Nissan Navara 500 Wheels interchangeability with Toyota 200

Submitted: Tuesday, Jun 05, 2012 at 07:03
ThreadID: 96033 Views:3571 Replies:6 FollowUps:5
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Hi ..... Does anybody know how to address the Navara wheel interchangeably issue. I have a 2011 Nissan Navara V6 550 with 17 inch wheels and have been looking at buying a second hand Kimberley Karavan. I am told that you cannot swap the wheels in case of emergency which means that you have to carry 4 spares. 2 for the Nissan and 2 for the Karavan.

Wheel manufacturers have been less than helpful.

Best regards

POB

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Reply By: olcoolone - Tuesday, Jun 05, 2012 at 08:13

Tuesday, Jun 05, 2012 at 08:13
I thought the Navara wheels were 6 stub and the 200 series 5 stud....... 5 into 6 doesn't go well.

Why do you need so many spares?
AnswerID: 487664

Reply By: GT Campers - Tuesday, Jun 05, 2012 at 08:47

Tuesday, Jun 05, 2012 at 08:47
The simple answer is: don't buy a vehicle with an orphan stud pattern... but a stud pattern change on the KK (if it is possible) will enable you to share spares

Co-incidentally, I am investigating this very plight for a customer right now, I will let you know what the outcome is, or call me


AnswerID: 487671

Reply By: Rangiephil - Tuesday, Jun 05, 2012 at 09:00

Tuesday, Jun 05, 2012 at 09:00
The answer is that you have the trailer hubs redrilled for Navara stud pattern.

If there is not enough room to redrill, you get blank hubs and have them drilled and studded.
The only caveat here is that the offsets must be reasonably compatable so that the tyres clear the guards on the trailer.

I have done this with a Camp'o'matic to fit Range Rover mags instead of old Toyota pattern.
Regards Philip A


AnswerID: 487672

Reply By: Member - Andrew W14 - Tuesday, Jun 05, 2012 at 09:44

Tuesday, Jun 05, 2012 at 09:44
i had my van made with VC air and 5 stud wheels to match the Navara i had. Then changed vehicles to a LC with 6 stud pattern.

VC offered to change over to new stud pattern for the bargain price of $4,000!

I now run with one spare for each, a good compressor and ARB's repair kit and a prayer each time we go away!
AnswerID: 487680

Follow Up By: Member - Andrew W14 - Tuesday, Jun 05, 2012 at 09:45

Tuesday, Jun 05, 2012 at 09:45
oops - Numbers 5 and 6 mixed up!
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FollowupID: 762937

Follow Up By: GT Campers - Tuesday, Jun 05, 2012 at 11:21

Tuesday, Jun 05, 2012 at 11:21
Um... Andrew.. that's not the only mix-up.... $4000? Is there an extra '0' there?

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FollowupID: 762945

Follow Up By: Member - Andrew W14 - Tuesday, Jun 05, 2012 at 15:09

Tuesday, Jun 05, 2012 at 15:09
That was price quoted by van manufacturer, but he must have had rocks in his head as VC have quoted $900, which whilst still a lot is more reasonable.
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FollowupID: 762967

Follow Up By: GT Campers - Tuesday, Jun 05, 2012 at 21:59

Tuesday, Jun 05, 2012 at 21:59
arfing hell, I'll be charging my customer about half that - but as you can see my trailers have only two wheels and it will be an option at manufacture, not a retro-fit, so less labour
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FollowupID: 763003

Reply By: Ross M - Tuesday, Jun 05, 2012 at 10:02

Tuesday, Jun 05, 2012 at 10:02
It is easy enough to buy two new hubs with the stud pattern you require to solve the problem.
Besides the offset/interference problem which may arise the issue of tyre diameter is also very real.
If you had to change to a spare off the trailer is it the same diameter and will your driveline and limited slip diff like the difference, if any.
Even a small amount of difference in diameter will cause stress on some mechanical parts because the wheels may be rotating at different speeds from what they are designed to do.
A recent post with a person using different tyre sizes front to back was going to try and travel the Simpson with the wheels trying to skid 37 metres every kilometre travelled. eg. 265/70 vs 265/75
There are also issues with ABS and stability control systems if used outside of emergency conditions.
AnswerID: 487682

Reply By: Rangiephil - Tuesday, Jun 05, 2012 at 10:55

Tuesday, Jun 05, 2012 at 10:55
Ross your observations are quite valid .
If you want to have the advantage of interchangeability , you must have tyres of the same roilling diameter. For example I have 245.70x16 tyres on my Range Rover and 205.80x16 on the trailer. These have exactly the same rolling diameter.
Also the trailer spare will only be used in an emergency, eg where a second tyre fails away from civilisation , so the lesser of two evils is to proceed to the nearest place with tyre repair/replacement facilities, rather than be stuck in the middle of nowhere.

The cost to redrill hubs is about $100, from my experience. You have to add the cost of studs and nuts also. In addition if the tyres are not the same diameter you have to consider that cost, although I would think a Kimberley camper would have tyres near to the diameter required. That needs checking.
Regard sPhilip A
AnswerID: 487687

Follow Up By: Rangiephil - Tuesday, Jun 05, 2012 at 10:59

Tuesday, Jun 05, 2012 at 10:59
BTW, I have never carried 4 spares and I consider it extreme overkill in this day and age.
And I have been on most of the iconic Australian tracks . the most I have ever done is one spare and an unmounted tyre.
Maybe I am lucky but I have never had a failure in 30 years of 4WD in Australia and the Middle East.
BUT I always start a trip with tyres at least 80% new.
Regards Philip A
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FollowupID: 762944

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