snatch strap

Is this a suitable snatch strap for an 80 series landcruiser? Any thoughts?

http://www.ebay.com/itm/170855761930?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1438.l2649



Where is the best place to bolt TOYOTA LANDCRUISER NEW GENIUNE RECOVERY HITCH?
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Reply By: teza - Sunday, Jun 24, 2012 at 15:34

Sunday, Jun 24, 2012 at 15:34
NO

Read the add It say's Tow Pulling strap not snatch strap

Can't comment on the Recovery hitch as I can't see if it is rated or not but the last rated recovery hitch I bought was a lot more than $ 17.

You maybe better talking to a 4x4 retailer of a reputable brand.

Cheers Teza
AnswerID: 489301

Reply By: Member - Vern (North Haven SA) - Sunday, Jun 24, 2012 at 15:42

Sunday, Jun 24, 2012 at 15:42
My advise to you is not to buy cheap copies of any recovery equipment and stick to a reputable brand. I have seen to many cheap copies fail or are useless when you really need them.
AnswerID: 489302

Reply By: garrycol - Sunday, Jun 24, 2012 at 15:51

Sunday, Jun 24, 2012 at 15:51
Definitely not - that is some sort of tow rope not a snatch strap - also comes from Hong Kong so most likely does not meet Australian regulations.

Snatch straps are not expensive - I would buy locally - ARB, TJM even Supercheap and will meet Aust requirements and have the appropriate tags on it.

Also I doubt that Toyota recovery hitch is rated for snatches - looks like a tow point and not rated for snatch recoveries. What is its rating??? That will provide a clue.

Garry
AnswerID: 489304

Reply By: Member - Jason B (NSW) - Sunday, Jun 24, 2012 at 15:52

Sunday, Jun 24, 2012 at 15:52
No good as a snatch or tow strap for an 80 series in my opinion. Spend the money and get a rated snatch strap. Also a rated tow strap and rated shackles while you are at it.

I wouldn't use that point as a recovery hitch either. Use your tow tongue reciever instead, and use the pin through the eye of a rated strap.

You are setting your self up for failure with those hooks and that strap/recovery point in any harf series situation with your 80 series.


Regards

jas
AnswerID: 489305

Reply By: Ross M - Sunday, Jun 24, 2012 at 16:30

Sunday, Jun 24, 2012 at 16:30
If you look at the construction of the hitch, it in no way suggests the strength required for snatch type loads and forces.
Usually snatch straps don't come with hooks as part of the system but tow straps would.
As the Fireman said, No way Hose "A", to both items.
AnswerID: 489308

Reply By: rainbowprof - Sunday, Jun 24, 2012 at 16:35

Sunday, Jun 24, 2012 at 16:35
The vendor describes the hitch as TOYOTA LANDCRUISER NEW GENIUNE RECOVERY HITCH. I have requested further info from the company. I have a 4.75 T rated bow shackle to put through the tongue of tow bar (in Hayman Reece hitch) to use as an alternative if necessary. Many people on LCOOL for example seem to have used the tie down/ recovery loops OEM on their criuisers. I'll look further for a snatch strap. I've have always just dug myself out to date. Many muddy hours digging, jacking and filling holes with rocks and bushes..
AnswerID: 489309

Follow Up By: Member - Jason B (NSW) - Sunday, Jun 24, 2012 at 18:48

Sunday, Jun 24, 2012 at 18:48
If you can Rainbowprof, leave the shackle out of the recovery at your (tow vehicle) end. Look for a strap with eyes on the end narrow enough to fit into the towbar (box section) where the tow reciever usually fits. Push the eye in the box section and then put your pin (that normally holds the tongue) through the eye of the strap.

This removes one more piece of potentially flying metal from the recovery. Some straps have very wide ends on them that wont fit in the box section, however others are made to suit this purpose.


Regards


Jas
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Reply By: Member - Tony V (NSW) - Sunday, Jun 24, 2012 at 16:38

Sunday, Jun 24, 2012 at 16:38
Rainbow

The eBay ad states that this is a Towing strap not a snatch strap.

You need a strap that is rated and has that rating identified on the strap.
I never recover anyone who's equipment is not rated.

You need a strap that is two and half to three times the weight of your vehicle.
So 8000kg is ideal, don't get conned into a 11,000kg strap because it won't stretch and give you the kinetic recoil that a snatch recovery needs.

The recovery point/hitch, I have never seen on an Australian Toyota, again I would not recover you using that point.

With all due respect, and before you purchase things that may not be up to scratch, visit a 4WD Club and ask questions, all Clubs I know of welcome people and are happy to get visitors through the basics without any issue.
This forum is great for information but not practical hands on, Clubs can also provide training. If you are not into clubs, think about some driver training, this will give you the knowledge that you are looking for.

AnswerID: 489310

Reply By: Les - PK Ranger - Sunday, Jun 24, 2012 at 16:57

Sunday, Jun 24, 2012 at 16:57
Get a snatch strap from Bunnings, they have 10000kg rated for $39.90, ropes section.
These also make a great spare for longer snatches, or to keep in the back to sell cheap to someone that doesn't have their own (and expects you to use your gear to get them out).

Get your rated shackles from any of the 4WD stores or Supercheap.

AnswerID: 489314

Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Sunday, Jun 24, 2012 at 17:18

Sunday, Jun 24, 2012 at 17:18
LOL!! I like the thinking!! Michael


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Follow Up By: rainbowprof - Sunday, Jun 24, 2012 at 17:27

Sunday, Jun 24, 2012 at 17:27
Thanks Les. Too easy. And I appreciate the light humour. Almost passed me by. Funnily enough, I must admit when I have helped people broken down or stuck I have been happy to lend them my tow ropes, jumper cables, voltmeter and tools -and was pleased I could be of service. At the time it never worried me that they were using MY gear, and the fact it was mine was not really an inconvenience to me.
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Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Sunday, Jun 24, 2012 at 19:48

Sunday, Jun 24, 2012 at 19:48
Rainbowprof!! I think Les was saying that snatch straps have a limited life and are usually rolled up clean and dry in the owners vehicle. Once used and especially in mud or water, the owner of the snatch strap, usually the guy doing the recovery, ends up with a wet, muddy and partially used strap. This then has to be stored wet in his vehicle and then cleaned and dried at a later date, long after the bogged guy is home and free!! Get his point?? Hence selling him one or insisting on using his strap if he has one. Makes perfect sense to me!! Michael

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Follow Up By: rainbowprof - Sunday, Jun 24, 2012 at 20:11

Sunday, Jun 24, 2012 at 20:11
Sure Michael, that's fair enough. I have never used a snatch strap so I'm open to learning about the correct usage and etiquette as it arises.

Actually I'm preparing for a trip and my 2 vehicles (80 series and Troopie) are parked at my brother's in Melbourne. I'm currently on an overseas assignment so am buying a few last minute things on ebay so I hit the ground running when I fly in on the 4th July. As I will leave Melbourne heading north 5 days later I need to get a bit organized, and I just got a different cargo carrier/ roofrack amd rooftop tent that will need my attention when I arrive. The vehicle was serviced last week, but I will double check the suspension to feel more confident of the capabilities of the vehicle. The Troopie is manual, and it's tried and true with OME underneath. The new purchase (80 series) with 1HD-T and auto has my brain racing as to what I want to improve or adapt in the week before driving to central Qld via the Simpson. I'm asking questions as my mind goes over the multitude of eventualities, so I 've been raising a few questions that are no doubt basic knowledge to others. This forum has been very supportive and helpful, so thanks to everyone who has offered advice, comments and suggestions.
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Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Monday, Jun 25, 2012 at 07:47

Monday, Jun 25, 2012 at 07:47
I don't mind using my gear to help others, but anyone that goes out to venues where they might get stuck, should have the basics like snatch strap and shackles.
It is an impost to use them under some circumstances, bad weather and mud is one of the worst, as you strap is then weaker for the next snatch if needed, and needs to be cleaned and dried properly to prevent deterioration from particle abrasion or moisture.

As someone else mentioned, you can eliminate one or both shackles by using the receiver hitch and hook the hitch pin instead of the solid billet recovery point, if the loops are ok to fit.
Most of the 10000kg rated straps have larger loops.

Someone also said steer clear of Bunnings ?
Nothing wrong with this strap, wouldn't touch the shackles unless they are rated (haven't looked) but the strap is fine. (They have 2 types I saw in 10000kg, and some in 5000kg, don't bother with the lighter one).



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Reply By: wizzer73 - Sunday, Jun 24, 2012 at 18:56

Sunday, Jun 24, 2012 at 18:56
There have been at least 4 to 5 deaths that I have heard of in the last 12mths of incorrect snatch strap use. here is an article of one of them. article on snatch strap death
Seems to always be a bystander or passenger that cops it too.

A snatch strap and rated recovery points isn't something to be done on the cheap.

wizzer
AnswerID: 489325

Follow Up By: rainbowprof - Sunday, Jun 24, 2012 at 19:03

Sunday, Jun 24, 2012 at 19:03
that is certainly an alarming article. As another member thoughtfully posted earlier, Bunnings will be my next stop for a correctly rated item.
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Follow Up By: Muddy.au - Sunday, Jun 24, 2012 at 20:57

Sunday, Jun 24, 2012 at 20:57
I agree a 100% wizzer, recovery is the most dangerous activity in 4 wheel driving, buy only good quality gear (forget bunnings) and know how to use it, if you don't want to spend the money get a long handle shovel.
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Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Monday, Jun 25, 2012 at 07:48

Monday, Jun 25, 2012 at 07:48
Muddy, nothing wrong with this strap at all, see above follow up pics.
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Reply By: rainbowprof - Monday, Jun 25, 2012 at 04:49

Monday, Jun 25, 2012 at 04:49
Is this the type of recovery point likely to withstand a snatch?


similar to that on LCOOL


None oif them appear to have a load rating imprinted on them.
AnswerID: 489359

Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Monday, Jun 25, 2012 at 16:50

Monday, Jun 25, 2012 at 16:50
That recovery plate is probably one of the best i have seen! It at least pulls almost in line with at least one of the bolts! Most have the attaching hole way lower than the bolts and have the potential to twist the bolts with the leverage applied!! Michael



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Reply By: GT Campers - Monday, Jun 25, 2012 at 09:34

Monday, Jun 25, 2012 at 09:34
Rainbowprof,

get off Ebay and its $19.99 junk crap from chingchang and go and talk to a proper 4WD retailer for the equipment you need.

Then, before you attempt such as risky and expensive trek as the Simpson, learn how to use your equipment, and your new 80 series, properly via an active club or a commercial course.
AnswerID: 489365

Follow Up By: rainbowprof - Monday, Jun 25, 2012 at 12:58

Monday, Jun 25, 2012 at 12:58
I do appreciate your input, your points are perfectly valid. The strap I pictured is not the correct one, the one I have chosen is Ironman 9000 kg rating (sadly for you they are made in China or Malaysia I suspect, I 'd prefer not to refer to them as chingchang though), the hitch has come directly from brand new Landcruisers according to the Australian vendor who emailed me this morning, and before I have it installed by an appropriate professional I will get a second opinion as to the advisability of using it- or get another more suitable component at the time. LCOOL articles suggest I may need to move a radiator bolt to fit it. I can see snatches are a potentially dangerous situation, as is driving a vehicle in the city. More people die doing that. Forewarned is forearmed. Obviously you are a professional in the field of off-road campers so I appreciate that you share your knowledge.

I pose questions to get constructive advice as I have insufficient knowledge on mechanical (and many other) subjects. My experiences in survival situations are not insubstantial, but I'm not an expert and am happy to take on board advice from the many with life experiences in areas different to my own. Having travelled to a large number of Australian destinations in many vehicle types through the years (before being in a position to afford a more 'capable' vehicle) quite successfully with just a tow rope, shovel, and basic camping equipment I have lived to tell the tale. Crossing the Kokoda trail solo, visiting Everest Base Camp in Tibet, crossing 5400 m passes in winter in Nepal, or just doing the Cradle Mountain- Lake St Clair or Milford trail (35 years ago) all had elements that needed advance planning. I'm doing my planning. Your help is much appreciated. I changed my plan last year at the final moment for the Anne Beadell trip after preparing copiously because of last minute changes that allowed me to see another time would be better. --It happens. Your suggestion of doing a course is certainly a good idea. Calculated risks are a valuable component of life, though. The very spice thereof. I trust my family with our 4 kids appreciate the trouble I go to to give them these irreplaceable opportunities. Unfortunately the fear mindset of the world has impinged on my lifestyle now to the extent that I carry a satphone which I have never used, except for a test email. Everything changes. That's the only constant.
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Follow Up By: Member - Bruce C (NSW) - Monday, Jun 25, 2012 at 13:40

Monday, Jun 25, 2012 at 13:40
Good reply Prof.

GT tends to be a bit brusque some times.
Hopefully he means well.

Cheers, Bruce.
At home and at ease on a track that I know not and
restless and lost on a track that I know. HL.

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Follow Up By: GT Campers - Monday, Jun 25, 2012 at 14:24

Monday, Jun 25, 2012 at 14:24
Good stuff Rainbowprof, I am sure you can see my - and others' - concerns about your trek and level of experience from this and other posts you have made. Like anyone else, I just want to see you have good time and not 'bite off more than you can chew' with unrealistic expectations, little experience and poor equipment choice.

yes Bruce, always happy to help here and elswhere, and I'd rather be brusque (good word!) on an internet forum by making people think about things than have my police mates pick up bits and pieces of brain and body when something goes clunk-doonk splat. Or, have someone up for a $4000 tow from some remote area because dreams and aspirations overtook common sense and ability!
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Follow Up By: rainbowprof - Monday, Jun 25, 2012 at 16:01

Monday, Jun 25, 2012 at 16:01
Not a worry. Pleased that so any readers have chosen to respond with their knowledge and sound opinions. I mean, if I knew the answers I wouldn't bother asking these questions. I get the gist of it, and have now read a lot more on the subject. Even got down and watched Australian 4wd Action videos about it to give me a true blue perspective. Bring it on.
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Follow Up By: Member - Bruce C (NSW) - Monday, Jun 25, 2012 at 16:03

Monday, Jun 25, 2012 at 16:03
There is an old saying GT which is very apt.

" You catch more flies with honey than you do with vinegar"

Cheers, Bruce.
At home and at ease on a track that I know not and
restless and lost on a track that I know. HL.

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Follow Up By: GT Campers - Monday, Jun 25, 2012 at 16:09

Monday, Jun 25, 2012 at 16:09
yep and an ounce of prevention is better than a kilo of cure.. or something!
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Reply By: The Bantam - Monday, Jun 25, 2012 at 10:15

Monday, Jun 25, 2012 at 10:15
The first clue that the strap pictured is not a snatch strap is the fact that it is fitted with hooks.....sorry I would not even tow with it.

There are a couple of toyota genuine recovery points that will withstand snatch recoveries.........but you need to know what yo are looking at....and then some will argue the point.

Almost every vehicle, if you work out the breaking strains across the whole chain of gear, should be using two recovery points on the front AND an equaliser strap.

This recovery gear issue can be a life and death matter.....there are plenty of numb skulls out there that think they do not need to learn about the dangers and proper practices of recovery before they head out.

People are killed and injured every year.....AND IN AUSTRALIA.... by inadequate gear and dangeerous recovery practices.

The forces and speeds involved when this sort of gear fails are massive.

cheers

AnswerID: 489368

Reply By: wizzer73 - Monday, Jun 25, 2012 at 16:50

Monday, Jun 25, 2012 at 16:50
Just to add to the discussion, are you travelling in one vehicle? If so, a set of maxtrax (or similar) may be of more benefit to you. I always carry both.

wizzer
AnswerID: 489386

Follow Up By: rainbowprof - Monday, Jun 25, 2012 at 17:11

Monday, Jun 25, 2012 at 17:11
maxtrax-yes, I 'm looking into that at the moment. My preferred option if I can fit them in (and afford them...) Following some that are up for sale at the currently.
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