Leaf spring coating

Submitted: Saturday, Jun 16, 2012 at 11:29
ThreadID: 96299 Views:6428 Replies:9 FollowUps:6
This Thread has been Archived
Hi All,

I notice the leaf springs and axle on my camper are pretty rusty. I'll get them off and clean them up with a wire wheel, but what should I coat them with afterwards to try and keep further rust at bay?

Any ideas greatly appreciated.

Greg..
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: GT Campers - Saturday, Jun 16, 2012 at 11:32

Saturday, Jun 16, 2012 at 11:32
try Lanotec. It's a lanolin (sheep wool grease) product that works well in corrosive environments such as mining etc

Or use quality epoxy paint... or both!
AnswerID: 488609

Reply By: Ron N - Saturday, Jun 16, 2012 at 11:38

Saturday, Jun 16, 2012 at 11:38
Hey Greg! You should know automatically, that a man who really loves and cares for his machinery, uses leather spring gaiters! [;-)

https://www.google.com.au/webhp?source=search_app#hl=en&output=search&sclient=psy-ab&q=leather+spring+gaiters
AnswerID: 488610

Reply By: bill m - Saturday, Jun 16, 2012 at 11:51

Saturday, Jun 16, 2012 at 11:51
Hi Greg, I have had trailers and Caravans for 40 odd years (yep I'm a bit old) and for the entire time I have checked my wheel bearings yearly, and what I do is remove the grease from the bearings, rub the old grease onto the springs, it doesn't take too many bearing checks to completely cover the springs, and if a bit of road dust covers the grease who cares.
Cheers, Bill M
AnswerID: 488611

Reply By: Dust-Devil - Saturday, Jun 16, 2012 at 12:02

Saturday, Jun 16, 2012 at 12:02
Greg

Don't bother wasting Time Effort and money removing the springs and wire buffing them etc etc.

Just pressure (Water) clean them, let them dry and 'hose' them with Lanotec.

It will soak in and the surface rust disappears, whilst working its way between the leaves it does the same and lubricates the moving surfaces.

I have a 75 series Troopy which gets the above treatment regularly plus a Camper Trailer with Leaf Springs when I remember to do it. It really works a treat, however is not long lasting( like year/s or mega Kms) and really depends on the road/surface conditions you encounter on your travels.

I buy it in a bulk 5litre bottle and use a Bunnings $2.00 500ml hand spray bottle to apply it. The nozzle on these bottles can be adjusted from spray to stream depending on your requirement/s.

Before departing on a trip I pressure wash and spray the spring packs and carry the aforementioned spray bottle of Lanotec for re-application if/as necessary.

Sensational product, wouldn't be without it.

Regards

DD

PS

Just checked the product I am currently using - INOX - Lanox. Similar product but another brand.

AnswerID: 488612

Reply By: member - mazcan - Saturday, Jun 16, 2012 at 13:11

Saturday, Jun 16, 2012 at 13:11
hi greg
wash them down with truck wash and high pressure let them dry thoroughly
then jack the body up from the rear if possible or one side at a time if you cant jack up rear so the springs hang down which on most leaf
spring pack s will cause the leaves to seperate and create small spaces

this will allow the lanotec to get in between them better i have been using this method for 30 odd yrs on leaf springs it stops rust and on 4wds you will be amazed how smoother the ride is and on trailers it takes out that jolting jarring action when the wheels hit bumps
before the lanotec came on the market i used a mixure of graphite grease and thin motor oil in /from an oil can
cheers
barry
AnswerID: 488617

Reply By: gbc - Saturday, Jun 16, 2012 at 13:59

Saturday, Jun 16, 2012 at 13:59
Leaf springs rely on inter leaf friction to give them their rating. As others have found, lubricating them lessens their rating which on an underloaded axle is fine, but if the spring is at capacity anyway, may not be a good thing.
Greasable shackles have a similar effect - they let you know when they want grease.

AnswerID: 488620

Follow Up By: Member - Scrubby (VIC) - Saturday, Jun 16, 2012 at 18:34

Saturday, Jun 16, 2012 at 18:34
G`day gbc,

"Leaf springs rely on inter leaf friction to give them their rating."

If your statement above is correct why do they have grease able poly type discs between each leaf. ?

Well that's what my Old Man Emu springs have and I give them a squirt of Molybdenum Disulphide grease when I do the front Swivel Hubs.

Just wondering that's all.

Regards,

Scrubby
I don`t know where i`m going but i`m enjoying the journey.

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 763796

Follow Up By: gbc - Saturday, Jun 16, 2012 at 21:31

Saturday, Jun 16, 2012 at 21:31
There's a thousand different flash bits manufacturers put on 'their' leaf springs to make them special...
OME use anti squeak pads, greasable interleaf pads, and graphite coatings on the springs.

They are trying to sell a product, and in the meantime creating a maintenance regime (like putting greasable shackles on a car). There's no doubt a lubricated spring is more supple which is great if you have shocks that are up for the extra flogging, and with a beam axle flying up and down that is a big ask.

At the end of the day, leaf spring 'technology' hasn't improved much since to the 1950's when decent spring steel became available.

Trailer leaf springs are generally a more basic setup than cars, and if they weren't designed to be lubricated, they will behave differently if they are. Without any shock absorbers you could well be creating an unpreferred setup, however it would be rare as leaves if nothing else, are generally forgiving.

Ask any truck aligner or heavy transport suspension specialist - A leaning cab will almost certainly have a wet (oiled) spring on the low side.
0
FollowupID: 763814

Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Saturday, Jun 16, 2012 at 14:20

Saturday, Jun 16, 2012 at 14:20
IMO rust on leaf springs is not a problem.
Lubrication just attracts dust and dirt.
On my vehicle, I disassemble the leaf springs about every 4 years, clean and reassemble, and replace the bushes/pads etc if necessary, but I no longer grease them.
AnswerID: 488622

Follow Up By: racinrob - Saturday, Jun 16, 2012 at 16:06

Saturday, Jun 16, 2012 at 16:06
I'm with you on this Phil, any sort of lubricant will hold fine particles of grit between the leafs and become a grinding paste. Pressure clean them sure but avoid any type of oil including Lanotec.

rr
0
FollowupID: 763786

Follow Up By: Member - Scrubby (VIC) - Saturday, Jun 16, 2012 at 18:50

Saturday, Jun 16, 2012 at 18:50
G`day Phil & rr,

Just a friendly Question or two.......... Do you grease the front Swivel Hubs ?
Do you grease the Tow Ball and Coupling ?
Do you leave the Wheel Studs dry ?

I agree about problem of dust and grit but I consider it essential that these parts be lubricated.
As in a "Follow Up" above I have OME suspension that has discs between each leaf that have grease grooves radiating out from their grease point.
So I grease them.

Regards,

Scrubby.

I don`t know where i`m going but i`m enjoying the journey.

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 763797

Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Saturday, Jun 16, 2012 at 20:59

Saturday, Jun 16, 2012 at 20:59
Gday Scrubby,

Swivel Hubs have felt wiper seals separating the dirt from the moly grease.
Tow ball (AT35 Hitch) - yep I smear that with moly grease and yep, it attracts the dirt. But it needs lube otherwise it squeaks like crazy.
Wheel studs - yes I smear them with grease even though the manual says not to - but they stay clean because of dome shaped nuts.

But leaf springs????? If you don't grease them, they still work the same - steel slides on steel - doesn't need grease. I also have OME leaf springs with a few yellow pads at the end of the spriings which help to keep it all quiet.
0
FollowupID: 763808

Follow Up By: racinrob - Saturday, Jun 16, 2012 at 21:53

Saturday, Jun 16, 2012 at 21:53
Scrubby, you're not comparing apples with apples, OME springs are a bit different !
Phil G answered for me on swivel hubs and I don't have a tow ball coupling as such, I have a McHitch Coupling which works on a sealed universal joint. I also have domed wheel nuts but even on them I don't use a lubricant, I drove trucks most of my working life and oil or grease on wheel nuts was a no no, old habits die hard I guess.

rr
0
FollowupID: 763818

Reply By: Rockape - Saturday, Jun 16, 2012 at 18:01

Saturday, Jun 16, 2012 at 18:01
Greg,
I might be doing something wrong but I have never touched mine except for shackle bushes. Front are 17 years old and rears 20 years old. I do check them and spread the leaves from time to time to have a look but this is all I do.

If you aren't playing in saltwater I would just leave them alone and rename the camper "The Rustic Maid".
AnswerID: 488641

Reply By: Ross M - Saturday, Jun 16, 2012 at 19:17

Saturday, Jun 16, 2012 at 19:17
While Lanotec is good and works well another product to use is a Moly spray which attaches itself to the spring surface and remains there. It is Molybdenum Sulphide based and also lubricates very well.
On Landcruiser springs I used both products and found the Moly to be longer lasting and lubes the spring action so it works in a more supple manner. Noticeably better than nothing at all. Just supplemented with lanotec while out and on the road.
AnswerID: 488647

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)