Gas convsion on an 05 PA Mitsubishi Challenger

Submitted: Saturday, Sep 01, 2012 at 16:28
ThreadID: 97780 Views:4192 Replies:3 FollowUps:5
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I recenlly bought an 05 Challenger to replace the ailing Jackaroo and am already understanding why owners polish the three point star and say "Love that car!". Well in the ads they do.
There doesn't seem to be a long range tank available but another owner parked beside me at the shopping centre this afternoon with the gas tank where the spare tyre is on mine and a replacement rear bar with swinging wheel mount. It would be a more expensive set up but with a long term bonus of cheaper fuel as well as increased range.
I was just wondering if some folks on this forum have experience of a gas conversion on a Challenger and how it worked out.
Thanks.
Kevin
PS. Excuse spelling mistakes but spell check does not seem to be working.
K
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Reply By: Les J - Sunday, Sep 02, 2012 at 02:34

Sunday, Sep 02, 2012 at 02:34
Hi Kevin,
Fitting gas conversion & moving spare wheel to rear carrier? will set you back
somewhere around $4000 to over $6000 depending on who supplies & installs
the units... will you save that much money on fuel in the time you own this car? car uses more gas & car runs much hotter which could be a problem when
towing..might be more cost affective to have a fuel tank made to fit somewhere under your car.. I have a 2002 Challenger i did look at gas conversion,but just didn't think it was worth the cost for what i was going to save. I tow a one & half ton caravan & cruise along around 90km per hour &
barring head winds usually return 425km from the standard fuel tank, if we are
going a bit further away we just carry a few jerry cans of extra fuel.
Cheers Les J









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Follow Up By: Member - Kevin S (QLD) - Sunday, Sep 02, 2012 at 08:40

Sunday, Sep 02, 2012 at 08:40
Thanks Les J. After seeing the set up on the other Challenger yesterday I thought I would seek comment. What you say makes much sense. The good old jerry can is a very low cost solution for a lot of problems - and I already own a couple. I am interested in the range you get from a standard tank. I haven't towed the van with the Challenger yet so will be keen to see how far I get. There seems to be a lot of petrol left in the tank when the gage points to empty.
Cheers,
Kevin
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Follow Up By: Erad - Sunday, Sep 02, 2012 at 10:17

Sunday, Sep 02, 2012 at 10:17
Kevin:
I have a 2000 NL Pajero (3.5L engine - same as yours). It has done 240000 km - most of it on gas. 110000 of that towing a 16.5 ft Jayco Poptop caravan as well. I have had problems with the ignition leads, but hopefully have sorted them now. The leads are very skinny and can easily flash over from one lead to another. WHen this happens, if the other lead goes to a cylinder with an open inlet valve, you get a hell of a big BANG, which does wonders for your air cleaner. Other than that, nothing major in the way of engine problems. The 3.5L Mitsubishi engine on the Pajero was 100% LPG copmpatible, and I assume that yours is too. You should check with Mitsubishi about this.

Do the sums yourself. When I had gas fitted in 2000, it was simple. We travel at about 95 km/hr with the caravan, and get around 330 km from a 70L tank of gas when going on level ground. It knocks back to 275 km in very hilly country. If using petrol, I would expect to use around 55 L for the same distances. Depending on where you are, petrol will cost $1.50 per litre and gas $0.80.

Assume you travel 1000 km. You will use 212 Lof LPG ($170) or 167 L of petrol ($250). In other words, you save $80 per 1000 km of travel. You know how long you are going to keep your vehicle, and how much it will cost to convert. You can decide if it is worthwhile.

For me, there was no contest. The conversion cost was $2600, and every 20000 km I did repaid that conversion cost, so I am well in front. Theoretically, I could leave my Pajero on the side of the road and it would not wwe me anything now because of the savings I have made in fuel costs. And NO - I am not doing that! There is also a slight advantage in that you have extended range with both LPG and petrol. We have driven round the block twice now and have used only 2 tankfuls of petrol each time. Mind you, LPG was expensive in places, but overall we were well in front on prices. Typically, we travelled to a spot and left the van there whilst we went out exploring the local area. LPG is available in most of the popular areas, but not in really remote places such as BIrdsville etc.
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Follow Up By: Member - Kevin S (QLD) - Sunday, Sep 02, 2012 at 19:38

Sunday, Sep 02, 2012 at 19:38
Hi Erad. Its actually a 3.00 L motor but probably has a lower body weight than your Paj. So I guess your figures are fairly typical of what I would experience in a gas conversion. Thanks for your input.
Kevin
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Reply By: Member - Oldbaz. NSW. - Monday, Sep 03, 2012 at 14:18

Monday, Sep 03, 2012 at 14:18
G'day Kevin, I'm pleased to hear you"re finding the Challenger to your liking. It is
my understanding that the car is largely based on the Triton & I'm sure long range
tanks are made for them...might be worth checking out. cheers....oldbaz.
AnswerID: 494174

Follow Up By: Member - Kevin S (QLD) - Tuesday, Sep 04, 2012 at 15:11

Tuesday, Sep 04, 2012 at 15:11
Hi Barry. The ARB web site shows the Challenger with no long distance tank available but the Triton/L200/Strada combination as having a long tank available for the manufacture date range into which my vehicle falls. Their tanks seem to be made by The Longranger so I will drop them a note and see what the storey is.
Thanks for your comment.
Kevin
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Reply By: pickle - Tuesday, Sep 04, 2012 at 20:24

Tuesday, Sep 04, 2012 at 20:24
Brown Davis makes a 120 ltr replacement tank for the PA Challenger. I have one on mine.
Challengers are gas compatable but you will have the gas tank where the spare wheel goes so this means moving the spare to either the bar system on thev rear or placing the gas tank inside . Personall I have never thought the Challenger that thirsty to warrant a gas conversion.
Dave
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Follow Up By: Member - Kevin S (QLD) - Tuesday, Sep 04, 2012 at 20:55

Tuesday, Sep 04, 2012 at 20:55
That's good information Dave. Thanks. My interest in gas was as a possible method of extending range if a long range tank was not available. My preference is to leave the spare wheel where it is and certainly not to lose my luggage space to a dirty big gas tank. A larger replacement tank is a good option for me as a fair bit of our towing will be in remote areas where gas prices will be relatively high.
Cheers,
Kevin
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