: garrycol - Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 10:40

Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 10:40
Well given he doesn't have a trailer or a roof rack and is not getting one how do you propose he get around the issue. Fixed LPG tanks are fitted inside cars to power the engine and while they are a different system they also have the possibility of leaking - authorities allow these tank to be fitted and do not seem to have issues with it (is tested once a year though).

There is no real issue in carrying gas bottles inside if precautions are taken - you have your view -I disagree.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 10:58

Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 10:58
Given that his vehicle already has roof rails it would be reasonably simple and economical to add a suitable rack or pod.

Fixed LPG tanks are not "fitted inside cars". They are isolated such that vapours cannot enter or reside within the vehicle. Here is an extract from some legislation . . ".....it must be so constructed that any gas which might leak from any fittings cannot pass into any other enclosed space such as passenger and luggage compartments."

Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: garrycol - Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 19:05

Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 19:05
Sorry mate - plenty of 4wd vehicles have lpg tanks fitted in their cargo areas that are also inside the cabin area - all legal.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 21:32

Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 21:32
Certainly, part of the cylinder wall may appear within the passenger or luggage compartment but the section incorporating the valves and connections is isolated. Read again the legislation extract above. It's there in black & white. You can't just reshape it to suit your purpose. Any vehicle not conforming to that legislation and specifications is illegal.

Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: garrycol - Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 22:59

Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 22:59
If you say so.

But not in the case of my own vehicle - all tank controls are inside the vehicle - all plumbing into and out of the tank is inside the vehicle, the fuel shutoff valve is inside the vehicle.

My vehicle is tested each year and passes and the installation has all the relevant compliance plates.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Friday, May 25, 2012 at 07:26

Friday, May 25, 2012 at 07:26
Garrycol, I'm dumbfounded (or maybe just plain dumb!). I wonder if that legislation is old, recent or state specific. I'll look it up again. How old is your installation?

Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: garrycol - Friday, May 25, 2012 at 11:25

Friday, May 25, 2012 at 11:25
An earlier conversion.

Have a look at these
Disco LPG Link

Another Disco LPG
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Reply By: Member - Josh- Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 22:48

Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at 22:48
I think from the responses here so far the answer is yes, no,yes, maybe, don't know, yes, should've, could've, would've, make up your own mind!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
We spent 3 yrs on the road full time. We had a small single burner butane gas stove tucked away in one of our drawers with 3 spare cylinders wrapped up in a cloth beside it. It was our emergancy cooking back up. Never had a problem, if we did I wouldn't be here now!!...
People have suggested placing them on the roof instead. I don't see how that is any better. On a 30 degree day, go sit on your roof in direct sunlight. No thanks.
They sell thousands of these burner stoves every week and I have never heard of one going off. I have heard of gas cylinders for the car going off or acetylene bottles but never a small butane bottle.
Does anyone on here know 1st hand of one of these small bottles going bang??

Josh
AnswerID: 486611

Follow Up By: get outmore - Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 02:55

Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 02:55
not one of those links refers to the safety of the butane canisters

most of them talk of the need to use the stove correctly and the other one - I dont know where it was from but it refered to butane cylinders that need to be pierced to be used
- never seen them in Australia
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Follow Up By: Member - Josh- Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 22:48

Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 22:48
Thanks Ron, Your links reinforce my point. Most of those are over seas and refere to people not using them properly. The one in Tassie I can't open so not sure what it referes to. The one from EO says it was unattended when it exploded so no one knows why it exploded. Not one those refere to storage of cylinders or are first hand as I asked "Does anyone on here know 1st hand of one of these small bottles going bang?? "..
You can't say these cylinders are unsafe if people aren't using them properly, it's the people that are unsafe in that case not the cylinder.

Josh
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Follow Up By: Ron N - Friday, May 25, 2012 at 00:09

Friday, May 25, 2012 at 00:09
Josh - Yes, the majority of the butane stove accidents were related to incorrect gas canister installation, or incorrect use of the stove.
Using the trivet upside down (which was outlined as the cause of the two incidents in the Tassie WorkCover alert) and using an excessively large pot that reflected the heat back down onto the gas canister, were the main causes of the butane stove explosions.
A couple of stove or canister accidents were unexplained.

The bottom line is, though, that all permanent gas installations are required to be vented to the atmosphere, anywhere there's a possible leak. This is to ensure total safety.
The butane canisters are essentially an uncontrolled, lightweight construction, highly flammable gas container, located in your vehicle - and they have no design features that ensures any gas leak is vented to the atmosphere, as with permanent gas installations.

Thus, YOU may have travelled many kms carrying butane canisters inside your vehicle, with no problems - but that's not to say that there's virtually no risk in doing so.
All it takes is a sharp item to puncture the canister and you have a gas leak.
You obviously took care in storage and packing of the stove and canister/s - but this is not necessarily the case with all stove owners - and I'll wager the stove instructions do not cover or even mention any safety measures associated with carrying the canisters in vehicles.

It's probably only sheer luck that there isn't a number of reported explosions, fires or gas leak incidents, from carrying butane containers inside a vehicle - and in fact there may have been a number, that have not been reported.
If someone loses a vehicle to a fire, and no-one is hurt, then that incident usually isn't reported to authorities - and more so, if it's in a remote area.

Cheers - Ron.
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Reply By: Eager2CAuswithdog - Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 05:03

Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 05:03
Any thoughts on the separate deep cycle truck battery idea?
AnswerID: 486617

Follow Up By: P2D2 - Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 09:36

Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 09:36
Your Subaru would die with the weight of the battery and charger needed to power a halogen oven. Other issue you couldn't afford the battery or charger needed LOL
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Reply By: SDG - Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 09:18

Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 09:18
Your damned if you do, and damned if you don't.
I have travelled in the car for almost twenty years with one.(not any more) Yes it can explode, but so can the 60+litres of fuel your sitting on. Both rare, but when it happens it is known about real quick via the news.
Batteries in cars can explode if leaking and a spark is present.
We drive potential bombs

Generally accidents would occur from a fault in the product, or even something as simple as the valve not being turned off.


How many of you store bottles, jerry cans of fuel, etc in their shed? They can get hot. I would hate to be a fireman near a shed fire.

I had an aerosoll gas canister go boom once on my bike trailer, so even those are not fool proof

Common sence is required no matter what you do, and accept the consequences for each and every mishap.

Remember your the driver/owner of the vehicle, or appliance. The ultimate decision is yours, and the buck stops with you
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 10:47

Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 10:47
SDG, it's called Risk Management. A principal tool of hazardous industries.

It may not be possible to eliminate all the risks but it is possible to minimise them.
Some people learn it early..... a child picking up a hot object.
Others learn it a bit later...... in that final microsecond as their van full of flammable gas explodes! It can sometimes be too late to accept the consequences.

Just because we are surrounded by hazards need not mean it is appropriate to shrug the shoulders and say "Ah, duz'nt matter, when my number's up.......etc". Especially when we have the responsibility to family members and others.

Yes, there are LPG cylinders and petrol jerries in my shed, but they are certainly not under my house..... the risk is being managed.

A fundamental reasoning of Risk Management is to avoid risks that are avoidable. And I would believe that carrying such as LPG in a closed vehicle is avoidable and therefore should be avoided. As you say, it is common sense.

Cheers
Allan

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Reply By: Ron N - Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 11:15

Thursday, May 24, 2012 at 11:15
SDG - The laddie asked about the risks involved in carrying butane stove canisters in a sealed car, and the largest number of contributors have advised it's an unsafe practice.

Not for nothing is butane recognised as a hazardous load, is listed under the Dangerous Goods Act, and has a UN Hazmat code (over 500ml containers).
It's not helped by the fact that many butane stoves are produced with poor QC in places such as China and South Korea. It's not helped again by the fact that the butane canister stoves require exceptional care in setting up and in use.

Gas leaks are usually only found when an explosion occurs, and the numbers of people seriously injured by these stoves and canisters world-wide, is enough for safety authorities to issue regular alerts.

Yes, petrol, batteries and LPG vehicles all pose risks, but these products and their delivery setups are all built to completely minimise risk to the user. Risk to users of butane cartridge stoves is far higher than any other fuel/power system.


Eager - As you have no way of storing gas canisters or bottles outside your car, and no method of storing them inside, in a vented compartment - if I were you, I'd be looking at using a simple kerosene stove.

The old pump-up kerosene stoves have been in use since WW1 and are a proven, reliable, and virtually trouble free, cooking/heating operation.
Small amounts of Lighting Kerosene are readily available in any hardware store, and can be safely stored in a sealed car. If the kerosene leaks, you can smell it, and kerosene leaks don't pose the high danger of a butane or LPG leak.

Have a look on eBay for "kerosene stoves", and examine the Swedish Optimus stove that is available for sale there. These are military stoves built to a high level of QC and are very effective. The only thing you need to take care with on these stoves, is keeping the fuel clean, and occasionally cleaning the nozzle with the pricker tool provided.

Cheers - Ron.
AnswerID: 486634

Reply By: Eager2CAuswithdog - Friday, May 25, 2012 at 07:27

Friday, May 25, 2012 at 07:27
Looks as though Im off to get the Coleman dual fuel stove this morning. Im going to buy a good quality jerry can and carry a few litres of shellite inside the car, being careful to keep it out of the sun and opening the lid to release any pressure regularly.

Will also get a siphon hand pump thing in case i run out of white gas i can use ulp.

Sound ok?
AnswerID: 486717

Follow Up By: Member - Boobook - Friday, May 25, 2012 at 08:32

Friday, May 25, 2012 at 08:32
Good on you.

I hope your stove is no where near as hazardous as this site.

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Follow Up By: Bushranger1 - Friday, May 25, 2012 at 14:43

Friday, May 25, 2012 at 14:43
See my post above.

Much cheaper to run unleaded with a bit of injector cleaner. Shellite gets a bit expensive. The Dual fuel stoves are a bit fiddly to use at first but run with it as they are great once you get used to them. Been using mine for 20 yrs.

Cheers
Stu

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