Gas cooker problems

Submitted: Monday, Oct 08, 2012 at 22:41
ThreadID: 98438 Views:1724 Replies:2 FollowUps:3
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Hi all

Both burners on my Primus gas cooker tend to intermitantly flare up when in use, causing high flames to leap around the kettle or pan. It tends to happen most when first used in the morning, although it doesn't have to be a cold morning.

I'm thinking that it may be a jet problem but thought I'd ask for advise before taking the cooker apart and replacing them, do worn jets cause this type of problem? The cooker is two years old and is only used for a few weeks each year on camping trips. The gas bottle is always kept topped up.

I'd appreciate any constructive feed back.

Regards Jon
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Reply By: Notso - Monday, Oct 08, 2012 at 22:59

Monday, Oct 08, 2012 at 22:59
It could be liquid gas getting to the jet instead of vapour.

Don't know how it could happen in your situation but I've seen it when the cylinder has been laid on it's side.
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Follow Up By: happytravelers - Tuesday, Oct 09, 2012 at 18:40

Tuesday, Oct 09, 2012 at 18:40
Thank's for your reply Notso, I think from what others have said that could be the problem.

Jon
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Reply By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Monday, Oct 08, 2012 at 23:05

Monday, Oct 08, 2012 at 23:05
Hi Jon,

This flaring is caused by liquid, rather than vapour, LPG reaching the burners. It can occur if the LPG cylinder valve is left open when the stove is not being used and there is a drop in ambient temperature. The vapour from the cylinder condenses in the hose into liquid and is carried to the stove when it is lit, causing flaring.

To avoid this, always close the cylinder valve when the stove is not being used, especially overnight. Also ensure that the cylinder is kept below the stove height and keep the cylinder erect with the valve and hose connection uppermost.

Cheers
Allan

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AnswerID: 496334

Follow Up By: Gnomey - Tuesday, Oct 09, 2012 at 11:05

Tuesday, Oct 09, 2012 at 11:05
G'day Jon
Exactly as Allan says.

FWIW I often shut the gas cylinder valve first and let the stove flame die then shut off the stove valves. That way there is nothing in the pipe to condense.

Cheers
Mark
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Follow Up By: happytravelers - Tuesday, Oct 09, 2012 at 18:38

Tuesday, Oct 09, 2012 at 18:38
That makes sense Alan, although I do close the valve at night the hose is quite long and contains a fair amount of gas which could condense into liquid over night when it's cool. I'll try Marks idea of closing the valve first to burn off excess gas in the hose and see if that fixes the problem. We're off on a short trip in two weeks time, so I'll try it then.

Many thanks for your replies, much appreciated.

Jon
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