Fishermen: Can you recommend premium quality knife set

Submitted: Monday, May 28, 2012 at 20:28
ThreadID: 95869 Views:6457 Replies:6 FollowUps:14
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Asking help from all those fishermen and fisherladies out there. I am wanting to purchase a fishing knife set / filleting knife for a gift but want it to be the most excellent quality one can buy. It's a special gift!!

I have done a "google" search and can only come up with sets around $45 - which tell me straight away that this is not the premium quality I am after. I expect to pay $100 or more for 1 knife.

Can anyone recommend an Australian supplier/retailer of premium quality fishing knives or filleting knives - or am I best to head to a chef supply store and just buy a chef's filleting knife?

Thanks in advance!
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Reply By: Bigfish - Monday, May 28, 2012 at 20:33

Monday, May 28, 2012 at 20:33
I purchased 2 Buck filleting knives about 4 years ago. Still have em and they are still cutting ever so sharply. Only about $50.00 each. A good steel and a lot of care and these knives will out last you. They have cleaned hundreds of barra and golden snapper. I have about a dozen other different knives , all good quality. These are the best filleting knives I have used as not only a reasonable price but good steel. Good handles as well.
Depending on your fish species it pays to have 2 different lengths of blade.
Why not buy the knife, a good steel and maybe a diamond stone for about $150.. and it would make a great gift for any angler.
cheers and good hunting
AnswerID: 487041

Follow Up By: Bigfish - Monday, May 28, 2012 at 20:36

Monday, May 28, 2012 at 20:36
There is a chap down in Tasmania , Hobart who does a good deal...e-bay is your friend. Google "buck fillet knife" and see what you think.
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Reply By: bazz - Monday, May 28, 2012 at 21:28

Monday, May 28, 2012 at 21:28
hi, Victorinox knives are good qaulity and reasonably priced, a lot of butchers use them, MBL in Adelaide , their web site has filleting knives at good prices, you need to keep it sharp tho so a good stone and steel is needed as well, store sharp knives in protective sheath/ pouch DON"T store in draw with other knives.

This web site is a good read on knife sharpening , scroll down

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?/topic/26036-knife-maintenance-and-sharpenin...
Barry
ex Butcher /Meat inspector.
AnswerID: 487048

Follow Up By: Gnomey - Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 00:01

Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 00:01
Mate, I'm with Bazz. Can't go past a butcher's experience with knives. Most of my mine are Victorinox including the poly handled boning knife I use to fillet fish. But that's not exactly what you were asking about. Very functional, take and hold an edge well, but maybe not flash enough for the situation.

These guys in Canada make seriously nice knives and there are online sellers in Oz. No personal experience with their fillet knives but I know people with the DH Russell belt knife - a classic for hunters. Hint.
Grohmann Knives

Cheers
Mark
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Follow Up By: Bigfish - Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 07:49

Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 07:49
Excellent piece of info there Bazz. Everyone should copy and note. We all use knives. Its just that some respect them whilst others havent got a clue and always whinge about crappy cutting when in fact , armed with a little knowledge they could make the task of cutting a lot easier.
cheers
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Follow Up By: Road to Discovery - Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 21:18

Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 21:18
Oooh, I like those Grohmann knives. Thanks Mark.
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Follow Up By: get outmore - Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 22:12

Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 22:12
another vote for MBL

I assume they are in most citys, ive been to the one in Adelaide and in perth although its since movedc from Vic Park
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Follow Up By: get outmore - Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 22:14

Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 22:14
oh and you would be surprised at what you might find there.

thinking its only butchers that shop there is like thinking only an accountant would shop at officeworks
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Reply By: Bill BD - Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 06:39

Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 06:39
I think you might have to seperate out your filleting knives from actual fishing knife. For cutting up bait and the like most fishers use a cheap knife that is easy to get an edge on. They get too much bad treatment and are easy to lose, so don't warrant a premium knife. However, knives for filleting and slicing are a different story. You can go Japanese... they have traditional fish knives that are excellent and up in the price range you are talking about. A premium sashimi knife will set you back a bit. There is even different knives for flat fish. There is all the various chef gear, which is also right up there.... Wusthof comes to mind. We have a Wusthof kitchen set that cost about $500.... good knives. Ideally you need a specialist filleting knife, and one or two slicing knives (depending on what you do with your fish).

If you wanted my vote I would love a few good Japanese knives in a traditional roll. They don't look pretty though.
AnswerID: 487068

Follow Up By: Bill BD - Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 07:04

Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 07:04
Not really what you want, unless the fisher catches big fish, but I couldn't resist posting this pic of a set of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Oroshi_hocho_knives.jpg

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Follow Up By: Bill BD - Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 09:13

Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 09:13
Rats, the link didn't work.
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Follow Up By: Member - Ed C (QLD) - Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 09:32

Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 09:32
Didja mean this one ???? >>

Oroshi hocho knives

;-))

Confucius say.....
"He who lie underneath automobile with tool in hand,
....Not necessarily mechanic!!"

Member
My Profile  Send Message

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FollowupID: 762320

Follow Up By: Bill BD - Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 12:01

Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 12:01
That's the one Ed. Now that's a set of fish knives!
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Follow Up By: Road to Discovery - Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 21:05

Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 21:05
What amazing knives! I was thinking of checking out Tatsuya's range too. Almost look scary in an evil "dont cross me in a dark alley" kind of way, tho. But I guess there can be no better experts on fish than the Japanese.
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Follow Up By: Road to Discovery - Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 21:08

Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 21:08
I'm with you on the Wusthofs!! That's what's in my kitchen. I've had my chef's knife kit for 21 years and still going like brand new.
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Follow Up By: Bill BD - Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 22:44

Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 22:44
I would like to try one of the japanese knives that have one flat side for filleting and skinning as I think you could skim the flat edge along the bone with them. Have to get a left hand one though.
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Reply By: Member - John Baas (WA) - Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 20:35

Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 20:35
I love my Warthers'. Only I get to touch it!

Warthers Filleting Knives

Cheers.
AnswerID: 487124

Follow Up By: Road to Discovery - Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 20:58

Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 20:58
Oooh, they're pretty! Nice workmanship. Thanks for the link.
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Reply By: Muntoo - Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 21:20

Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 21:20
All the professional barra netters up here use Dexter Russell.

I sepnt a week with one of them once, and watching him work his knives and filleting fish was amazing. And im talking fish that goes to the best restaraunts in Oz.

He swore by them, and had been using the same knives for over 10 years. In a week he generally filled 200 boxes of 15kg fillets. Lots of use, and hardly require any attention.

I use them too now.
AnswerID: 487126

Reply By: Road to Discovery - Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 21:41

Tuesday, May 29, 2012 at 21:41
Hey fishing Gurus! Thanks heaps to you all for responding.

Thanks Big Fish for recommending different sizes for filleting different fish. I had not considered that.

Also, thanks Bill BD for reminding me that fishing is more than just the final act of presentation, but that chopping up bait is also part of the ritual.

I understand that the poly handles are non porous and make sense for fish, but gee, those speciality timber handles are more the 'keep treasured forever' type of thing I was after.

My husband received a beautiful set of knives 20 years ago as a gift for being 'best man' at a friend's wedding. We have both loved this set dearly (I get to use it for the occasional boning and filleting in the kitchen...when I'm lucky). It is a Kershaw Blade Trader set, couldn't believe it when I found the exact set still for sale today, tho at a much lesser price than I would have valued this set at. My husband's set contains a fillet knife, boning knife and saw blade, and 20 years on it is still the most sharpest and deadliest knives we have (even comparing to my Wusthofs). My husband sliced the end of his finger off once - gosh it bled!!

Anyway, based on all your very helpful comments, I am now considering a fishing set that consists of 2 fillet knives, a boner and a "just chop up the bait" kind of knife? Would that make a very nice gift for my nephew? Is it worth getting them engraved, or is that overkill for a bloke?

AnswerID: 487131

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