80 Series Petrol/Gas or Diesel????

Submitted: Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 18:57
ThreadID: 96670 Views:4662 Replies:8 FollowUps:7
This Thread has been Archived
Do I get an 80 series in petrol/gas or diesel? Which has better general fuel consumption? e.g. around town, towing, light 4x4ing? Thanks Mark
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Geoff H (Q - Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 19:54

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 19:54
Hi Mark,

When I bought mine the Diesel model was much more expensive so I went for the petrol and fitted gas, the consumption is a bit more with gas but the gas is half the price.

The diesel is good for serious off road work but I never had a problem with the petrol with the work I did.

I had to pay for fuel on the trip to the Cape so it cost a couple of hundred more for that trip but I saved ten grand on the purchase price so I was still front.

Regards
Geoff
AnswerID: 490133

Follow Up By: Member - Bruce C (NSW) - Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 17:27

Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 17:27
I agree with your comments 110% Geoff.
Bruce
At home and at ease on a track that I know not and
restless and lost on a track that I know. HL.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 765441

Reply By: Hairs & Fysh - Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 19:57

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 19:57
Hi Mark ,
Here are my figures for my 91 1HD-T, have a look through my profile for links.
When towing our very heavy camper, 16-17L/100
Empty on the highway as low as 10L/100
Around town about 12-13L/100
4wdriving depending on about the same.
Here is my Fuelly Account.
Hope this helps.

AnswerID: 490134

Reply By: Member - Bruce C (NSW) - Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 11:44

Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 11:44
Hi Mark,
I had a succession of dual fuel vehicles and the last was a 1HD FT diesel 80 series which had gas over diesel. Fair bit of experience in other words.

I found that while you use more litres of gas in your dual fuel vehicle it works out cheaper than diesel power provided the price of gas is half the price of diesel, or there abouts. Either way it works outs much cheaper than petrol.

Gas is cheapest in the southern parts of the country and dearer the further north you go. It is also harder to locate the further north you go. This is why dual fuel is the way to go for touring. Or a diesel vehicle

As regards the choice "dual fuel or diesel" I would suggest it comes down to your pocket and personal prefference as the long term ownership of either choice is line ball.

With dual fuel you pay as you go where as with diesel you will eventually fork it out in big lumps when the troubles start. This has been my experience.

My prefference is petrol or dual fuel as you do not have to worry about exhaust gas temperatures when towing up hills and all the other things you need to worry about with diesels such as regular frequent servicing.

One thing about the 80 series petrols is that they eventually develope oil weeping past the valve stems. This I found to be n advantage as it performed the task of upper cylinder lubrication and acted as a valve saver so I never bothered doing anything about it as it was an advantage.

When comparing fuel consumption it is best to relate to the "kilometres per dollar" not the "litres per hundred Ks" as the former is a truest comparison of consumption, one fuel to another.

As regards gas over diesel,
the advantage is slight and when calculating benefit versus cost it fails as the conversion costs are somewhere around $4,500 from the information I have gleaned. It may have comedown in recent times but that was what my investigations showed. At those figures it would take many many years to recover costs.

Converting an 80 series petrol to gas is a good idea provided gas prices do not climb too much especially if the vehicle has low kilometres. You will recover the outlay withing a few years in fuel cost savings.

Petrol 80 series are a good value buy these days. If it is already on gas then doubly so.

Cheers, Bruce.






At home and at ease on a track that I know not and
restless and lost on a track that I know. HL.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  Send Message

AnswerID: 490173

Follow Up By: Charlie B2 - Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 13:22

Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 13:22
Hi folks,

I'd argue, like others above, that it's probably horses for courses.

I happen to run a 100 series turbo diesel after having had a 60 series diesel for years. For my purposes, I'd personally pick diesel, and have done so, twice, but that's me. Your needs are likely to differ from mine. Out in the real bush, gas can be inconvenient, if not a disaster waiting to happen if you're relying on it - just ask the lass who had to spend a week at a roadhouse on the Stuart Highway years ago, when the gas truck didn't get through. Yeah, I know that this can happen to any of us, with any fuel, but you can at least carry spare liquid fuel in a jerry can, to transfer it to another vehicle. Can't wait to see someone try that with gas!

If the 80 series you're looking at is already on gas, it will definitely pay to check the expiry date on the gas cylinder. They're only approved for ten years and the need for re-testing (and the additional cost and incinvenience) isn't something you want to find out about after you've done the deal.

Regards,


Charlie
0
FollowupID: 765428

Follow Up By: Member - Bruce C (NSW) - Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 13:46

Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 13:46
That's why I always suggest dual fuel, Charlie, as even dedicated gas in the city is mighty inconvenient if you run out. Dual Fuel is the way to go if considering gas.

As said, it is a matter of personal prefference, but when you see those EGTs climbing (like 700c plus) when towing a 2 tonne + van up a steep hill and you can't back off, the only picture that comes to mind is of melted pistons and huge dollars. This is the outcome warned against on these pages more times than I care to remember. It makes petrol look like a very inexpensive alternative.

I get peace of mind when towing with a petrol vehicle, something I could not get from my diesel even though it was cheaper on a holiday and the torque was brilliant.

I love my V8 petrol.

Cheers, Bruce
At home and at ease on a track that I know not and
restless and lost on a track that I know. HL.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 765430

Follow Up By: landseka - Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 16:33

Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 16:33
Yeah, I know that this can happen to any of us, with any fuel, but you can at least carry spare liquid fuel in a jerry can, to transfer it to another vehicle. Can't wait to see someone try that with gas!

Not saying it is a good idea Charlie but I know of it being done with an appropriate hose made up & decanting a 9kg bottle into a stranded car.

Bruce, wouldn't changing to a lower gear reduce the EGT?

Just curious as I have never had a gauge to see for myself.

Cheers Neil

0
FollowupID: 765434

Follow Up By: Member - Bruce C (NSW) - Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 17:15

Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 17:15
Hi Neil,
On one hill I remember I had nothing left, but low range, and it was boiling when I got to the top as there was no place to pull over. Mind you it cooled down quickly once I had reached the top and the slope flattened out.
I did not have an EGT gauge at that time but on fitting one latter I was alarmed at the temperatures reached.

Many towing with their turbo diesels do not have EGT gauges fitted and so are oblivious to the temps the EGTs get to.

Once I had the motor reconditioned I found it difficult to keep the EGT down and it used to worry me no end. I spent a considerable amount of money on it also always getting one thing or another done to sort out the exhaust temps.

In the end I gave up and went for the V8 petrol. Laughing now as I have no worries when towing and all I have to do is put fuel in the tank.

I used to get 17 litres per 100K in the 1HD FT and now I get 22 to 24 towing the new and heavier van in the V8 so I am not worried as it is ball park for me considering the lack of worry.

Cheers, Bruce
At home and at ease on a track that I know not and
restless and lost on a track that I know. HL.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 765435

Follow Up By: dazren - Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 19:49

Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 19:49
Gidday Bruce, It's a pleasure to read an informative opinion from some one that has been there done that with the range of vehicles, I run a Colarado factory fitted duel/fuel 2011 model and tow a 19' Lotus Laden wght 2380 Kgs, I am very happy with the set-up, My best mate and travelling companion Also has a 2006 V8 Cruiser, and returns about the same figures as you have quoted, and his van is 2700 Kgs Laden,
Your comments in relation to this thread, seem very fair and unbiased, as you have stated the facts, as you have found them , after owning and running both Diesel and Duel/Fuel Vehicles Where as most Diesel owners will only fly thier own flag, as would the owners of Petrol, or Duel fuel vehicles
It really is Horses for courses, and personal choice ?? Thanks Dazren
0
FollowupID: 765448

Reply By: PeterInSa - Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 15:24

Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 15:24
Mark,
The other question I would ask is are you going to tow a larger van say a 21' Tandem in the time that you will own the LS 80. If so I would consider a late 80 series from memory after 96/97 as I underatnd that can tow bigger vans the same as the 100 series.

I would confirm this also, prior to the purchase.

Peter
AnswerID: 490186

Follow Up By: Member - Bruce C (NSW) - Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 17:21

Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 17:21
Peter,
As I used to own an 97 model 80 series dual fuel I was looking at a write up about them in some forum or ather and one chap said that 80 series vehicles produced after November 96 as I recall, had a tow rating of 3 tonne or 3.5
tonne, I can't remember exactly. However I have not been able to confirm this.

I have seen nothing official re this.

Cheers, Bruce.
At home and at ease on a track that I know not and
restless and lost on a track that I know. HL.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 765440

Reply By: landseka - Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 16:38

Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 16:38
I can't speak for a diesel 80 series Mark but the '98 GXL 40th Anniversary we had returned 22l/100km on petrol & 30l/100km on gas towing our 2t van.

With our current TD diesel Triton I get 13 - 15l/100km towing the same van, it also tows it with more power to spare than the 80 did.

I can't give you figures for not towing as I never bothered to check.

Cheers Neil
AnswerID: 490188

Reply By: Mark S10 - Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 19:24

Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 19:24
Thank you everyone for your feedback and it is greatly appreciated. I suppose I picked the 80 Series as I have had 100's in the past as well as a Prado and now have taken up photogrpahy and just want something to get me to THOSE hard to get places for some nice photos. I was originally interested in an Isuzu MU Diesel but being only a 4 seater kind of limited me a bit. Plus I really only wanted a 4x4 under 10K to keep the Minister of War and Finance happy.
Towing is another story and I once towed a 16' van with my GXL 100 to the Far South Coast and once I did the numbers with petrol added to van park fee's it added up to the price of an onsite cabin. So maybe a smaller van one day and maybe the dream of THAT big trip where ever it may be. :-)

So happy trails folks and thanks for your great advice.

Mark (Newcastle NSW)
AnswerID: 490191

Reply By: Member - Peter R (QLD) - Friday, Jul 06, 2012 at 09:28

Friday, Jul 06, 2012 at 09:28
I had a bad experience with petrol/gas http://www.exploroz.com/Forum/Topic/27303/LPG_problem_backfiring_in_80_series_landcruiser.aspx?ky=&sn=&p=%2fForum%2fDefault.aspx%3fwt%3d1%26pn%3d1

Would definitely check out the age of the LPG system, and follow the tips in that thread.

Pedro


AnswerID: 490227

Reply By: Mark S14 - Tuesday, Jul 10, 2012 at 20:09

Tuesday, Jul 10, 2012 at 20:09
OK, as luck would have it a 92 Petrol 4L 80 series Cruiser has popped up close to my home. The good news it is only $3,500 with some faded paint of the bonnet and roof but I have not inspected it yet and hopefully tomorrow. The bad news, and yes for that price there has to be which I expected.....it has 416,000 k's on it which scares me somewhat. But what should I look for when I inspect it or should I just walk away now??? I don't mind spending a few $$ bringing it up to spec but don't want the hassle of big engine problems? Any advice would be greatly appreciated?
Thanks Mark
AnswerID: 490594

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)