Removing 105 series Landcruiser manual gearbox

Submitted: Saturday, Sep 29, 2012 at 19:29
ThreadID: 98314 Views:11935 Replies:7 FollowUps:10
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The clutch has had it and a large quote for labour has inspired me to have a go myself at getting the gearbox out of my 105 series Landcruiser. I have the manual and covered most of the undoing of stuff including starter, exhaust etc. The manual suggests that it is possible to simply move the gearbox back while dropping the rear of the motor. I am not so convinced that there is enough clearance between the bellhousing and the floorpan for this to occur. I have read that it may be necessary to rotate the gearbox 90 degrees to get adequate clearance. This is not indicated in the manual.
Has anyone done this and is it necessary to rotate the gearbox? If it is the case it might cost me a few beers as I get around some mates!
Thanks in anticipation for any advice.
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Reply By: Aussi Traveller - Saturday, Sep 29, 2012 at 19:52

Saturday, Sep 29, 2012 at 19:52
I have done it without a hoist once with a qualified mechanic, it took 9 hours, that was gear box out new one in, this was without a clutch change and was no fun.
Yes you need to rotate it not quite 45 degrees.
I have done it with a hoist and changing a clutch, total hours 2 out 2 in, however if you are doing a clutch I always machine the fly wheel as well a must IMOA.

Have fun Phil.

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Follow Up By: Member - Andrew L (QLD) - Saturday, Sep 29, 2012 at 20:18

Saturday, Sep 29, 2012 at 20:18
Yes, for all the trouble of removing the gearbox for a worn clutch, I would be removing the flywheel for a machine the face.
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Follow Up By: sweetwill - Sunday, Sep 30, 2012 at 07:47

Sunday, Sep 30, 2012 at 07:47
Yes I'm with you Andrew, get the clutch kit, spigot bearing, and don't forget the back oil seal while the gearbox is out,I just had the clutch replaced in the hilux for $350 labour and was pleased to pay it.
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Reply By: Member - Jack - Saturday, Sep 29, 2012 at 20:24

Saturday, Sep 29, 2012 at 20:24
Yes, it is do-able but not a fun job. I have just had my son replace my 80 Series clutch. 'We' chained the gearbox so that once it cleared the spline it would not just crash to the floor. Once it cleared it was an easier matter to gently lower it to the floor. 'We' took the transfer case off before we refitted the gearbox.

The other advice is also good ... get the flywheel machined before installing a new clutch. Some clutch suppliers will machine it for you free if you buy the clutch from gythem.

I should also add that the 'we' I use is the Royal 'we'. My son did all the hard yakka, but I put the chain across, and helped to 'wriggle' the gearbox, but that was about the extent of my involvement.

Jack
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Follow Up By: MichaelR - Saturday, Sep 29, 2012 at 21:04

Saturday, Sep 29, 2012 at 21:04
Thanks for the comments. Just to be clear, was the transfer still on when you removed the gearbox?
I was hoping to do the same thing although the book says to remove it. It should be ok as long as I don't have to rotate the gearbox to much.
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Follow Up By: Member - Jack - Sunday, Sep 30, 2012 at 08:00

Sunday, Sep 30, 2012 at 08:00
The transfer case was attached when it was removed and was attached again when the gearbox was reinstalled.

We did rotate the gearbox to get it out though using the chain at a means of preventing it falling to the ground, and onto those underneath trying to get it out.

Jack

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Reply By: Member - nick b - Sunday, Sep 30, 2012 at 08:00

Sunday, Sep 30, 2012 at 08:00
Gooday Michael : I searched a forum and found this , most post say they remove trans case to make it easier . IMO it is must to do the job right . replace all clutch parts as in a clutch kit "complete" worth it in the long run , as you will find out , you wont want to do it again in a hurry !!!
you will have to aline the clutch plate " special tool "

I split the transfer case off the gearbox, which made things easier. If I did it again I’d remove the front and rear drive shafts a bit earlier in the piece to give me room to remove those lovely little Toyota electrical connectors on the gearbox and transfer case.

I had a little bit of trouble with the transfer case separation because the alignment dowels had a bit of corrosion on them. I cleaned these up with a bit of scotch brite before reassembly.

Removing the gearbox top retaining bolts was made easier when I had removed the gearbox cross member and lowered the rear of the gearbox. This gave me a bit more room to access the top bolts. I placed a small piece of wood between the cylinder head and the firewall to help protect the engine mounts.

Once I pulled the gearbox back enough to clear the starter motor stud, I rotated the gearbox anti clockwise enough to provide clearance for the gearbox starter motor nose support area. Then gearbox can then be moved backwards and away for the clutch assembly.

Removing the spigot bearing was interesting. I didn’t realise how large the cavity behind the spigot is. The recess in the crankshaft is deceiving. Once full of grease, a quick strike of the hammer against a round brass drift ejected the spigot pretty quickly.

I had to extend the clutch adjuster on the pedal to lift the clutch engagement off the floor.

I was showing a young would be mechanic how to do this task, so it took a bit longer than what I’d like. It took about 12 hours and I had the clutch replaced and the car back on the road.
Cheers Nick b
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Follow Up By: Member - nick b - Sunday, Sep 30, 2012 at 08:36

Sunday, Sep 30, 2012 at 08:36
Also use " quality " parts , the forum was talking about 4terrain & sufari .clutch kits ...have you looked into the parts ?
Cheers Nick b
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Follow Up By: MichaelR - Sunday, Sep 30, 2012 at 20:54

Sunday, Sep 30, 2012 at 20:54
Nick. That is a fantastic way to remove the spigot bearing. Have I got it right? You fill the cavity behind the bearing with grease and then strike a drift about the same size as the gearbox input bearing that is positioned in the recess. I presume a bolt of the right size would do. Most importantly, am I going to get a face full of sprayed grease? If so I may wait until my wife is out before I do it!
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Follow Up By: Member - nick b - Monday, Oct 01, 2012 at 00:28

Monday, Oct 01, 2012 at 00:28
you could try Olive oil " extra virgin " and have it with you lunch LOL
Cheers Nick b
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Reply By: Life Member Tour Boy( Bundy) - Sunday, Sep 30, 2012 at 09:37

Sunday, Sep 30, 2012 at 09:37
Don't forget to undo the front engine mounts before you lower the rear of the motor or you will tear the front mounts.
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Dave
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Reply By: MichaelR - Sunday, Sep 30, 2012 at 09:54

Sunday, Sep 30, 2012 at 09:54
Thanks everyone. Great description Nick. You aren't available for instructing other would-be mechanics are you?
I have already bought an Exeedy Safari Tuff clutch and do plan to have the flywheel refinished. There has been some smelly, obviously hot moments with the old clutch and the flywheel will definitely need attention.
Looks like it will be best to do as the book says and separate the transfer. Good advice about the engine mounts too.
If anyone else has any hints please let me know. Thanks
Michael
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Follow Up By: Member - nick b - Monday, Oct 01, 2012 at 00:25

Monday, Oct 01, 2012 at 00:25
description is from lcool forum not me sorry
Cheers Nick b
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Reply By: Member - Rob S (NSW) - Sunday, Sep 30, 2012 at 12:53

Sunday, Sep 30, 2012 at 12:53
Hi
All good info above.
Good idea to remove the fan or cowl and rear heater hoses to let the engine tilt.
As they can interfere and or get broken.
Good idea to remove the transfer case first.
An engine hoist is also handy to lift and lower the gearbox,this can be attached through the gear selector hole in the floorpan, use a ratchet strap around the gearbox.
2 lengths of threaded rod are handy to place through the mounting holes to pull the gearbox back into position.as they are one heavy gearbox.and awkward if you are doing it on ramps or stands.

If any thing use a genuine Toyota clutch.machine the fly wheel, and replace the rear engine seal,


look here as well
http://www.lcool.org/forum/viewforum.php?f=3

Rob

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and that's when I thought I was wrong!

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Follow Up By: MichaelR - Sunday, Sep 30, 2012 at 20:48

Sunday, Sep 30, 2012 at 20:48
Rob
Great idea about the threaded rod. Do you screw that into the engine bolts holes before you lift the gearbox up or when you have it approximately in line?
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Follow Up By: Member - Rob S (NSW) - Sunday, Sep 30, 2012 at 22:30

Sunday, Sep 30, 2012 at 22:30
I used 10mm threaded rod with nuts and washers. if the gear box goes straight back on easy no problem. when i did my 80 series, i did it on my own, and there was no way i could push it together the last 50mm.
Put the thread rod in and screwed it together,as the weight of the gear box was always pushes it back.


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and that's when I thought I was wrong!

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Reply By: Bob Y. - Qld - Sunday, Sep 30, 2012 at 21:37

Sunday, Sep 30, 2012 at 21:37
Michael,

Never done a 105, but have replaced g'box/tcase in a 60 series, and have done a number of 75 clutches. We did the 75's on a ramp, so had plenty of room underneath, and were able to pull the floor out and put a piece of pipe through the cab, with an endless chain hanging off it. We did the lowering of the rear of the engine too, but can't remember removing the t'case, or having to tilt the transmission either way.

On the 60 series, because it was during some furnace weather, we removed/replaced the tranny, in the shed, and used a trolley jack to take the weight, while we got it into position. Luckily, when re-fitting it, I had 3 burly off-siders who were able to help keep the tranny on the jack.

You can buy them, but I've made clutch alignment tools out of a piece of wooden rake, or broom handle. You grind the end to fit in the centre of the spigot bearing, and once you have the clutch set up, insert this to line up the thrust bearing & spigot bearing.

Think that's about all I could help you with,

Bob.
Seen it all, Done it all.
Can't remember most of it.

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