Special dietary requirements when travelling

Submitted: Friday, May 25, 2012 at 12:04
ThreadID: 95801 Views:1980 Replies:11 FollowUps:10
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The bride threw me a curly one last night! We were discussing our August trip and she asked me where she would be purchasing her lactose free milk = she is lactose and gluten intolerant. In past travels this has not been a problem because we were rarely away from civilisation for more than 2 weeks including the Kimberley and Cape York. This trip we plan to spend something like 2 months between Darwin and Cairns mainly along the Gulf.

There are precious few places that sell gluten free and lactose free supplies along this stretch I would imagine. I assume the only real option is to carry long life milk and bake gluten free.

I was wondering if there are others out there that have a better solution or can tell me if I'm wrong - I've been wrong before! We would consume about 1 litre per day and that would mean carrying 60 litres of milk - I'll need another long range tank for sure.

Kind regards
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Reply By: Berniec - Friday, May 25, 2012 at 14:08

Friday, May 25, 2012 at 14:08
We are in the same situation and have found that it is not too difficult. Gluten free and lactose free results in a lot of "meat and three veg" meals which suits my style of camping. We also take a bread maker and knock up a fresh loaf about once a week using the GF bread mixes.
When traveling away from home for a long time we take a lot of dried food. Peas, beans etc aren't too bad and the freezer keeps a couple of weeks of meat. Powdered mashed potato has milk solids so that's out. We also prepare a lot of dried food including pumpkin, tomato and fruits.
As far as lactose free milk goes, the only solution we have is UHT soy milk (check the labels because some have barley in them) and we stock up and purchase as we find it. It is a lot better now then it used to be. Whether you take a jerry can of water or a couple of boxes of soy milk, the weight is about the same. You just cant fill up when you find a watering hole so the lactose free milk is quarantined for the one who needs it.
As only one of us is Gluten free we also take powdered milk so that reduces the daily soy use. We also take nuts and snackbars. Again you have to read the labels.
Hope you have a great trip across the top - it is well worth it.
AnswerID: 486758

Follow Up By: Member - Beatit (QLD) - Saturday, May 26, 2012 at 19:28

Saturday, May 26, 2012 at 19:28
Thanks Berniec,

At this stage it does look like a a couple of boxes of milk. We will check out our local health food supplier for powdered versions.

Kind regards

Theo
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Reply By: Member - DickyBeach - Friday, May 25, 2012 at 14:30

Friday, May 25, 2012 at 14:30
Before you set off on your trip please be sure to update your blog about your new Expedition Vehicle.

AnswerID: 486760

Follow Up By: Member - Beatit (QLD) - Saturday, May 26, 2012 at 19:32

Saturday, May 26, 2012 at 19:32
Hi DB,

I'm a bit tardy I know but will get to the blog soon. Here's a photo of the finished vehicle.

Image Could Not Be Found

Kind regards

Theo

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FollowupID: 762056

Reply By: Member - Keith Berg - Friday, May 25, 2012 at 16:29

Friday, May 25, 2012 at 16:29
You can buy the Lactase enzyme at most chemists, which replaces the enzyme that your bride is lacking. This means that she should be able to have conventional milk products if she wants, although you may have to get some advice from your Doc first. I think it comes in tablet form.
http://www.lacteeze.com.au/
AnswerID: 486770

Follow Up By: Member - Beatit (QLD) - Saturday, May 26, 2012 at 19:35

Saturday, May 26, 2012 at 19:35
G'day Keith,

Thanks for that, we have tried that before but found that it requires 24 hours to activate and a lot of the milk we were buying on the road was frozen. We will take some along just in case.

Kind regards

Theo
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FollowupID: 762057

Reply By: Motherhen - Friday, May 25, 2012 at 17:44

Friday, May 25, 2012 at 17:44
Hi Beatit

Making you own bread seems the only real option for the bread. I know it can be made successfully with a bread maker, but i have not tried making gluten free by hand either. Using a breadmaker from an inverter (even if only for the initial mixing stage) is feasible off an inverter with good solar and batteries. How would bride feel about eating substitutes rice crackers (you know, the round things that look like they are made out of bean bag filling :O) for a while?

Can you get lactose free milk in UHT? We use long life milk but have no special dietary requirements, and can carry up 30 or so litres easily which lasts as a month - but as you say, two months would be harder to pack. Can your bride cut down on milk use in difficult stretches? I have also not seen lactose free in powdered milk, but maybe it is available from health shops? We carry powered milk for all cook needs, using fresh or UHT only for coffee, tea and breakfast cereal, and resorting to powered when we run out.

I do hope you can get it all worked out to do those great trips you have planned.

Motherhen
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AnswerID: 486774

Follow Up By: Member - Beatit (QLD) - Saturday, May 26, 2012 at 19:43

Saturday, May 26, 2012 at 19:43
Hi Motherhen,

The bride has not had a lot of luck with the GF bread mixes in the bread maker, they never turned out well. She has had more luck mixing and baking the stuff but she hates fires (did I say she is special). I'm now going to try it in our baby Q so we'll see.

The powdered milk is a good option but I have space to pack a lot of milk in need. Certainly is different to anything we had to provide for in past trips. We will work it out don't you worry about that.

All the best and kind regards

Theo
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Reply By: Motherhen - Friday, May 25, 2012 at 21:56

Friday, May 25, 2012 at 21:56
Hi Beatit

Making you own bread seems the only real option for the bread. I know it can be made successfully with a bread maker, but i have not tried making gluten free by hand either. Using a breadmaker from an inverter (even if only for the initial mixing stage) is feasible off an inverter with good solar and batteries. How would bride feel about eating substitutes such as rice crackers (you know, the round things that look like they are made out of bean bag filling :O) for a while?

Can you get lactose free milk in UHT? We use long life milk but have no special dietary requirements, and we can carry up 30 or so litres easily which lasts us a month or so - but as you say, two month's supply would be harder to pack. Can your bride cut down on milk used in difficult stretches? I have also not seen lactose free in powdered milk, but maybe it is available from health shops? We carry powered milk for all cooking needs, using fresh or UHT only for coffee, tea and breakfast cereal, and resorting to powered for the tea and coffee only if we run out of fresh/UHT.

I do hope you can get it all worked out to enjoy that great trip you have planned.

Motherhen
Motherhen

Red desert dreaming

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AnswerID: 486777

Reply By: Member - Alan H (QLD) - Saturday, May 26, 2012 at 08:09

Saturday, May 26, 2012 at 08:09
Theo

We are in the same situation!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

For milk we use "liddells" Lactose free Milk (low fat) and find that it is readily available at any size shop. We take a heap from home and keep topping up the supply as we pass large towns.

It is available across the major town of the Kimberley and even at Bamaga.

As stated above, meat and three veg is very much the go. We do take gluten free bread in the freezer and top that up if and when we find it. (harder to find than milk) else rice crackers or other dry biscuits etc substitute for bread.

We have not been very successful at baking our own gluten free bread. It turns into cake.

Getting supplies of milk and bread are much better than they used to be. We had no problems on a recent trip around the country but several years ago it used to be a big pain....

Cheers

Safe travels

Alan
AnswerID: 486800

Follow Up By: Member - Beatit (QLD) - Saturday, May 26, 2012 at 19:48

Saturday, May 26, 2012 at 19:48
G'day Alan,

Missing the MOG? I am hahahaha. Thanks we have noticed that it is not only getting easier to get these products but also the range and quality have improved out of sight.

Any trips planned?

Kind regards

Theo
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Reply By: ljsroslyn - Saturday, May 26, 2012 at 08:36

Saturday, May 26, 2012 at 08:36
Having been in the same situation I understand what you mean. Apart from all of the other suggestions, GF wraps are a good substitute for bread. They usually have a long life, pack flat and can be used various ways - sandwhiches, pizzas, burritos etc. I never travelled without them - a bit like cardboard to eat but great when you can't get bread. Cheers
AnswerID: 486802

Follow Up By: Member - Beatit (QLD) - Saturday, May 26, 2012 at 19:50

Saturday, May 26, 2012 at 19:50
Thanks ljsroslyn,

I think we'll pack some for back up

Kind regards

Theo
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FollowupID: 762062

Reply By: The Bantam - Saturday, May 26, 2012 at 18:14

Saturday, May 26, 2012 at 18:14
Serioulsy folks if you are thinking of making bread, forget the bread maker...its not that hard.

We had a loan of a bread maker, what a fidle......I could have bread mixed, neaded and baked faster and with less cleaning up.

Make bread any time you have a fire, and do it in ya camp oven...how do you think our predecessors survived.

as a sperate issue.

They are finding that a large persentage of Aboriginal people like the Asians are either lactose or gluten intolerant.....well so they recon....hell only 200 years ago they had not had milk or wheat flour, europeans have had thousands of years to adapt to wheat and cows milk.....so its surprising where you will find lactose and gluten free stuff.

Only a few yaers ago it was hard to find in big cities...these days that sort of stuff is any any half decent supermarket.

cheers
AnswerID: 486830

Follow Up By: Member - Beatit (QLD) - Saturday, May 26, 2012 at 19:58

Saturday, May 26, 2012 at 19:58
G'day Bantam,

If i took thspecial needle e breadmaker I'd probably have to leave MY coffee machine behind not sure I'm ready for that.

Don't if it good or bad news but it may mean a ready supply in the community towns. We had a similar experience when travelling with a type one diabetic a few years ago. Apparently this is also more common in communities so we were able to replace a special needle medication in Weipa.

Thanks and kind regards

Theo
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FollowupID: 762063

Follow Up By: Member - Beatit (QLD) - Saturday, May 26, 2012 at 19:59

Saturday, May 26, 2012 at 19:59
Not sure what happened, it should read,

If i took the breadmaker I'd probably............
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FollowupID: 762064

Reply By: Member - Alan H (QLD) - Sunday, May 27, 2012 at 09:09

Sunday, May 27, 2012 at 09:09
Hi Theo

No, I miss the interaction with people but not work as such. Stress levels are down and life is not so time dependant. Especially don't miss having to do everything by yesterday.

Now I can do what i have to do Today , tomorrow or some time?????

About to head off to Canberra. That will test the insulation etc.

Going to USA later in the year.

Your vehicle certainly looks the part as does your van so safe and trouble free travelling. Keep the speed down and tyres soft to avoid battery trouble etc.

Cheers

Alan
AnswerID: 486872

Reply By: Member - Joe n Mel n kids (FNQ - Sunday, May 27, 2012 at 16:38

Sunday, May 27, 2012 at 16:38
Hi guys, got your message, i dont carry it at the moment but will get some in, it will have to be "long life" that is all as we simply cant carry fresh milks, takes a few days just to get it here ...
When are you hoping to be here ????
Cheers
Joe
AnswerID: 486906

Follow Up By: Member - Beatit (QLD) - Sunday, May 27, 2012 at 17:42

Sunday, May 27, 2012 at 17:42
Hi Joe,

Thanks for the response. And I really appreciate the offer, not exactly sure when we'll get there but we plan to leave home for Darwin beginning August. We'd be guessing somewhere around middle September. I was hoping to get something like 20 litres of long life lactose free milk but I'm not sure how it comes to you. There are a couple of different brands but any one of them would do.

Kind regards

Theo
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FollowupID: 762131

Reply By: Member - Joe n Mel n kids (FNQ - Thursday, Jun 07, 2012 at 19:02

Thursday, Jun 07, 2012 at 19:02
Hi again,
We may have found a long life product that may suit, it is Pauls Zymil, we were hoping to get some this week but it was not in stock at our suppliers ......
I will find out some more tomorrow and keep in contact .......
Should have it in stock by July and will carry it as a stock line....
Cheers
Joe
AnswerID: 487872

Follow Up By: Member - Beatit (QLD) - Friday, Jun 15, 2012 at 21:24

Friday, Jun 15, 2012 at 21:24
Hi Joe,

Sorry for the delayed response, thanks for that and Zymil is just fine. We are getting a little excited about the trip and I'm looking forward to saying g'day when we call. Thanks again.

Kind regards

Theo
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FollowupID: 763740

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